Department of Theatre Patti & Rusty Rueff School of Visual and Performing Arts

Nancy T. Hansen Theatre Seating Chart

2017-2018 Season Order Form

2017-2018 Season

The Mousetrap
by Agatha Christie
Directed by Richard Stockton Rand
Nancy T. Hansen Theatre in Yue-Kong Pao Hall of Visual and Performing Arts
September 22, 23, 27, 28, 29, 30 at 7:30 and September 24, 30 and October 1 at 2:30

A group of strangers is stranded in a boarding house during a snow storm, one of whom is a murderer. The suspects include the newly married couple who run the house, and the suspicions in their minds nearly wreck their perfect marriage. Others are a spinster with a curious background, an architect who seems better equipped to be a chef, a retired Army major, a strange little man who claims his car has overturned in a drift, and a jurist who makes life miserable for everyone. Into their midst comes a policeman, traveling on skis. To get to the rationale of the murderer's pattern, the policeman probes the background of everyone present, and rattles a lot of skeletons. Another famous Agatha Christie switch finish! Chalk up another superb intrigue for the foremost mystery writer of her time.
Rating: PG13


The Sins of Sor Juana
by Karen Zacarias
Directed by Kristine Holtvedt
Carole and Gordon Mallett Theatre in Yue-Kong Pao Hall of Visual and Performing Arts
November 10, 11, 15, 16, 17, 18 at 7:30 and 12, 18, 19 at 2:30

Sor Juana Inéz de la Cruz, one of the first published poets of the Americas, was born in Mexico in 1648, a poor and illegitimate child. She became renowned for her intelligence and ambition when, at the age of 12, she tried sneaking into the University of Mexico by dressing as a man. The viceregal court of New Spain heard about this phenomenal girl and invited her to join the court, where she developed an extremely close relationship with the vicereine. By all records Juana was a very attractive, complex, witty and difficult young woman. She wrote and read voraciously. Her circumstances and intelligence provoked admiration and envy. However, when she was 17, she suddenly and inexplicably left the viceregal court to join a convent. There are theories about failed love, fear of marriage and her sexual identity. In the convent her focus was not God, but writing—and her work and poetry expressed a feminism centuries ahead of her time. For years while the church struggled to silence her she resisted and continued writing until, one day, she wrote a declaration in her own blood, vowing never to write again. She remained true to her word and died soon after. This play is a researched fantasy that explores the two turning points in this woman's life.
Rating: PG13

The Beaux' Stratagem
by George Farquhar
Directed by Richard Sullivan Lee
Nancy T. Hansen Theatre in Yue-Kong Pao Hall of Visual and Performing Arts
February 16, 17, 21, 22, 23, 24 at 7:30 and 18, 24, 25 at 2:30

First produced in England 1707, the play tells the story of two young bucks who, having spent all their money by living too well, leave London and roam from town to town in search of love and fortune. In order to find a wealthy heiress for at least one of them, they pose as master and servant – exchanging roles from one town to the next. In Lichfield, Aimwell is the master and Archer the servant, and there they meet the lovely, wealthy Dorinda and her equally desirable sister-in-law, Mrs. Kate Sullen. They set their caps for these women, but problems abound. Kate is married to a drunken sot who despises her; the innkeeper's saucy daughter, Cherry, has set her cap for Archer; Dorinda's mother, Lady Bountiful, mistakenly believes herself to be a great healer of the sick, and she guards her daughter like a dragoness; and a band of brigands plans to rob the house of Lady Bountiful that very night, putting all schemes in jeopardy. This is a play in the great tradition of Goldsmith's She Stoops to Conquer and Sheridan's The Rivals and The School for Scandal. It is classic, formal, robust and hilarious.
Rating: PG13


Clybourne Park
by Bruce Norris
Directed by Amy Lynn Budd
Nancy T. Hansen Theatre in Yue-Kong Pao Hall of Visual and Performing Arts
April 13, 14, 18, 19, 20, 21 at 7:30 and 15, 21 at 2:30

Winner of both the Pulitzer Prize and the Tony Award for Best Play, Clybourne Park is a razor-sharp satire about the politics of race. In response to Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun, playwright Bruce Norris set up Clybourne Park as a pair of scenes that bookend Hansberry’s piece. These two scenes, fifty years apart, are both set in the same modest bungalow on Chicago’s northwest side that features at the center of A Raisin in the Sun. The first scene takes place before and the second scene takes place after the events of A Raisin in the Sun. In 1959, Russ and Bev are moving out to the suburbs after the tragic death of their son. Inadvertently, they have sold their house to the neighborhood’s first black family. Fifty years later in 2009, the roles are reversed when a young white couple buys the lot in what is now a predominantly black neighborhood, signaling a new wave of gentrification. In both instances, a community showdown takes place, pitting race against real estate with this home as the battleground.
Rating: PG13


TICKET INFORMATION:
Gen. Public: $19.50
Student: $12.50
Senior (62+): $15.50

Tickets may be purchased at all campus box offices, or by calling (765) 494-3933 or (800) 914-SHOW, or online at www.purdue.edu/theatre/tickets.

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