Skip to main content
Loading

Upcoming Courses

Spring 2023 Graduate Course Descriptions

Listed below are the Philosophy courses being offered at Purdue University in Spring 2023. The courses are listed by their five-digit course number and course title, followed by a brief description. The tables below each description also include information on the course type (e.g., lectures = ‘LEC’), the enrolment limit of the course, the day(s)/time of the course or each section of it, the classroom in which the course will be taught, and the instructor(s) for the course. Courses that include a recitation section are marked in the tables below as type ‘LEC/REC.’ Details of the recitation sections are not listed. The type ‘DIST’ indicates a fully asynchronous, online course. ‘Grad’ indicates that a graduate student will be the instructor of record. PHIL courses that are cross-listed with other courses are marked as such (e.g., ‘c/l DEPT 10000’).

Note that in the Spring 2023, there will also be some hybrid modalities of instructional delivery. Section types that have an * after them (e.g., ‘LEC*’) include notes below the information tables describing the method of delivery for those courses/sections for Spring 2023.

Have questions about philosophy graduate courses? You can contact our Grad Coordinator, Vickie Sanders, via email at sanders@purdue.edu, or by phone at 765-494-4275.

500 LEVEL COURSES

50600 Advanced Philosophy of Religion

This seminar addresses the issue of whether what we know about the quality of conscious life on Earth provides the resources for a good argument, not just for the probable truth of atheism, but for atheism itself.  The main reading for the course will be a preliminary draft of a book manuscript written by the course instructor called Atheism and the Problem of Evil.  Class meetings will be informal and discussion-based.

Course

Type

Enrolment

Time

Bldg/Rm

Instructor

PHIL 50600

LEC

10

W 2:30-5:20pm

BRNG 1248

DRAPER

51500 20th Century Analytical Philosophy II

This course is an exploration of some major developments within analytic philosophy between roughly 1930 and 1970. Movements covered will include logical positivism, logical empiricism, ordinary language philosophy, pragmatism, and others. 

Course

Type

Enrolment

Time

Bldg/Rm

Instructor

PHIL 51500

LEC

10

TR 12:00-1:15pm

BRNG 1248

ASAY

52000 Existentialism

This course will combine historical survey with in-depth analysis of a few major works in the existentialist tradition. It will consider individual works by Kierkegaard and Nietzsche, essays by Heidegger in the volume edited by David Krell, and by Simone de Beauvoir in a volume edited by Margaret Simons, and sections of Sartre’s Being and Nothingess. Each participant will be asked to give a class presentation on a work that is not part of the common readings, and to write a term paper..

Course

Type

Enrolment

Time

Bldg/Rm

Instructor

PHIL 52000

LEC

10

TR 9:00-10:15am

BRNG 1248

MCBRIDE

53200 Studies in Theory of Knowledge (Epistemology)

The focus of the course will be contemporary analytic epistemology.  The four main topics we will look at are:

  1. the foundationalism-coherentism debate;
  2. the internalism-externalism debate;
  3. radical skepticism and responses to it;
  4. the epistemology of testimony.

Course requirements: keeping up with the reading, a short paper, a long paper, a class presentation, and several shorter written assignments (no exam).

Course

Type

Enrolment

Time

Bldg/Rm

Instructor

PHIL 53200

LEC

10

TR 3:00-4:15pm

BRNG 1248

BERGMANN

55300 Mathematical Logic

An introduction to metatheoretic studies of formal axiomatic systems. Basic set theory is de-veloped for use as a tool in studying the propositional calculus. Further topics may includemany-valued logics and basic (metatheory for) modal or predicate logic.

Course

Type

Enrolment

Time

Bldg/Rm

Instructor

PHIL 55300

LEC

10

M 2:30-5:20pm

see note below

TULODZIECKI

*PHIL 55300 will be delivered by synchronous Zoom lectures. Students will not have to be in a classroom to participate in the lectures.

58000 Nature of Philosophy

What is the nature of philosophy? Why is it distinct from theology or mythography? We have a fairly clear picture of the history of the term ‘philosophy’ in a large number of languages and cultures. We also have a fairly clear picture of what persons do that describe themselves or are described as philosophers in different cultures at different times in history. What, then, should be what philosophers do? Responses to that question has generated radically different answers. The course will focus on two lines of debate: epistemology (what is knowledge) and ontology (competing theories of the self – the type of entity that can be knowledgeable).

Students taking the course for a Department of Philosophy requirement of either Epistemology for Value Theory, please advise.

Sample of key authors:

Martin Heidegger, What is Philosophy?, Gilles Deleuze & Felix Guattari, What is Philosophy?, Giorgio Agamben, What is Philosophy?, Enrique Dussel, Beyond Philosophy, Bertran Russell, The Problems of Philosophy, José Ortega y Gasset, The Modern Theme, Leonard Harris, Philosophy Born of Struggle, Al-Ghazoli, (al-Ġaz(z)ālī) The Incoherence of the Philosophers

Sample of key reference texts:

Classical Philosophy, Peter Adamson

Taking Back Philosophy, Bryan W. van Norden

The Philosopher: A History in 6 Types, Justin E.H. Smith

Course

Type

Enrolment

Time

Bldg/Rm

Instructor

PHIL 58000

LEC

10

T 6:30-9:20pm

BRNG 1248

HARRIS

 

600 LEVEL COURSES

68000 Seminar in Philosophy

Each week we will read parts of students’ dissertations and provide constructive criticism. The goals are for students to gain feedback on their dissertations and practice commenting constructively on others’ work, while also imposing some external pressure to keep the writing process moving forward. 

Course

Type

Enrolment

Time

Bldg/Rm

Instructor

PHIL 68000

LEC

15

W 11:30am-2:20pm

BRNG 1248

DAVIS

 

Want to know what else we offer? Check out the Master Course List