Week 3

Thursday, February 15, 2018
4:00 - 5:00 pm
STEW 302/306

Patricia Boling, Professor of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts, will be speaking on Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven.


Station Eleven

NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST
PEN/FAULKNER BOOK AWARD FINALIST
ARTHUR C. CLARKE SCI FI BOOK AWARD WINNER

Kirsten Raymonde will never forget the night Arthur Leander, the famous Hollywood actor, had a heart attack on stage during a production of King Lear. That was the night when a devastating flu pandemic arrived in the city, and within weeks, civilization as we know it came to an end.

Twenty years later, Kirsten moves between the settlements of the altered world with a small troupe of actors and musicians. They call themselves The Traveling Symphony, and they have dedicated themselves to keeping the remnants of art and humanity alive. But when they arrive in St. Deborah by the Water, they encounter a violent prophet who will threaten the tiny band’s existence. And as the story takes off, moving back and forth in time, and vividly depicting life before and after the pandemic, the strange twist of fate that connects them all will be revealed.

Praise:

Station Eleven is a superb novel. Unlike most postapocalyptic works, it leaves us not fearful for the end of the world but appreciative of the grace of everyday existence.” —San Francisco Chronicle

“Darkly lyrical. . . . Station Eleven is a truly haunting book, one that is hard to put down and a pleasure to read.” —The Seattle Times

“Emily St. John Mandel delivers a beautifully observed walk through her book's 21st century world, as seen by characters who are grappling with what they've lost and what remains. While I was reading it, I kept putting the book down, looking around me, and thinking, "Everything is a miracle." —NPR

Station Eleven, if we were to talk about it in our usual way, would seem like a book that combines high culture and low culture—“literary fiction” and “genre fiction”…. Much of the book’s power, in fact, comes from the way it brings together these different fictional genres and the values—observation, feeling, erudition—to which they’re linked.” —The New Yorker

McCarthy possesses a massive, Biblical vocabulary and he unleashes it in this book with painterly effect . . . . It will grip even the coldest human heart." —The Star-Ledger

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