fig. 43: Female, 1997
© Corinne Whitaker

unfolding: a memoir

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Spirituality

There are other spiritual questions that haunt us as well: what if the universe is God's epileptic seizure, and what if She never recovers?

There are myths that disturb us too, the toxic myths that some of our daughters still digest. The passive princess brought to life by a prince's kiss. The chambermaid sister who moves her bondage from a cheap broom to an expensive shoe. The eve-il woman who poisons her man with her forbidden hunger for knowledge. The woman as vessel while the male god gives birth to his own son. The Buddha - the Yahweh -the Allah - the Zeus - the Quetzalcoatl. Where are the voices of women? They are portrayed in novels like "The Miracle Strain" as the New Messiah with Jesus' genes transmuted into a rabid killer. Or they themselves are too busy digesting their disneyphallic mushmyths of minnieminds and flutterbrains. Do we really want our daughters to love a rat?

fig. 44: Woman With a Mirror, 1997
© Corinne Whitaker

POWER . . . WAR . . . GREED . . .AGGRESSION . . .TERRITORY . . . Are these success myths, or are they genetic commands? And who is the commander? Is there some way to alter the DNA of death-dealing? I presume that Hitler, the unabomber, the Menendez brothers, were once trusting infants and lovable babies. What kinds of myths were fed to them along with their pablum? What happened to these children on the road to maturity? And how do we accept that they, like us, are human beings, members of the same species, offspring of male and female coupling, born of mothers' wombs? We are all killers, thinking killers: would you kill Hitler, given the chance? Where does the killing stop? Have we ever developed a sufficiently intensive myth of peace?

fig. 45: Trapped, 1996
© Corinne Whitaker

Some myths are beginning to fall, like that of our bodies as unique and unchanging. You don't need a body to move around in cyberspace; indeed your physical body becomes limiting. As you move forward and backward in time, as you change shapes and personalities in virtual worlds, you find that some bodies work best in some situations, while other bodies work best at other times.

fig. 46: Good Buddies, 1994
© Corinne Whitaker

If you keep changing bodies, and personas, who are you? Does an alternate personality active only in cyberspace logically constitute a person? Do cybercreatures have human rights? What happens when the same person defines herself differently with different emails, or with different fantasy areas called MUDS? As we extend our bodies into our machines, do we indeed know our boundaries anymore?

fig. 47: thE holloW maN, 1995
© Corinne Whitaker


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Spirituality

All text and images © Corinne Whitaker.