CLA Department and School Mentoring Guidelines

Each department and School in the College of Liberal Arts has a mentoring program in place for junior faculty. While there are differences in how each department/school provides professional development experiences for their faculty, they all recognize the importance of supporting faculty in their career development.

Mentoring Areas:

African American Studies and Research Center

African American Studies and Research Center supports the development of junior faculty through a formal mentoring program. Each untenured faculty member is assigned a faculty member within AASRC and a faculty member outside of AASRC and their home department. This external mentor can provide information regarding Purdue’s culture, but is not involved in formally evaluating the mentee’s progress towards tenure.

The AASRC mentor can provide insight regarding the type of work valued by AASRC. Although we cannot mandate the identification of a formal mentor from the home department, the director works with heads to encourage formal mentoring from within the home department. Ideally, each junior faculty member will have a mentoring committee of three senior faculty members.

Mentors are provided with guidelines regarding how often they should try to meet with their mentee and mentees are encouraged to solicit the type of advice that they would fine helpful. Each spring, the AASRC director asks the mentee about the quality of the mentoring. Adjustments to the mentoring committee will be made if necessary. 

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Anthropology

Excellent faculty are central to meeting the university’s mission of education, research, and engagement with societal challenges, and the Department of Anthropology is committed to the success of its entire faculty.  

The Department of Anthropology seeks to provide mentoring opportunities for its faculty to assist them in their professional growth.  We see this as particularly important during faculty members’ first several years at Purdue University as they develop their roles as teachers, undertake their research agendas, and prepare for tenure and promotions.

The Department provides annual feedback through the Primary Committee review of curriculum vitae in the fall and the department head’s review of Annual Activity Reports each spring.  In addition, each assistant professor is given a mentoring committee, selected by the assistant professor and the department head, that consists of two or more senior faculty members.  

Goal of mentoring

The goal of this mentoring team and the individual mentoring relationships is to ensure that each faculty member has information and advice that may assist with their development and success in the areas of research, teaching and learning, engagement, and university and community service.  The mentoring relationship is intended to help the assistant professors better understand Purdue’s policies and expectations so that they can succeed in achieving tenure and promotion at Purdue.  The mentoring team should help the faculty member set goals, share knowledge about external funding agencies and processes, and as appropriate, facilitate collaboration and/or interdisciplinary research.

Associate professors who wish to have mentoring as they prepare for promotion consideration to the rank of full professor are also welcome to request that mentoring relationships be arranged by the department head.

Procedures

Upon joining the department, newly appointed assistant professors will be invited to a meeting with the department head.  The head will do the following:

  1. Explain the procedures for tenure and promotion at Purdue and give information on the location of all policy documents governing promotion and tenure at Purdue.

  2. Provide a copy of the Department of Anthropology’s mentoring statement and guidelines for promotion and tenure.  

  3. Discuss possible members of the mentoring team.  (The head will later ask specific individuals to serve in this role and will appoint one of them to arrange for the first meeting.)

  4. Discuss the curriculum of the department, the courses already offered by the department, which of those courses the faculty member is likely to teach in their first several years, and ideas for any new courses the faculty member is considering developing.

  5. Encourage the faculty member to participate in orientations and special programs the university provides for new faculty members and other professional development activities.

  6. Be sure the faculty member knows how to get information on the governance structure of the university, grant resources, sexual harassment policies, opportunities for collaborative projects, and other relevant information.

Activities of the mentoring team

The faculty member and mentoring team will decide for themselves how to conduct their mentoring relationship. The mentoring committee may want to help the assistant professor become familiar with the academic community and culture at Purdue, and mentors may want to take the initiative to introduce the new faculty member to faculty and research groups from other departments who may share similar interests.   Mentors can be asked to share advice about professional development resources available at Purdue that would help the assistant professor with research and teaching performance.

In some cases, the faculty member and the mentoring team may wish to create one‐year or five‐year activity time‐lines, and the mentors can provide feedback on its appropriateness or help the faculty member decide how to meet the goals.  Members of a mentoring team can be asked to give initial reviews of manuscripts or grant proposals.  Mentors may offer constructive criticism and provide advice about managing common difficulties.  Mentors also may help the faculty member identify their professional strengths and weaknesses.

After the initial meeting, the assistant professor should initiate subsequent meetings with the committee, at least once a semester initially, and annually after that.  The assistant professor is welcome to call upon the senior faculty members for individual consultation about professional development.

Supplemental mentoring and networking

All faculty members are encouraged to seek out supplemental informal mentoring from their colleagues, including other department members, other faculty at Purdue, and other scholars in a broad network beyond the university. Networking is important for developing research and publishing collaborations, learning from the experiences of others, establishing one’s reputation among potential external reviewers, and keeping abreast of new developments in one’s areas of expertise, so that we can pursue excellence in our department.

Each faculty member is encouraged to develop contacts with scholars in the field (presenting papers at conferences, etc.).  This networking helps faculty members establish: a) potential research collaborations, and b) potential external reviewers for the tenure and promotion or promotion process.

Changing the arrangements

The department head monitors the mentoring relationship, and the faculty member is expected to seek assistance or advice if for whatever reason a change might be beneficial or if the existing mentoring relationship is not working well.  It is not unusual to shift responsibilities for mentoring from time to time.

July 27, 2009

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Communication

At the one of first two primary committee meetings of each year a senior faculty member volunteers and is assigned to mentor a new colleague and continues in that role until the mentor or mentee requests a change. Mentors typically report to the primary committee on their mentoring activities and career progress of their mentees at least once a year.

This mentoring process is in effect while faculty members are at the assistant or associate professor levels. Primary committee members also volunteer to undertake informal mentoring with new colleagues during the year. 

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English

Faculty mentoring, for tenure-track and associate professors, in the Department of English takes place through formal and informal practices.

MENTORING OF TENURE-TRACK FACULTY

The Head of the department shares responsibility with members of the Primary Committee in English in formally mentoring tenure-track faculty:

▪ The Head meets annually with untenured faculty as a group to discuss the tenure and promotions procedure and to answer any questions they may have about departmental, college, and university procedures and expectations.

▪ The Head or a designee observes classes taught by untenured faculty and meets with them to discuss their teaching.

▪ All untenured faculty are reviewed annually by the Primary Committee of the department in the spring. The faculty member being reviewed submits a current cv, copies of which are distributed to all members of the Primary Committee. A subcommittee of 2 or 3 tenured professors is assigned to the faculty member under review: the subcommittee looks at research materials (work in print and in progress), course materials, and student evaluations, and meets with the faculty member to discuss these materials. The subcommittee then drafts a review document, using a standardized template developed by the Primary Committee, and the document is circulated to the full committee for discussion and approval. The process culminates in a meeting of the tenure-track faculty member, the Head and the subcommittee chair, in which a discussion of the review document leads into broader mentoring advice about scholarship, teaching, and any other concerns the reviewee might have.

Informal mentoring is also important in the Department of English. As a department, we encourage all faculty to seek advice and feedback from colleagues and the Head about their ongoing research. Untenured faculty are put into contact with faculty members who share similar scholarly and teaching interests and are encouraged to speak with the Head if they would like help in identifying a mentor, either for a specific project or for the long run.

MENTORING OF ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS

Associate Professors who have been affiliated with the Department of English for several years typically have established their own informal networks of collegial collaboration and advice. In recent years, the department has adopted a formal mentoring process for associate professors, patterned on the annual reviews that advise tenure-track faculty.

Associate Professors in the department are reviewed approximately every four years, or more often if the faculty member requests it. The faculty member being reviewed submits a current cv, copies of which are distributed to all members of the Primary Committee.  A subcommittee of full professors reviews materials supporting scholarship, teaching and engagement submitted by the reviewee, and meets with the faculty member to discuss these materials. The subcommittee then drafts a review document, which is circulated to the full committee for discussion and approval.  The reviewee receives a copy of the review and then meets in person with the Head and the sub-committee chair to discuss the review and strategies for building a promotion case. In recent years, since the department adopted this practice, several associate professors have used the mentoring and review process to put together successful dossiers for promotion to full professor.

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Languages & Cultures

Mentoring for SLC Faculty                                           1/13/2014

The School of Languages and Cultures is committed to helping every faculty member succeed at each stage of their career. All new assistant professors, and associate professors by request, shall have one or two official mentors.  This mentoring team will help the assistant professor progress towards a successful third-year review and then a successful bid for promotion with tenure. 

Assistant professors will be assigned two mentors during their first semester in the SLC.  Those asked to be mentors will have the option to say no.  Associate professors can be assigned one or two mentors by request as they prepare for promotion.  The arrangement will have a three year duration; and can be renewed by mutual agreement or terminated if the relationship is not productive.

Goal of mentoring: The goal of this mentoring team is to ensure that each faculty member has information and advice that may assist with their development and success in the areas of research, teaching and learning, engagement, and university and community service.  The mentoring relationship is intended to help assistant professors better understand Purdue’s policies and expectations so that they can succeed in meeting the standards for tenure and promotion at Purdue. 

Mentor and mentoree responsibilities:  Mentors and assistant professors shall meet throughout the academic year to help new faculty  become familiar with Purdue’s policies and standards for tenure and promotion; to get in touch with others on campus; to give suggestions on research program development (focus, venues, forms of publication); and to advise during preparation of documents (Form 36&c). The mentoring team shall help the faculty member set goals, share knowledge about funding sources, and as appropriate, facilitate collaboration and/or interdisciplinary research. Mentors shall report on the new colleagues’ progress at Primary Committee meetings.  Mentorees shall communicate with mentors to make sure their needs are being addressed appropriately, and should take seriously advice given them by the mentors. 

Activities of the mentoring team:  The faculty member and mentoring team will develop their relationship in tandem.  The mentors shall help the new faculty member become familiar with the academic culture at Purdue and make them aware of helpful contacts and resources from across campus.  They may wish to devise a timeline of activities with specific goals and ways in which the assistant professor can attain these goals.  Mentors may provide initial reviews of manuscripts or of teaching or research proposals.  Mentors may offer constructive criticism and provide advice about managing challenges, and may help the faculty member identify their professional strengths and weaknesses.

Role of Head:

The Head shall meet at the outset of fall semester with new assistant professors and shall:

1.  Explain the procedures for tenure and promotion at Purdue and give information on the location of all policy documents governing promotion and tenure at Purdue.

2.  Provide a copy of SLC’s mentoring statement and guidelines for promotion and tenure. 

3.  Discuss possible members of the mentoring team.  (The Head will later ask specific individuals to serve in this role and will appoint one of them to arrange for the first meeting.)

4.  Encourage the faculty member to participate in orientations and special programs the university provides for new faculty members and other professional development activities. 

5.  Make sure the faculty member knows how to get information on the governance structure of the university, grant sources, sexual harassment policies, opportunities for collaborative research, and the like.

See also:  http://www.purdue.edu/cie/teachingacademy/FacultyMentoring.html

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History

1. During the first semester the newly hired assistant professor will select a mentor and consult with the head about this appointment. If the mentor agrees and the head believes that it is a good match, the mentor will be appointed for the duration of the evaluation period leading to promotion with tenure.

2. During each academic year, the assistant professor will visit the mentor’s classes to observe his or her teaching techniques. The mentor also will observe the classes of the assistant professor and offer advice about teaching methods that are appropriate for the courses in question, e.g. large lectures, upper-level specialties, and seminars.

3. The assistant professor and mentor will meet informally as they deem appropriate to discuss the research, publication, and teaching as well as career tracks, preparation of the resume (Form 36), and other matters essential for the tenure review process of the assistant professor. The mentor particularly will provide guidance about placement of conference papers and article manuscripts as well as evaluate the written work of the assistant professor upon the request of the junior faculty member.

4. The mentor will read the book manuscript of the assistant professor and provide advice about the best placement of the manuscript with a publisher. This review will be an ongoing process with the mentor reading chapters, revised chapters, and the entire manuscript as it develops.

5. Each year the mentor will provide an oral evaluation of the research, publications, and teaching of the assistant professor to the Primary Committee. The Primary Committee will use this report in its annual letter of evaluation to the junior faculty member.

6. The mentor will provide a written evaluation of the scholarship and teaching of the assistant professor to the Primary Committee for the third-year review. The Primary Committee will use this report in conjunction with other evidence provided by the faculty to determine whether contract extension is merited.

7. The mentor, assistant professor, and Head will meet periodically to discuss the junior faculty member’s progress toward promotion and tenure. 

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Philosophy

The mentoring system for tenure-track assistant professors and tenured associate professors is informal, in the sense that no one is formally assigned to be the mentor for any faculty member.

Faculty eligible for promotion to either rank forge links with others with similar research interests, who read and critique their work, and offer advice for appropriate journals and presses for scholarly publication. The department head bears responsibility for seeing that this informal system functions properly, and for taking action if it fails to do so.

To date, this has largely involved watching it function properly, sometimes offering additional or corrective advice about the nature of the promotion process. For tenure-track assistant professors, conversations about such matters occur at least every fall semester, in a mandated discussion of the Primary Committee evaluation of progress toward tenure and promotion. For associate professors, they occur when they seek them.

To preclude breakdowns in the system requiring subsequent repair, the department head will inform each assistant professor that senior faculty are able and willing to help them in their scholarly and professional endeavors.

The head will also assure them that if they are reticent to ask senior colleagues for such help directly, he or she will assist them in securing advice and guidance from senior faculty. 

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Political Science

Faculty Mentoring Policy Adopted 10/27/11

Mentoring of junior faculty facilitates a collegial and collaborative work environment and is critical to the success of our department. Mentoring is a process in which faculty members share their experiences regarding a variety of issues related to professional development, research, teaching, engagement, and service to the department, University, and professional communities external to the department. Although much of this should occur in a natural, informal way, through multiple interactions, we have established the following departmental guidelines to ensure that mentoring does occur.

  1. The department head will assign a faculty mentor to all untenured professors during their first year, in consultation with the faculty member and the prospective mentor.

  2. Appointment of a faculty mentor will be an option for all Associate Professors.

  3. Under normal circumstances, untenured faculty should meet with their mentor at least once per semester.  It is the responsibility of the mentor to initiate these meetings.

  4. Mentoring should address various aspects of research, teaching, engagement, service, and professional development issues, as necessary and appropriate. The mentoring process is intended to provide general guidance on various aspects of successful professional development, rather than to provide guidance specific to procedural aspects of the case for promotion and tenure.

  5. The department head will check with untenured faculty once per year to verify that effective mentoring is occurring.

  6. If at any point the process breaks down, the mentor/mentee can approach the department head to correct it in a mutually agreeable manner.


Individual Promotions Committee Policy Revised Fall 2013

(1) It is the policy of the department that all junior faculty shall be assigned an Individual Promotions Committee (IPC) of at least two members of the full primary committee (i.e., associate and full professors), with the responsibility of synthesizing and writing up an annual review of the faculty member’s progress toward promotion and tenure based on the discussions in the full primary committee meeting each year.

(2) Formation of the committee: Formation of the IPC should normally occur no later than the second year of the appointment for new faculty.  The IPC shall be constituted by the department head, in consultation with the candidate.

(3) Duties of the IPC: The IPC should take the lead in presenting the faculty member’s progress toward promotion and tenure to the full primary committee on a yearly basis. After the discussions of the full primary committee, the IPC is then responsible for drafting a written summary of the primary committee’s feedback to the candidate regarding his or her progress toward promotion and tenure. This summary is to be reviewed and approved by the Department Head before being delivered to the candidate in writing and in a personal meeting including the Head, the IPC, the mentor, and the candidate, normally by the end of the academic year.

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Sociology

Assistant Professors in Sociology are required to form a three‐member mentoring committee.  The Department Head approves the committee and encourages the assistant professor to seek guidance from the mentoring committee.  

The mentoring committee includes associate and full professors who work in the assistant professor’s substantive, theoretical, and methodological fields of expertise.  The chair of the committee is a full professor. Mentors may read papers and suggest revisions, help identify the most appropriate journal for publication, suggest research proposal ideas, and so forth.  

At annual primary committee meetings, the mentoring committee chair is called on to report on the progress of assistant professor.  Other members of the mentoring committee, followed by other members of the primary committee, express their perceptions about the assistant professor’s work.   

Associate Professors are strongly encouraged to form mentoring committees but they are not required to do so.  

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Visual and Performing Arts

Untenured Assistant Professor and Associate Professor Mentoring Procedures 

Revised August 21, 2007

A. The Mentoring Team

  1. The Department Head will appoint a mentoring team from among the Primary Committee membership for each untenured candidate early in the fall semester. The team will work with the candidate throughout the probationary period unless compelling reasons necessitate a change. When a candidate is successfully tenured and promoted the same mentoring team will continue to advise the new Associate Professor working toward promotion to Professor, unless compelling reasons necessitate a change.

  2. As Primary Committee membership and the number of untenured candidates allow, at least 2 members of the mentoring team will be from the candidate’s division of the department. In divisions with fewer than two Primary Committee members, a member (or members) from outside the candidate’s division will be appointed. As members of the Primary Committee all tenured Associate Professors will be appointed as mentors along with Professors to mentoring teams.

  3. The mentoring team will be responsible for (1) guiding the candidate through the promotion process; (2) advising the candidate on the preparation of the promotion document and materials; (3) becoming thoroughly familiar with the candidate’s work; and (4) communicating its assessment of the candidate’s progress to the Primary Committee.

B. The Candidate

  1. The candidate will provide material to the mentoring team that will enable the team to understand and assess the candidate’s scholarly/creative work.

  2. The candidate will provide material to the mentoring team that will enable the team to understand and assess the candidate’s teaching performance.

  3. The candidate will provide material to the mentoring team that will enable the team to understand and assess the candidate’s service contributions.

  4. The candidate will freely seek and receive the advice and counsel of the mentoring team throughout the mentoring process.

C. The Process

  1. In order for the mentoring process to synchronize with the Primary Committee’s activities, it will operate on an April to April calendar.  Mentoring teams will be formed and assigned to new faculty in the fall, and they - - as well as those previously assigned to faculty yet in their probationary period - - will begin the mentoring process in that month.

  2. The mentoring team will schedule meetings with the candidate shortly after the Primary Committee’s meeting in fall and before the April review of faculty. During these meetings, the team will emphasize the Departmental promotion standards, review the candidate’s record and plans for future work, and provide recommendations.

  3. Through meetings and periodic updates during the course of the academic year and the following summer, the mentoring team will become/remain thoroughly familiar with the candidate’s work.

  4. Prior to the Primary Committee’s annual review of faculty in April, the mentoring team will prepare a summary report of the candidate’s achievements in teaching, research/scholarship/creative endeavors, and service, and its own assessment of the candidate’s progress toward promotion and tenure. The team will share the report with the candidate prior to presenting it to the Primary Committee in April, and the candidate will have an opportunity to suggest changes and provide updates. The Mentoring Team’s written review of each faculty member will be submitted to the department head in a digital format following the primary committee’s meeting in April.

  5. The mentoring team will present its summary report to the Primary Committee at the committee’s April meeting.

  6. The team’s report, as well as the candidate’s document, will be the material on which the Primary Committee makes its recommendations and bases its decisions.

  7. The Department Head will communicate the Primary Committee’s recommendations and decisions to the candidate following the committee’s April meeting.

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