Monitoring and Evaluation

The PPP takes a careful, methodologically sound, and participatory approach to the monitoring and evaluation of its work. As a university-based program, the PPP embraces a mission that includes adding to the body of knowledge in the peacebuilding field by documenting and disseminating its work to practitioners and scholars alike.

The PPP team and its collaborators collect data at multiple points in time to assess the impact(s) of their work on the ground and to evaluate the locally-driven peacebuilding approach. Fellow practitioners and academic publications have recognized the PPP for its thoughtful approach to monitoring and evaluating impact.

The way PPP assesses impact depends on the nature of the project, but in general it looks for (a) changes in perceptions and behaviors among individuals over time, (b) changes to media coverage of the issue and the local peace committee over time, and (c) other kinds of outcome changes.

All of PPP’s claims about the impact of its work are grounded in empirical data, collected over time. Here are just a few highlights of what the PPP knows about the impact of its work to date.

PPP Impact Infographic

To Monitor our Work's Progress:

  • PPP’s country directors and local collaborators monitor our work’s progress regularly by working with local peace committees, observing their activities, and talking with opinion leaders and other community members about their perceptions of our work.
  • PPP researchers have weekly Skype calls with our country directors and local collaborators in order to discuss our work’s progress and impacts.
  • PPP researchers monitor media coverage related to our work and the region we are working in every day.
  • PPP researchers discuss our work’s progress during weekly team meetings. These discussions serve as fruitful brainstorming sessions for moving our work forward.
  • Jessica Berns, the consultant to PPP, also serves as a valuable source of feedback in moving our work forward. The PPP Director has weekly phone calls with Jessica. 

To Assess our Work's Impact:

  • The PPP collects and analyzes data at multiple points in time before, during, and after a project.
  • These data consist of (a) secondary data such as media coverage and online reports from other organizations (non-governmental organizations, governments, etc.); (b) focus groups, (c) one-on-one interviews, (d) surveys (when culturally appropriate), and (e) observations. PPP researchers record all focus group and interview data (after receiving permission) and transcribe these recordings verbatim. PPP researchers then analyze the data to measure impact.
  • The ways in which PPP assesses impact depend on the nature of the project, but, in general, we look for (a) changes in perceptions and behaviors among individuals over time, (b) changes to media coverage of the issue and the local peace committee over time, and (c) other kinds of outcomes (e.g., the Berekum chieftancy dispute being resolved; local peace committees preventing violence in neighboring communities; local peace committee members being asked to serve on regional or national task forces).
  • All of our claims about our work having impact are grounded in empirical data as collected over time.
  • We also consider what other international or domestic non-governmental organizations are working in the area when making claims about our work’s impact. 
 

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