Courses

History 10300 INTRODUCTION TO THE MEDIEVAL WORLD 
Cr. 3
This course is a survey of medieval history in Europe from the fall of the Roman Empire to the birth of the Renaissance. We explore political, religious, and social changes as well as economic, technological, and cultural developments, seeking to understand the complexity of the medieval past, including an awareness of the experiences of peasants, townsfolk, students, the religious, knights and nobles. Topics include: the Birth of Christianity and decline of the Roman Empire; Barbarian nations; the Feudal World and Crusades; Chivalry, Medieval Warfare, and the Arthurian legend; Cities, Education and Daily Life; the Church, Heresy & Witchcraft; and The Black Death.

History 10400 INTRODUCTION TO THE MODERN WORLD 
Cr. 3
Traces the expansion of Europe into the Americas, Africa, and Asia. The French Revolution, nationalism, and the development of Western European states from the era of the Reformation to the present are studied.

History 10500 SURVEY OF GLOBAL HISTORY 
Cr. 3
This course surveys the cross-continental interactions between the civilizations of Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas since 1300, with attention to cultural comparisons over time, and to the impacts of global interdependence upon ecosystems and economies, cultures and geopolitics. Among the themes we cover are: the politics of religious culture, the rise of land and sea empires, epidemic diseases through history, race and gender relations, revolutionary ideologies and new labor and social relations, the cultures of colonialism and neo-colonialism, the technologies of world wars, and the rise of global production and consumer markets. Our formats include lectures, discussions, classroom interactions; our sources include original documents, histories, maps, literature, and feature films.

History 15100 AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877 
Cr. 3
This course treats developments in American history from the earliest colonial beginnings through the period of the Reconstruction. For about the first third of the course the subject materials covered include: the processes of colonial settlement, the growth of self-government in the English colonies, and an examination of the problems which beset the British empire during the years 1763-1775. Attention is next focused on the American Revolution in its military, social and political dimensions. The launching of the new government under a federal constitution and the growth of political parties form the broad pattern for the middle of the course. Westward expansion is treated as an integral part of the economic and national growth of the country. Concurrently, with this analysis of political, economic, and social growth, the student's attention is directed to the concepts of American nationalism offered to the electorate by the major political parties, i.e., their ideas and programs for national life. The remaining portion of the course emphasizes the hardened definitions of nationalism presented by the breakdown of the democratic process, and the Civil War and Reconstruction.

History 15200 UNITED STATES SINCE 1877 
Cr. 3
This course begins by emphasizing the problems after Reconstruction, the new industrialism, the last frontier, and agrarian discontent. Attention is focused next upon overseas expansion and the Progressive Era. Later topics include the approach to and participation in World War I, the problems of prosperity during the "normalcy" of the 1920's, the depression and the New Deal, the role of the United States in World War II, the Cold War at home and abroad, the politics and culture of reform in the postwar era, the Vietnam war, the conservative ascendancy of the 1970s and 1980s, and a view of America in the 1990s. The course covers the social, economic, and political developments within the United States as well as its diplomatic history in the period of its emergence as a leading world power.

History 19500 THE HISTORIAN'S CRAFT: HISTORICAL RESEARCH AND FILM FOR MAJORS 
Cr. 3
Examines various interpretative approaches and genres of history; students also critique a historical film based on their own research, learning to decipher fact from fiction and how bias and subjectivity enter into the history on screen.

History 20100 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY 
Cr. 3 (May be repeated for credit.) 
This variable title course deals with broad historical topics that transcend and telescope traditional analytical, chronological, and geographical boundaries. Content will vary with the instructors teaching the course.

History 21000 THE MAKING OF MODERN AFRICA
Cr. 3
This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to modern African history from 1800 to the present. Using a variety of films, novels and scholarly resources, we will examine the major historical forces that have shaped African lives over the last two centuries. Emphasis will be placed on African experiences of slavery, colonialism, liberation struggles and post-independence nation building. Students will also learn to analyze contemporary African issues within a larger historical context.

History 21100 THE GLOBAL FIELD: WORLD SOCCER AND GLOBAL HISTORY
Cr. 3 
This is an introductory course to teh history of soccer, on and off of the pitch.  It studies the history of the game itself as well as the international economic, political, social, and cultural trends that shaped it.

History 22800 ENGLISH HISTORY TO 1688 
Cr. 3
This course deals with the story of England from the Anglo-Saxon period to 1603; a principal theme is the growth of Anglo-Saxon society, legal rights and political institutions. Among the topics to be considered are the Norman Conquest, Magna Carta, the changing nature of medieval England beset by black death and economic growth, the emergence of the strong Tudor state and the challenge to authority that resulted in the revolutions of the seventeenth century. Readings will include original documents as well as Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.

History 22900 ENGLISH HISTORY SINCE 1688 
Cr. 3
History 229, the history of England from 1603 to the present, is primarily concerned with change. It deals with the questions of what causes political revolution and industrial revolution, what effects they have, and which have the more fundamental effect on most people’s lives. The course will consider the following problems: Why did England have a revolution in the period 1640-1660 four decades after the death of its most popular monarch Queen Elizabeth? How was stability restored and what was the political and social structure of Jane Austen's England? Why did England have the first industrial revolution? What impact did industrialization have on people's lives—was it a “good thing”? How did England go from being the foremost example of the laissez-faire economy to the welfare state?

History 23800 HISTORY OF RUSSIA FROM MEDIEVAL TIMES TO 1861 
Cr. 3
This course traces the history of Russia from its earliest origins under the Viking conquests to the emancipation of the serfs in 1861. We pose several questions during the semester. What were the main historical characteristics of Russian culture, social structure, and political life? What were the sources of its triumphs and tragedies? What did the Russians give, what did they take, as they gathered hundreds of Caucasus, Siberian, Central Asian, and European peoples around them into the "all-Russian" state? We search for answers in the history of Kievan Rus', Orthodox Christianity, the Mongol Conquest, the emergence and territorial expansion of Moscow, the consolidation of autocracy and serfdom, the abuses of Ivan the Terrible, the reforms of Peter the Great, peasant and national rebellions, revolutionary movements, and the rise of empire to the Crimean War. Along with essay examinations and short papers, students will help to create and play a game-style simulation on, "Russia's Circular Frontier and the Rise of Muscovy."

History 23900 HISTORY OF RUSSIA FROM 1861 TO THE PRESENT 

Cr. 3
This course discovers Russian history as a metaphor for global history, a study of the crises posed by the world revolution of western values. Spanning from the borders of Europe to the steppes of Asia, Russia became one of history's greatest land empires. Yet twice in recent times (1917 and 1991), the state collapsed under the weight of its own contradictions, driven in part by the pace of European and American modernization. We will study Russian history from the "Great Reforms" of the late empire (1861) to the Russian federation under Vladimir Putin, surveying the growth of revolutionary movements; political and economic reforms; ethnic conflict and Russian imperialism; social transformations and cultural revolutions; Bolshevism, Leninism, and Stalinism; World War II and the Col War; the collapse of the USSR; and present challenges. Besides essay examinations and short papers, students will work together to create the enact a game-style simulation on, "The Genesis and Structure of the Stalinist State."

History 24000 EAST ASIA AND ITS HISTORIC TRADITION 
Cr. 3
Using archeology, myth, art, and architecture, as well as written texts, this course will explore East Asian society and culture from the formation of the earliest state in the Yellow River Valley (ca. 1400 BCE) to the early nineteenth century. The content includes the Confucian tradition, the creation of centralized states in Korea and Japan, the introduction of Buddhism, the conquests of the Mongols and Manchus, and the development of an urban, commercialized early modern culture. Readings include a textbook and literary works. Students will be evaluated on the basis of essay examinations, reading quizzes, and papers.

History 24100 EAST ASIA IN THE MODERN WORLD 
Cr. 3
A survey of China, Japan, and Korea from the Seventeenth Century to contemporary times, this course investigates the formation of modern nation states in East Asia. In addition to a textbook, readings include personal narratives by East Asians, lectures, slides, and videos.

History 24300 SOUTH ASIAN HISTORY AND CIVILIZATIONS 
Cr. 3
The South Asian subcontinent is home to over a billion people, just over 23% of humanity. A vivid mixture of languages and religions, the region has an equally rich and complex history and culture. Orientalist stereotypes, however, have dominated the image of South Asia as composed of certain simple and spurious religious and cultural essences shorn of all their complexity. For a lot of people in the United States, for example, India often equals

  1. docile women with dots on their foreheads;
  2. religion, non-violence and/or Gandhi
  3. poverty stricken masses, the object of pity or charity.

This course seeks to provide a more dynamic conception of the peoples of the subcontinent as historical actors contributing to and engaging with their own history.  We will survey the history, culture and political economy of the subcontinent from the coming of the British to the present. Some topics under consideration will be: the transition to colonialism; social, economic and cultural change under British rule; nationalism before and after Gandhi; regional and religious identities; decolonization and partition; the character of the post-colonial era in India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. There will be significant use of primary written sources (in English) and multi-media presentations.

No background requirements but a love of Indian films essential!

History 24500 MIDDLE EAST HISTORY AND CULTURE 
Cr. 3
This course is designed to introduce the student to the major political and cultural achievements of one of the worlds great civilizations. It begins with a brief sketch of the geographical features and social institutions which have typified the Middle East over the last two thousand years. It then examines the religious climate of the Middle East in the sixth century and traces the rise of Islam and of its institutions. The medieval Islamic states and their successors, such as the Ottoman Empire and Safavid Persia, are then surveyed with special attention being given to functioning and interaction between social, political and religious institutions. Approximately the last third of the course is devoted to a study of the changes which have taken place in recent times as the societies of the Middle East have attempted to resist or to adopt the political systems, the social institutions, the technology and all the other pressures that have been placed on them by the "modern" societies of the West.

History 24600 MODERN MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA 
Cr. 3
This course analyzes the major currents and themes of Middle Eastern history from the late-nineteenth century to the present day. Dealing chronologically with the Arab-Islamic world, we address the following: colonialism (late-19th c. to WWII), nationalism (1950s and 1960s), Islamic fundamentalism (1970s and 1980s), and terrorism (1990s to present). For each chronological period, I draw your attention to specific case studies, and these include such hot spots as Algeria, Afghanistan, Egypt, Iraq and Israel/Palestine. For over 100 years, the peoples in these places have been grappling with issues of democracy, religion and national identity as well as their conflicting reactions toward Western intervention in a variety of forms. Students explore the political, social and cultural factors that have contributed to the formation of the modern Middle East by combining readings from textbooks with primary documents and ethnographic films.

History 25000 US RELATIONS WITH THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA
Cr. 3
Since 9/11, the US has engaged in military interventions in Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya.  In this way, the US is now more intimately involved in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) than at any other time in its history.  This course surveys US foreign policy toward the Arab-Islamic world since World War II.  In doing so, it provides students with the background needed to understand the decisions and policies of American leaders in the past and in the present.  This course responds to the following questions:  Why has the US focused considerable attention on the Arab-Islamic world over the past seven decades?  How has the US foreign policy toward the Middle East and North Africa evolved over time?  What role has the US played in shaping the political history of the Arab-Islamic world?  How should the US address present-day problems in the MENA particularly that thorny issue of democratization?  To respond to these questions, students read secondary texts and primary sources.  Ultimately, students identify continuity and change in US foreign policy toward the MENA over the course of the past seven decades.

History 27100 INTRODUCTION TO COLONAL LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY (1492-1810) 
Cr. 3
Despite being our closest neighbors, the countries of Latin America remain a mystery to most Americans. This is a general survey course, the purpose of which is to explore the principal historical themes of Latin America during the colonial period (roughly, from 1492 to 1810). After a brief look at the geography of Latin America, we will cover such topics as the encounter between Europeans and indigenous peoples, institutional structures of empire, the composition of society, Spanish and Portuguese Indian policies and native responses, economies and labor systems, and, finally, the growth of distinctive cultural and racial identities on the eve of independence. The class format consists primarily of lectures, augmented by discussion, slides, and perhaps a movie (“The Mission”).

History 27200 INTRODUCTION TO MODERN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY (1810-PRESENT)
Cr. 3
This course is a continuation of History 271, and examines the consequences of independence and the long struggle toward nationhood. Problems common to all Latin American countries are analyzed followed by a detailed examination of the political development of the major nations during the nineteenth century. Primary attention is given to the many complex problems faced in the twentieth century to include the role of the church and the military in political affairs, the influence of foreign capital and investments, the emergence of the middle class sectors and major labor movements, the need for land reform, monoculture, population pressures, and foreign relations.

History 30000 EVE OF DESTRUCTION: GLOBAL CRISES AND WORLD ORGANIZATION IN THE 20TH CENTURY 
Cr. 3
Using a variety of case studies, this course considers turning points – often violent and disastrous ones – in an emerging global conversation about urgent world problems and their possible solutions. Topics include the successes (and failures) of the League of Nations and the United Nations; the development of international law; and the increasing significance of NGOs in recent decades. No prerequisites.

History 30200 HISTORICAL TOPICS 
Cr. 3 *May be repeated for credit.
This variable title course deals with broad historical topics that transcend and collapse traditional analytical, chronological, and geographic boundaries. Content will vary with instructor teaching the course.

History 30305  FOOD IN MODERN AMERICA
Cr. 3
This course examines the kitchen as an architectural space, a place of labor and food production, and an arena for technological innovation in modern American history.  Cooking and eating reflect cultural sentiments about modernity, progress, ethnicity, and family, and the politics of how society nourishes bodies.

History 30400 AMERICA IN THE 1960S 
Cr. 3
This course surveys the political, social, and cultural history of 1960s America. The “Sixties” is something of a misnomer. The period was defined less by the borders of a single decade than by movements and issues that emerged in the 1940s and were only partially resolved by the time Richard Nixon resigned the presidency in 1974. There also is no consensus about the era’s meaning or significance—the 1960s continue to be the subject of passionate debate and political controversy in the United States. The times they were a-changin’, but why, how, and to what end? In exploring this turbulent decade, the course examines what did and what did not change in the 1960s.  Topics include: the presidencies of John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, and Richard M. Nixon; the triumph and breakdown of postwar liberalism; the resurgence of conservatism; the many insurgent political and social movements of the decade, including the civil rights and black power movements, the new left, environmentalism, the chicano and red power movements, feminism, and the gay liberation movement; the counterculture; the sexual revolution; rock ‘n’ roll; and the Vietnam war. Students will investigate these and other issues in a mix of printed, visual, audio, and multimedia sources such as speeches, correspondence, newspapers and magazines, autobiographies and oral histories, photographs, television, movies, and music. This course is open to all undergraduates. There are no prerequisites. 

History 30505 THE UNITED STATES IN THE WORLD: 1898-PRESENT
Cr. 3
This course explores the central issues and themes of American foreign relations during the twentieth century with a primary focus on the expansion of American political, military, economic, and cultural power and the broader global context of Americans’ engagement with the world. We will begin by exploring the United States’ emergence as a world power at the end of the nineteenth century, a process that culminated in the Spanish-American War and the United States’ acquisition of a colonial empire in the Caribbean and the Pacific. We will then turn our attention to Americans’ experience in the First World War, and Woodrow Wilson’s failed attempt to remake the international state system. We will then assess the United States’ role in the world as it languished in economic depression and as tensions intensified in Europe and Asia, culminating in the Second World War and the United States’ emergence as the preeminent world power. We will trace the early strategies employed by American policymakers toward the emerging Soviet threat (containment, NSC-68, and Massive Retaliation). We will also explore the United States’ increasing involvement in the Middle East, Asia, and Latin America, with particular focus on the Arab-Israeli Conflict, U.S. support for “friendly” dictatorships in the Western Hemisphere, and American involvement in the Vietnam War. We will conclude by addressing the end of the Cold War, the United States’ role in the world during the 1990s, and the ongoing global War on Terror.

History 31005 THE CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION, 1850 TO 1877
Cr. 3
This course will examine the causes, fighting, and outcomes of the American Civil War and Reconstruction. The course combines lectures, readings, films, and discussion to address such questions as why the war came, why the United States won (or the Confederacy lost), and how the war affected various elements of American society. The principal goal of the course is to provide students with an understanding of the scope and consequences of the bloodiest war in our nation's history--a war that claimed more than 620,000 lives, freed nearly 4,000,000 enslaved African-Americans, and settled definitively the question of whether states had the right to withdraw from the Union. Although this is not a course on Civil War battles and generals, about half of the time in class will be devoted to military affairs. It is impossible to understand the broad impact of the war without a grasp of how campaigns and battles shaped attitudes and actions on the home front, and there will be a special effort to tie events on the battlefield to life behind the lines.

History 31200 THE CRUSADES 

Cr. 3
This course considers the origins, course, and impact of the Crusades on Christian, Islamic, Byzantine, and Jewish societies between the eleventh and fourteenth centuries. Why did the Crusades start when they did? What did the Crusaders hope to accomplish? Who were the important individuals active in crusading? How did bloody warfare and intense religious enthusiasm come together during the crusading period? What were the economic and intellectual results of the crusades on European life? Of what significance are the Crusades in the history of Western Civilization? These are some of the major questions that will be considered during the course of the semester's work.

History 31405 STEM AND GENDER
Cr. 3
Technological innovation has been a cornerstone of American identity.  How technology matters to gender, and gender matters to technology, will be explored through studying amateur and professional scientists, industrialization, education, sexual division of labor, and home and work spaces in twentieth century America.  Examining objects of technological innovation, their production, consumption, and use, reveals changing relationships between men and women.

History 31505 AMERICAN BEAUTY
Cr. 3 
This course explores twentieth-century gender history in the United States through beauty and and its intersections with politics, economics, technology, medicine, and nation building.  Modern womanhood, everyday life, and identity will be exploried through advertising, pageants, and material culture.

History 31700 A HISTORY OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH AND THE EXPANSION OF CHRISTIANITY I 
Cr. 3
The Christian Church shaped the West, and continues to influence it profoundly. Born within the ancient Roman Empire, Christianity survives in diverse forms throughout the world: the Church is arguably the most influential and long-lived institution in world history. Tracing the Church’s evolution from its foundations to the fourteenth century, History 317 will concentrate on five interlocking themes: 1) the Christianization of the Roman Empire and of the Germanic peoples; 2) the hierarchical structure and governance of the Church; 3) the relations between the Church and various monarchies; 4) the rise, triumph, and decline of papal authority; and 5) the principal movements aiming at the reform of the Church. Until about 600 CE, the course concerns the Church throughout the Mediterranean world. Thereafter, it concentrates on the Latin Church in Western Europe, devoting little attention to the Greek, Oriental, or Slavic churches.

History 31800 A HISTORY OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH AND THE EXPANSION OF CHRISTIANITY II 
Cr. 3
A continuation of History 317, the Reformation, and the major developments in Christianity and the churches in modern world.

History 31905  CHRISTIANITY IN THE GLOBAL AGE 
Cr. 3
This coure examines the social, cultural, economic, legal, and religious dynamics of global Christianity in its emerging centers of Latin America, Asia, and Africa during the 20th and 21st centuries.

History 32000 THE WORLD OF CHARLEMAGNE 
Cr. 3
This course examines the efforts of Charlemagne (A.D. 768-814) to create a new European civilization after the collapse of the Roman Empire in the West. The course will include the perspectives of his successors and rivals, as well as of Saxons, Vikings, Muslims, Byzantines, popes, bishops, abbots, and important men and women who also populated Charlemagne’s world and helped to shape its successes as well as its failures. The course emphasizes the interplay between politics and art, culture, religion, and society.

History 32105 SPAIN: THE FIRST GLOBAL EMPIRE, 1469-1713
Cr. 3
This course examines the history of Spain's global empire from the unification of the kingdoms of Castile and Aragon to the War of the Spanish Succession.  Topics include Spain's European possessions, overseas empire, ruling dynasty, society, and culture.

History 32200 MONARCHY: ITS RISE AND FALL 

Cr. 3
This course will trace the rise and fall of Europe's great monarchs and monarchies from the Renaissance to the present day. Lectures will deal not only with the craft of kingship as practiced by Europe's outstanding rulers, but will also examine the institution of monarchy itself and its responsiveness to society's changing needs and values. Major topics will consist of the Renaissance Prince and State as it evolved in Italy and spread to the rest of the continent. The evolution of absolute monarchy as a response to the religious wars and international warfare; the emergence of enlightened despotism; the challenge of the French Revolution and royalty's response to it in the age of Metternich and Bismarck; the collapse of the Russian, German, Austrian and Turkish empires in World War I; and the world's monarchies today.

History 32300 GERMAN HISTORY 
Cr. 3
How could the Germans, a people of great historical and cultural accomplishments, produce the barbarity of Nazism and the Holocaust? This is the central question of modern German history. The answers lie not only in the story of the Nazis themselves, but in the entire history of the German people. This survey requires no prerequisites. It introduces German history with brief coverage of the medieval, reformation, and early modern periods, and then turns to a more detailed study of German unification under Bismarck, the rise and fall of the Weimar Republic, and the victories and defeats of Hitler and the Nazis. The post-World War II period deals with West Germany, East Germany, Austria, and German reunification.

History 32400 MODERN FRANCE 
Cr. 3
This course covers the history of France from 1789 to the present. It addresses the following topics: French Revolution; Napoleon; continuing revolutions throughout the nineteenth century culminating in a democratic republic; industrialization and its effects on society; the persistence and transformation of farming and peasant life; changes in women's roles, gender relations, and sexuality; colonialism; victory in World War I and its implications; defeat and collaboration in World War II; intellectuals' role in postwar society and politics; decolonization and postcolonialism; the long and turbulent history of Franco-American relations.

The format will be lectures, discussions, readings, papers, and some films. The objectives of this course are to introduce students to major developments in the history of the West and the world through the close study of one nation in the modern era - France, and to develop students' analytical, communication, and writing skills.

History 32501 TWENTIETH CENTURY EUROPE THROUGH AUTOBIOGRAPHY 
Cr. 3
This course analyzes a variety of personal narratives (autobiographies) written by Europeans who lived through the twentieth century to consider their merits and limitations as sources for understanding history. Specific topics covered include World War I, the rise of Nazism, World War II, the Holocaust, the Soviet take-over of Eastern Europe, and the welfare state, as well as family, ethnicity, sexuality, gender, and social class. It addresses questions like the following: how did individuals represent their lives and events in twentieth-century Europe? How and why did they write autobiographies? What are appropriate ways for historians to analyze personal narratives? How do autobiographies enhance understanding of twentieth-century Europe?

The goal of this course is to articulate the role of personal narratives in modern history. To that end, students will read numerous autobiographical accounts, and discuss them extensively in class throughout the semester. This will be the main method of learning and evaluation. Some lectures will provide historical background and context, and at least two films will represent an alternative "narration" of twentieth-century European historical events. Students will be asked to lead a discussion and provide background information. Some short essays (5 pages) and a longer reflective essay will also be required. Through the discussions, the papers, and the final take-home essay examination students will convey exactly what they have learned about twentieth-century European history from the autobiographies, as well as the strengths and weaknesses of particular autobiographies as historical sources.

History 32600 POPULAR CULTURE IN PREINDUSTRIAL EUROPE (1400-1800) 
Cr. 3
A survey of European history from the perspective of common people. How did they, when confronted with unprecedented economic expansion, population growth, urbanization, and Christianization, change the way they worked, played, worshipped, persecuted witches, and raised children?

History 32700 THE HABSBURG LEGACY: CENTRAL EUROPE, 1500-2000 
Cr. 3
It is impossible to comprehend the problems that confront modern east central Europe without understanding the region’s history. This course will examine its special evolution and problems from the perspective of the multinational Habsburg and Ottoman empires, and the countries that replaced them in the twentieth century. Individual topics will show how: geography played a key role in setting east-central Europe apart from the rest of the Continent; centuries of warfare between the Christian and Moslem worlds forced massive population shifts that created the region’s current, hopelessly mixed ethnic map; the character of the Habsburg and Ottoman empires slowed the evolution of western models of government; religious antagonisms between Protestants, Catholics, Orthodox Christians and Moslems ultimately led to today’s numerous ethnic conflicts; Germany’s growing dominance in the region has deep and extensive historic roots.

History 32800 HISTORY OF WOMEN IN RENAISSANCE EUROPE 
Cr. 3
This course studies the history of women in early modern Europe (1500-1800). It examines the roles, images and experiences of women as wives, mothers, nuns, artisans, peasants, prostitutes, scholars and sovereigns and follows the developments and changes in the history of women in the eras of Renaissance, Reformation and Revolution. Women’s history is inextricably linked with that of men and children and hence this is a history of human lives, an examination of the social and fabric of early modern Europe. Topics discussed include: family formation and structures, love, marriage, and sexuality, sanctity and religious life, political participation and power, literacy and women’s literature, the representations of women, and early feminism.

History 32900 HISTORY OF WOMEN IN MODERN EUROPE 
Cr. 3
This course examines the history of women in modern Europe from 1789 to the present, analyzing both women's experiences, and the social and cultural constructions of femininity. It also attends to different contexts of class, ethnicity, and nationality in the history of European women. Subjects covered include women's participation in revolutions, state interventions in the family, working lives of women, ideals and practices of sexuality, the middle-class model of domesticity and women's responses to it, the rise of feminist movements, women in socialism, the role of women and femininity in imperialism, the experiences of two world wars, women under fascism, women in the transition from communism to capitalism, and contemporary feminisms in Europe.

The format will be both lecture and discussion, with a few films. Students will be called upon to be historians themselves by reading and interpreting a variety of primary source materials, including fiction, autobiography, and other historical documents written by women.

No prior knowledge of European or women's history is necessary or expected. Students who take the course for honors credit will read additional works and/or view additional films, meet for discussion outside of class, and write a short research paper.

History 33000 HISTORY OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE AND COMMONWEALTH, 1783 TO 1960 
Cr. 3
History 330 is a course where the histories of many regions – India, Australia, the West Indies, Canada and Africa – can be studied within a single framework. The course examines the way in which changing conditions and policies in Great Britain influenced the destinies of colonial territories and in later independent nations throughout the world.

With the great age of world revolutions as a point of departure, the course analyzes how the loss of the American colonies in the 1780's, coupled with the Industrial Revolution, worked to recast the Empire into a new design allowing representative government for the white settlement colonies but imposing paternalistic authoritarian governments on the tropical dependencies. The influence of nineteenth century economic and social theories – classical economics, balance of power diplomacy, humanitarianism, militarism, Social Darwinism and racism – on policy will be examined in broad outline. In addition the power of great men – (Clive, Pitt, Disraeli, Rhodes, Gandhi, Nehru, Nkrumah) – to shape events will come in for considerable attention.

The final sections of the course deal with the rise of Indian and African nationalism, decolonization and the transformation of the Empire into a multi–racial Commonwealth in the twentieth century.

History 33100 GREAT FIGURES IN HISTORY 
Cr. 3
A series of autobiographical and biographical sketches of figures distinguished as well as lesser-known in all fields of activity.

History 33300 SCIENCE AND SOCIETY IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION I 
Cr. 3
A survey of the main lines in the development of science and society in western civilation from earliest times to Newton's discovery of gravitation.  Beginning with prehistory and Egyptian and Mesopotamian civilizations, the course treats in more detail the Greeks and Romans.  The course then considers science during the Middle Ages, examining the transmissions of ancient science and its incorporation into the body of Christian doctrines. The course concludes with the new efforts of physicians and astronomers to free their studies from the influences of the Church and antiquity, and the new accomodations between science and society during Scientific Revolution.

History 33400 SCIENCE AND SOCIETY IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION II 
Cr. 3
This course considers Western science and society from the time of Newton to the present. Beginning with Copernicus to Newton, topics next include biological classification, modern chemistry, and the onset of the industrial revolution.  For the nineteenth century the course stresses the maturation of biology, Darwinian evolution, the dynamic synthesis and electromagnetic studies, and the second industrial revolution.  In the twentieth century, the course covers modern physics, the life sciences, the understanding of the universe, and the interaction between pure and applied science.  The course concludes with some of the modern social and political problems with science caused by its success.

History 33505 NATIONALISM AND SOCIALISM IN EAST CENTRAL EUROPE
Cr. 3
This course examines how the peoples of East Central Europe engaged and coped with the most influential ideologies of the 20th century; with special attention to the weaknesses of the interwar and postwar regimes, strategies of modernization , survival, and dissent.  By the end of this course, students will have gained a deeper understanding of the patterns and processes, ruptures and continuities which have shaped modern east central European society, culture, and politics.

History 33700 EUROPE IN THE AGE OF THE COLD WAR 
Cr. 3
This course examines the predicament of a Europe ruined by war, caught between the might of the United States and the Soviet Union. How did Europeans respond to American cultural, military, and economic power? What explains Western Europe's remarkable recovery in the 1950s and the cultural turbulence of the 1960s? Why did the Soviets fail in their quest to dominate East Central Europe? From the Marshall Plan to the fall of the Berlin Wall, this course aims to place current disagreements between "Old Europe" and the New World in a broader historical context. The final weeks will also raise contemporary issues such as immigration and European unification.

History 33805 HISTORY OF HUMAN RIGHTS
Cr. 3
This course explores human rights' genealogy and uneven historical development from Atlantic Revolutionary articulations through the late 20th Century and experience of globalization.

History 33900 TRADITIONAL CHINA 

Cr. 3
A consideration of Chinese civilization from its origins to the end of the Ming Dynasty (1644). Attention is divided equally between political and cultural history, (i.e., art, literature, religion, and philosophy) with an emphasis on the development of traditional institutions in Chinese society, such as the imperial system, the family system, and China's traditional economic structure. In addition, China's attitudes toward government, commercial activity, the foreigner and religion are discussed. Periodic lectures are devoted to artistic and literary achievements, which are regarded as an integral part of the development of Chinese society. This course serves not only the student who is curious about China but the history major who is concentrating on some aspect of Western civilization but wishes to broaden his experience through a study of another society. Slides and films are incorporated into the course.

History 34000 MODERN CHINA 
Cr. 3
A study of Chinese history from the establishment of the Ch'ing (Qing) Dynasty in 1644 to 1949, stressing the period since l800. Primary attention is given to internal developments and China's response to Western thought and material accomplishments. In this second semester on Chinese history emphasis falls upon the transition of Chinese civilization from traditional institutions under the imperial system to China's confrontation with the modern world. The persistence of traditional factors, while the nation is challenged internally by frequent rebellions and externally by Western influences, is an important phenomenon to understand if contemporary events in China are to be meaningful. It is for this reason that internal affairs and interpretations of the Chinese response to the modern "barbarian" challenge are stressed. Particular attention is also given to developments which led to the rise of nationalism and its conflict with communism in the twentieth century. The Republican government that was established in 1911 is considered until its demise on the mainland in 1949. The course is of value for students of modern history in general, as well as undergraduate majors in American and European history, and students interested in the process of imperialism/colonialism.

History 34100 HISTORY OF AFRICA SOUTH OF THE SAHARA 
Cr. 3
This introductory course in African history surveys major movements and problems in the development of the people and cultures of sub-Saharan Africa from prehistoric times to the present. Throughout the course major emphasis is directed toward a radical reassessment of the position of the African continent and the role of Africans on the stage of human history and pre-history. Common myths and misconceptions about Africa will be exposed. Following a brief survey of major geographical divisions and linguistic groupings, the course traces such important movements in the early history of Africa as the origins of agriculture, cultural contacts with Near Eastern and Mediterranean civilizations, the diffusion of iron working, and the dispersion of the Bantu-speaking peoples into Central and Southern Africa. Proceeding to the "Middle Age" of African history, emphasis is placed on Africa's rich cultural and artistic heritage, the varied structure of African political systems, and the rise and decline of powerful kingdoms and empires that flourished before the advent of foreign penetration. Although changes since 1600 are viewed against the wider backdrop of challenges from abroad — the Islamic advance, the Atlantic slave trade, western industrialization and colonialism — it is the response of Africans and the transformation of African institutions which provides the main theme of the course.

History 34200 AFRICA AND THE WEST 
Cr. 3
This course centers on the cultures and communities of Western and Central Africa and their relations with other continents, including the Muslim world, western Europe and the Americas. Major aims are, first, to cultivate an awareness of the rich and varied heritages of the African and African-American peoples and, second, to place African history in the context of world-wide economic and cultural movements and trends. “Africa and the West” encourages a questioning spirit. Each lecture will be introduced by a central set of issues for discussion. Using lectures, films and classics from African literature, we examine the ‘triple heritage’ of African traditional religions, plus the roles of Islam and Christianity. After discussing the origins of great African kingdoms and empires and the impact of the Atlantic slave trade, the course shows how modern nationalism and the independence revolutions emerged from African struggles against European colonialism and commercial exploitation. Biographies of great African leaders and the roles of women also figure prominently in the narrative. The course concludes with problems of nation-building and economic development in contemporary Africa. Assignments include three examinations and book review.

History 34300 TRADITIONAL JAPAN 
Cr. 3
Using archeology, myth, art, and architecture, as well as written texts, this course will explore Japanese society and culture from the formation of a state in about the third century CE to the early nineteenth century. Topics of study include the imperial institution, the introduction of Buddhism, the development of a rich literary culture in the Heian period, the rise of the samurai, the transformation of the institution of shogun, and the development of an urban, commercialized early modern culture. Readings include a textbook and literary works. Students will be evaluated on the basis of essay examinations, reading quizzes, and papers.

History 34400 HISTORY OF MODERN JAPAN 
Cr. 3
A survey of the history of Japan from the nineteenth century to the present, this course will include Japan's constructive response to Western economic expansionism, the formation of the modern state, the industrialization of Japan, the development of a mass society, the Pacific War, the American Occupation, the post war "economic miracle," and Japan's position in the world today. Readings include a textbook, one scholarly book, a memoir, and an autobiography. Requirements for the course: hour examinations, paper (on the primary sources), quiz, and a final examination.

History 34901 THE FIRST WORLD WAR
Cr. 3
First World War. Ideally this course will be taken in conjunction with History 351, Second World War, in the Spring since together the two world wars present a modern Thirty Years War (1914-45).  History 349 is designed to explore the origins, course, meaning, and lasting legacy of World War I.

History 35000 SCIENCE AND SOCIETY IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY WORLD 
Cr. 3
An introductory survey emphasizing cultural contexts, relationships with other institutions, and occasional forays into the biographies of major figures. Covering selected major achievements as well as the problems these generate. Neither science nor engineering background is required.

History 35100 THE SECOND WORLD WAR 
Cr. 3
Second World War. Ideally this course will be taken in conjunction with History 349, First World War in the Fall since together the two world wars present a modern Thirty Years War (1914-45).  History 351 will cover the military, diplomatic, political, social, and cultural history of World War II. It will focus on the causes of the war, the battles that decided the war, the leaders (civilian and military) who made the key decisions, and how the war changed society. An additional feature will be how the war is remembered in novels and films. Hollywood features and documentaries will play a crucial part in the course. In short, the course will cover the history of the war from the rise of Adolf Hitler to “Saving Private Ryan.”

History 35205 Death, Disease, and Medicine in 20th Century American History
Cr. 3
This course examines the history of disease, dying, and medicine in United States in the 20th century.

History 35400 Women in America to 1870 

Cr. 3
This course will examine women's evolving social, political, cultural, and economic position in America from the colonial period to 1869 when the women's movement split over the Fifteenth Amendment. We will explore how both men and women thought of women’s proper "place" in society, and how race, class, ethnicity, and the region in which they lived shaped women's experiences. We will examine both the everyday lives of women, such as domestic work, as well as women's efforts to dismantle the private / public barrier-- and the limitations to these efforts. We will discuss women's family responsibilities, work, education, political role, legal position, and sexuality over a period of two and a half centuries. Finally, we will emphasize women's changing relationship with their families, each other, and the state.

History 35500 HISTORY OF AMERICAN MILITARY AFFAIRS
Cr. 3
The main purposes of this course are to acquaint students with the American military experience and to promote an understanding of the major problems of national defense and war. The course will cover military matters from the colonial period through the Gulf War, not only looking at the major wars in our history but also its less well-known conflicts such as the Mexican and Korean wars, as well as the application of force by the U.S. government in peacetime in such matters as Indian relations, labor relations, and “gunboat diplomacy.” The course will not deal with battlefield tactics, but rather will focus on such subjects as wartime strategy, manpower procurement, weapons development, inter-service conflict, and strategic bombing. It will also consider the social dimension of the American military experience, examining soldiers’ life, race relations, the American tradition of civil rule over the military establishment, and other aspects of soldiering beyond the battlefield.

History 35600 AMERICA IN VIETNAM 
Cr. 3
An examination of the economic, political, ideological, and military aspects of America's involvement in Vietnam between 1945 and 1975, covering both the causes and the consequences of American policy toward Southeast Asia in general and Vietnam in particular. This course will be based upon a combination of lecturers, films, and discussion sessions. Each student will be assigned to a specific discussion section after the first day of class. The total classroom time during the course of the semester will average the scheduled 150 minutes per week.

History 35700 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN AFRICA SINCE 1400 
Cr. 3
This is a regional history which embraces the modern nations of Zimbabwe, Namibia, Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland, the Republic of South Africa—their historical roots and cultural antecedents. One of the course’s chief aims is to explore the richness and diversity of the peoples, cultures and economic systems of southern Africa. Commencing with an analysis of geography and ethnography, we move from the early migrations of the Khoisan and Bantu-speaking peoples to an analysis of the state-building endeavors of the Shona, Zulu, Tswana, Ndebele and the Sotho during the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Early European colonization—Dutch and British—epitomized by the Boer Trek of the 1830s—provides a counter theme for attention. A second major goal is to understand the long struggle of southern African peoples towards freedom against the oppressive forces of European imperialism, labor exploitation and racist apartheid which dominated, not only the Republic of South Africa, but also affected the other surrounding nations. In its final section, the course focuses on the heroic efforts of African liberation movements in each of the six countries, culminating in the achievement of freedom and democracy in the Republic of South Africa under Nelson Mandela in the 1990s.

History 35900 GENDER IN EAST ASIAN HISTORY 
Cr. 3
Examination of the construction of tradition and modernity in East Asia through the lens of gender. Topics include the influence of “Confucian” ethics; gender and imperialism; nationalism and revolution; and social change in the aftermath of war and decolonization.

History 36000 GENDER IN MIDDLE EAST HISTORY 
Cr. 3
This course will examine the gendered history, politics, and culture of the Middle East and North Africa. Students will be introduced to a variety of multidisciplinary writings in English by modern Arab, Turkish, Kurdish, Persian, and Israeli writers and will explore the different constructions of femininity based on class, ethnicity, religion, and nationality. We will examine gender roles in Pre-Islamic Arabia, Egypt, and Persia, look at the relationship between Islam and patriarchy in the 7th century C.E., examine representations of women in medieval Arab and Persian texts. We will also study the European colonialists’ appropriation of the issue of veiling, the struggle for women’s rights in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, as well as state and media constructions of gender roles, and the new fundamentalist movements which have once again redefined gender roles in the region.

History 36101 VIOLENCE, WAR, AND MILITARISM IN MODERN AFRICA 
Cr. 3
Why do African countries always seem to be at war? Is this because Africans are inherently more violent than the rest of the world? Or might there be another set of explanations? This course seeks answers to these troubling questions by examining some of the myths and realities about violence, war, and militarism in Africa. Although these issues are not in any way "new" or "modern," our historical gaze will be focused primarily on the last 125 years. Students can expect to engage with a variety of primary courses including films, novels, memoirs, music, and speeches, as well as an array of scholarly literature from various academic disciplines.

History 36305 THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH
Cr. 3
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a historical understanding of the role public health and medicine has played in American history during the 19th and 20th centuries.  How does the health status of Americans reflect and shape U.S.

History 36600 HISPANIC HERITAGE OF THE UNITED STATES 

Cr. 3
Despite their numerical prominence, Hispanics have received relatively little attention in U.S. history. This one-semester course provides a historical perspective on this important group of Americans from the colonial era to the present. Part I of the course treats the historical roots of the Hispanic community by examining the interaction of Europeans, Indians, and Africans in the New World during the colonial period (late-fifteenth to early nineteenth centuries). Part II dwells on the crucial developments in the nineteenth century, when changes in sovereignty made some Hispanics virtual "foreigners in their native land." The patterns of political, economic, and social subordination of Hispanics in nineteenth-century America had a lasting impact on the subsequent history of the Hispanic community. Part III takes a somewhat different approach and examines the history of the three largest groups of Hispanics—Mexican-Americans, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans—during the twentieth century. Treating each group in turn, we will discuss how Hispanics reacted to and helped shape some of the major historical trends of the century. We will also discuss the nature of ethnic identity and how each of these groups has perceived itself.

History 37005 QUEENS AND EMPRESSES IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE
Cr. 3
This course explores the lives and legacies of queens and empresses in early modern Europe within the wider context of gender, political authority, culture, and monarchy.  Students will be introduced to new scholarly approaches to the study of female rulership.

History 37100 SOCIETY, CULTURE, AND ROCK AND ROLL 

Cr. 3
This class will survey the social and cultural fabric of post-World War II United States through the prism of music – rock and roll music. At one level the class will survey trends and styles in rock, focusing first on the artists and groups who gave rise to this hybrid form of music from its country and blues roots. It will then track the rise of rock and roll in the 1950s and the corporate, political, and social backlash against it. The focus on the 1960s will be on music as an expression and extension of the social, cultural, and political changes of that decade. Finally, the class will examine the paradoxical developments of the evolution of “corporate rock and roll” with the emergence of an abrasive, often angry music [read: punk/grunge/rap] by the end of the 1970s and into the 1980s. In the end, this class will examine and explain the technological, business, and social forces that helped cement rock’s position in Western popular culture.

There are five major themes around which the class turns. The first is the importance of African-American culture to the origin and development of rock and roll. The second is the effect of demographic shifts and in particular the dramatic population growth during the postwar era (both in the United States and Britain). Economic issues – prosperity and major and independent record companies – form a third prism through which we will look at rock and roll. Technological innovations that both spread popular music and, in the 1950s, became part of making music, are a fourth theme. Finally youth culture and experiences are central to this class. This interdisciplinary class will empower students to use a medium with which they are somewhat familiar (popular music) to examine less well-known (to them) issues and historical forces that are intrinsic to the American and British postwar experience.

History 37200 HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN WEST 
Cr. 3 

This course examines both the “place” and the “process” of the history of the U.S. West, a shifting region of Native North America that was the object first of Spanish, French, English, and then American expansionism, and finally as a distinct region with a unique relationship to the U.S. federal government, distinctive patterns of race relations, and a unique place in American cultural memory. While this course is a general survey of the west as a region, it will examine the west as both a place and as an idea in American culture and in the popular imagination. Accordingly, it will spend some time in the east exploring the backcountry frontier during the first years of the republic when the west meant the Ohio Valley and Kentucky, as well as focusing on the historical development of the trans-Mississippi west stretching from the Great Plains to the Pacific Ocean. Using films, monographs, memoirs, letters, and academic articles and literary fiction it will explore the struggle for land, resources, identity, and power, which have characterized the west and its role in the history of the American nation-state.

History 37500 WOMEN IN AMERICA SINCE 1870 
Cr. 3 
This course surveys the history of women in the United States from 1870 to the present. By examining the social, political, and economic forces that have shaped that history, the course assesses the sources of change and continuity in women’s lives. Attention is paid to the variety of the female experience in America. We will consider topics such as the changing meanings and understandings of gender; the changing meanings and significance of family, motherhood and personal relationships; changes in women’s education and shifts in female employment; women’s involvement in political and social movements; women’s relationship to the state; expressions and regulations of female sexuality; and women and popular culture. Stressing diversity as well as unity, the course emphasizes the importance not only of gender but also of race, ethnicity and class in women’s lives. The course satisfies the gender requirement in the CLA core curriculum. It is open to all undergraduates. There are no prerequisites.

History 37600 HISTORY OF INDIANA 
Cr. 3 
This course surveys the history of Indiana from the French and English periods (1679-1783), the organization of the state out of the Old Northwest Territory, and the emergence of the modern commonwealth in the twentieth century. The development of Indiana's economy including the growth and decline of key industries, agriculture, and the transportation system is studied. Attention is given to the trends in local politics, the state's participation in national politics, and the creation of its administrative and legal machinery. Finally, the development of an educational system and of Hoosier intellectual, social and religious activity is analyzed.

History 37700 HISTORY AND CULTURE OF NATIVE AMERICA 
Cr. 3 
This topical emphasis of this course is Native American history as experience by the indigenous people in the regions that became the United States. The thematic emphasis is on Native American perspectives, including an introduction to the interdisciplinary methodologies used in the field. This course will present a brief general overview of Native American history for contextual purposes, but will quickly turn to specific regions, events and themes critical to understanding the course of Native American history. The course will emphasize cultural, environment and gender themes as well as important political and economic forces. A final component of this course is to introduce students to Native American history close to home by highlighting how larger events impacted those indigenous peoples living in Indiana and the greater Great Lakes and Ohio River Valley regions.

History 37900 GANDHI: MYTH, REALITY AND PERSPECTIVE 
Cr. 3 
The course charts Gandhi's career against the background of events in London, South Africa and India. It examines the evolution and practical application of his ideas and techniques of non-violent resistance, and his attitudes toward the economy, society and state.

History 38001 HISTORY OF UNITED STATES AGRICULTURE
Cr. 3 
This course surveys the main developments in North American agricultural history, emphasizing the continental United States.  Topics include early American agriculture, the plantation system, land policy, scientific and technological change, agrarian politics, water rights, migrant labor, and agricultural policy.  The course goals are to:  (1) gain a broad understanding of the major economic, social, political, and scientific and technological developments in the history of American agriculture; and, (2) analyze the causes, consequences, and significance of the major events and issues that have influenced the agricultural history of the United States.

History 38200 AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY 
Cr. 3 
This course explores how fundamental Anglo-Saxon legal theories on justice, republicanism, and economics have been modified by the American experience from 1763-1896. While the course deals with judicial interpretations of the Constitution, it does so in terms of the political and social environments in which the courts operated. The course examines the legal and historical context in which the Supreme Court established major early constitutional interpretations regarding federalism, contractual obligations, and regulation of monopolies. The course then turns to the constitutional debates over sectional strife, slavery, and the coming of the Civil War. Finally, we conclude by exploring the Reconstruction-era amendments and the debates over racial and gender equality.

History 38300 RECENT AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY 
Cr. 3 
History 383 is an intensive study of constitutional questions and Supreme Court decisions from 1896 to the present. This course considers how the evolution of constitutional law shaped and was shaped by broader social, political, and economic changes. We will trace the evolution of constitutional jurisprudence from the Court's early twentieth century focus on economic regulation, through the current debates over national security. The course is arranged around several broad themes, including national security and civil liberties, racial equality, personal autonomy/privacy, and First Amendment freedoms.

History 38400 HISTORY OF AVIATION 
Cr. 3 
This course explores the history of human flight and air power: from the early inventors and pilot heroes of the twentieth century to the institutions of aeronautics in the military and industrial networks of the twenty-first. Our approach is comparative, integrating the national histories of Europe (France, Italy, Belgium, Germany, and Russia), the Americas (North and South), trans-Saharan Africa, and Asia (Japan and China) for a broad, global scope. Our focus is on the applications and impacts of aviation in everyday life; in politics and governance; in science and business; and in the making of modern war. We cover the rise of the French aviation industry; the Zeppelins and dirigibles; charles Lindbergh and the opening of the trans-Atlantic flights; aviation breakthroughs and strategic bombing in World War I and II; the "turbo-jet" revolution; the X planes and the Cold War; the Korean, Vietnam, and Iraq wars; and the development of commercial aviation. Special topics for study include: the Wright Brothers and the meanings of invention and innovation; human flight in literature and memoir, propaganda and film; and several case studies of aviation disasters.

History 38505 MEDIA, POLITICS, AND POPULAR CULTURE
Cr.3
This class examines the relationship of media, politics, and popular culture over the course of the twentieth century in American history. Students trace how new media shaped political institutions and practices and afforded opportunities for political change.

History 38700 HISTORY OF THE SPACE AGE 
Cr. 3 
This course offers a history of the space age since 1900, including such topics as: the development of rockets and ballistic missiles, the origins and challenges of space exploration, and the revolutionary applications of orbital technologies. The course is centered on the Cold War in outer space between the USA and USSR. We examine how their different cultural values, political institutions, and military imperatives helped to determine the character of the space age. In other words, we study space science and technology as forms of cultural creativity. We cover such topics as: the Nazi V-2 rocket program, space fiction and the popular imagination, the Sputnik crisis, astronauts and cosmonauts, Apollo and the moon missions, space stations, space disasters, space weapons systems, earth science and astrobiology, the Mars missions, and the present and future of human exploration.

History 39001 JEWS IN THE MODERN WORLD
Cr. 3 
This survey of modern Jewish society, culture, and politics from the expulsion from Spain in 1492 until the collapse of the Interwar state system in 1938 examines Jewish responses to modernity with special attention to the Jewish relationship to the state and with the surrounding non-Jewish cultures, and the diversity of the modern Jewish experience.

History 39100 HISTORY OF RUSSIAN POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT 
Cr. 3 
This course explores the history of mass entertainment and revolutionary experimentation in popular film, the public arts, and daily life in Russia and the Soviet Union (including the native peoples of Central Asia and Siberia) during the twentieth century. Our topics of study include: entertainment and propaganda films of the late empire and Soviet period; the political culture of the Bolshevik revolution; cultural modernization of the Muslim and tribal peoples; Stalinism and Socialist Realism; the conservative values of the Russian people in World War; loyalty and dissent in song, pulp fiction and film; the consumerism of the new Russia. The course challenges students to master their own “art” of public expression through writing exercises, discussions of films, and creative performances. Be ready to enjoy and understand a variety of historical texts, motion pictures, and recordings.

History 39200 INTRODUCTION TO CARIBBEAN HISTORY AND CULTURE 
Cr. 3
This course surveys Caribbean history and culture from 1492 to the present. Major themes include: slavery, race relations, colonialism, independence movements, the evolution of gender systems, and sovereign identities (colonial and postcolonial) through national and transnational currents in the British, Danish, Dutch, French, and Spanish Caribbean Islands. The course is designed for students with particular interests in Latin American history, Pan-American history, the history of the African Diaspora, the history of immigration, and comparative cultural studies. It is cross-listed with African American Studies (IDIS) and will be cross-listed with Latin American/Latino Studies (LALS).

History 39400 ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 
Cr. 3
This is a mid-level survey designed to provide students of environmental science with historical background and to provide students of history with the unique perspective of environmental historians. No prerequisites.

History 39500 JUNIOR RESEARCH SEMINAR 
Cr. 3 
This is a variable title course and content will vary with instructor teaching the course.

History 39600 THE AFRO-AMERICAN TO 1865 
Cr. 3
This course is designed to introduce students to the trends, events, issues, and people that shaped African American history from its West and Central African roots to the Civil War. In particular, this course will focus on presenting black people as active agents in the American historical narrative that significantly shaped the course of their own lives even within the context of slavery. To this end, this course sets out to discredit American myths about people of African descent, examine key elements of black slavery and freedom in the United States, analyze the slave experience with special emphasis on black resistance and resiliency, and identify the economic, political, and social factors that shaped and were shaped by African slaves, their descendants, black communities and institutions, and plantation society.

History 39800 THE AFRO-AMERICAN SINCE 1865 
Cr. 3
The history of Afro-Americans since 1865 to the present. Their struggles to overcome social, economic, and political oppression and to win basic civil and human rights while making valuable contributions to American society are emphasized.

General prerequisite for all history courses numbered 400 to 499: sophomore standing or consent of instructor.

History 40000 GREAT BOOKS AND THE SEARCH FOR MEANING
Cr. 3
This intellectual-history course discusses the meanings of the Great Books within their particular historical contexts and teh universal quest for self-understanding, focusing on good and evil; mystery and reason; the nature of power; and what it means to be human.

History 40300 EUROPE IN THE REFORMATION 
Cr. 3
Between 1450 and 1650 Europeans experienced religious upheaval of unprecedented proportions. Heresies there had always been, but rival churches to the once universal Christian Church signaled a sundered Christendom that many contemporaries believed could only end in punishment from God. But religious conflict, important as it was, was only part of the "disorder" that marked the experience of Europeans. Economic transformation, social mobility, unprecedented poverty and vagrancy, rebellion, and war all conspired with religious upheaval to make this epoch an age of anxiety. To fathom these earth-shattering changes, we will search for interconnections between and among these historical phenomena, using interdisciplinary methodology (like psychology and cultural anthropology) at times to aid in our interpretation of what happened during this epoch and why. In the process, we will explore the many minor paradoxes and the one great contradiction that marks these two hundred years: why Europeans were obsessed with a search for order in an age of perceived chaos.


History 40400 KINGS AND PHILOSOPHERS: EUROPE 1618-1789 
Cr. 3
The study of this period of European history focuses on the establishment and organization of the system of dynastic autocracy, from the Thirty Years War to the French Revolution. The emphasis of the course is on the system of monarchical absolutism epitomized by the reign of Louis XIV—its practice in Spain, Prussia, Austria and Russia, its effects on individual states at home and internationally, and its transformation during the eighteenth century by the ideas of the Enlightenment.

This period offers a classical case of a state-system in which the interests of royal dynasties determined the policy of state. It is a period of constant war, which does not prevent economic advancement; it is a period of heightened autocracy which does not prevent philosophical enlightenment. In many ways the mother country for both absolutism and the enlightenment is France whose intellectual, political and economic developments influenced almost every other continental country. Therefore, greatest stress is placed upon her development, while at the same time emphasis is given to the interaction of policy with all the countries of Europe.

History 40500 THE FRENCH REVOLUTION AND NAPOLEON 
Cr. 3
This course intends to acquaint students with the major events of the French Revolution and Napoleonic era (roughly 1789 to 1815), and introduce them to recent developments in the ways that historians view this decisive (and action-packed) period. Topics we will address include the following: the Old Regime and the origins of revolution, widening political participation of the masses and previously marginalized social groups, changing aims of revolutionaries, the problem of the king and its bloody resolution, revolutionary culture, the extension of human rights, the tragedy of the Terror, the larger Atlantic revolutionary world, slave revolts and racial equality in the Caribbean, the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte, Napoleon's leadership successes and failures, Napoleon in the world, legacies of the French Revolution and Napoleon. Additionally, students will write a significant research paper using primary and secondary sources and applying what they have learned in class to an original work of scholarship.

History 40600 REBELS AND ROMANTICS: EUROPE 1815 – 1870 
Cr. 3
This course covers European history from the final downfall of Napoleon in 1815 to the Franco-Prussian War of 1870 that led to the creation of the second German empire. Students will learn about topics like industrialization, romanticism, the slow and complicated decline of the aristocracy, the coming to power of the middle class (or bourgeoisie), the formation of the working class, the domestic ideal for women, prostitution, sexuality, masculinity, the Crimean War (1853-56), socialism, the revolutions of 1848, realism, early European imperialism, and the consolidation of the nation-state form.

A premise of the course is that this period witnessed, among other things, a new understanding of the individual and the self, deriving from the revolutionary experiences of the late eighteenth century, and from romanticism. Hence, the course and the final research paper will be orientated to understanding the developments of this era through some of its numerous outstanding personalities, for example, Napoleon Bonaparte, Lord Byron, Frederic Chopin, Queen Victoria, George Sand, Florence Nightingale, William Gladstone, Benjamin Disraeli, Giuseppe Garibaldi, Napoleon III, Friedrich Engels, Karl Marx, Charles Darwin, and Otto von Bismarck.

The objectives of this course are to help students gain an in-depth understanding of this foundational period in the history of the modern West, and to guide them in the research and writing of a historical biography based on primary and secondary sources. To this end the course will consist of assigned readings including both primary and secondary works, frequent class discussions of these readings, lectures that provide the basic historical and biographical facts, selected videos that illustrate the history, and incremental research and writing assignments that will culminate in the final research paper.

History 40700 ROAD TO WORLD WAR I: EUROPE 1870 – 1919 
Cr. 3
This course is a social and cultural history of Europe in the decades prior to World War I and during the war itself. Some unifying themes and issues include the following: modernism; gender and sexuality; race and empire; class and politics; the nature and extent of war as rupture with the past; experiences and memories of war by civilians and combatants. The goal of this course is to engage students in learning and questioning the latest findings and interpretations of this formative period in recent history. Additionally, this course intends to develop students' analytical, verbal communication, and writing skills. To achieve this, students will read and discuss both primary and secondary texts, and view and discuss several media presentations. Lectures will guide students through this body of learning, and add to it. Short papers will be assigned on the readings and media presentations. A research paper will allow student to apply the knowledge and debates covered in class to their own, original research, and to write history themselves.

History 40800 DICTATORSHIP AND DEMOCRACY: EUROPE 1919-1945 
Cr. 3
This course examines the fleeting triumph of democracy across Europe, followed by the rise of fascism, communism, and Nazism. Emphasis will be placed on broad economic, social, and cultural transformations as well as individual choices to resist or conform.

History 41005 HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY
Cr. 3
Using a historical perspective, examines the shifting role of the presidency in the American imagination and the cultural, social, and economic changes that have wrought political developments in public functions and expectations of the modern presidency.

History 41100 THE FOUR HORSEMEN RIDE: CRISIS AND CHANGE IN EUROPE, 1300-1648 

Cr. 3
Upper-division history course on the history of various crises in late medieval and early modern Europe and the changes those crises wrought upon society. Topics include: famine, The Black Death and demographic upheavals, the Hundred Years' War, religious schism, prophecy and divination, apocalyptic expectations, the fracturing of Christendom, new technologies and social change, conflict between Catholics and Protestants, The Thirty Years' War.

History 41200 THE CULTURAL HISTORY OF THE MIDDLE AGES 
Cr. 3
"Culture," for the purpose of this course, is defined as a body of shared opinions, procedures, and concepts of man and the world. Thus, in addition to the usual philosophic, artistic, and theological expressions of cultural history narrowly conceived, this course considers a variety of medieval cultures. Particular attention is given to the cultural life of Barbarians, aristocrats, monks and to such cultural topics as the evolution of Western education, the images and roles of men, women, and children in early European history, the function of intellectual elites in medieval society, and to the tension between Classical culture and the new forms of the Middle Ages.

History 41300 EUROPE IN THE AGE OF EMPIRES
Cr. 3
This course examines the expansion, transformation, and collapse of 19th and 20th century European empires, focusing on colonial encounters and relationships.  Students should come to the course familiar with major developments, events, and themes in modern European and/or global history.

History 41505 GENDER AND POLITICS IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE
Cr. 3
This course explores the role of gender (its discourse as well as its practice) in the emergence, consolidation, and centralization of European political systems from the Renaissance to the French Revolution, such as princely courts, republics and monarchies.
There are no pre-requisites for this course.

History 41800 EUROPEAN SOCIETY AND CULTURE, 1450-1800

Cr. 3
This course will examine European society and culture from 1450-1800. We will explore marriage and the family, sexuality, social status and civility, gender relations, witchcraft, poverty, violence, work and the everyday economy, and resistance and accommodation to political authority.

History 42100 HONORS HISTORICAL METHODS 
Cr. 3
Designed as a prequel to History 422 (Honors Thesis); this course introduces the Honors students to various advanced interpretative approaches to history and methods of historical research. Students also choose their topic for their Honors Thesis and begin research.

History 42200 HONORS THESIS IN HISTORICAL RESEARCH 
Cr. 3
Designed as a sequel to History 421 (Honors Historical Methods); this course is intended as the culminating academic experience for students in the Department of History Honors Program. It will require the completion of an undergraduate thesis in history.

History 42300 ADVANCED TOPICS IN MODERN GERMANY
Cr. 3
This course offers a reading-intensive study of a specific period or theme in modern German History. Semester-long topics might include Imperial Germany; Weimar Germany; Divided Germany (1945-1990); or a thematic studies on culture, religion, or military affairs.

History 42700 HISTORY OF SPAIN AND PORTUGAL 
Cr. 3
"Spain is Different" goes the tourist slogan, but does Europe end at the Pyrenees? The Iberian peninsula has played a major role in shaping the events of Western History yet often receives scant attention. This survey course is designed to introduce the student to the major themes of Iberian history from the era of Roman domination to the present. Because of their global importance, some historical topics (e.g., cooperation and conflict between Christian and Moorish kingdoms, the age of Discovery and Empire, the Spanish Civil War and franquismo, and the challenge of a fragile democracy) will be treated more fully than others.

History 43000 WOMEN IN AFRICAN HISTORY 
Cr. 3
African women's history is rich and deeply layered. In this course, we will examine the social, political, economic, religious, and cultural experiences of women living in Africa. Although we will look at women in the pre-colonial and slave trade eras, the focus will be on women during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Much of our reading and discussion will consider not only women, but also gender as we think about women's interactions with men and children. This course is concerned with the historical forces shaping African women's lives, as well as with the ways in which women have been active agents in the making of their own histories. Students can expect to engage with a number of different types of texts (e.g. films, novels, scholarly analyses, and primary sources).

History 43900 COMMUNIST CHINA 
Cr. 3
This course in the history of Chinese Communism concerns the Communist movement, as seen through the activities of the Communist Party established in 1921, and the Communist government from 1949 to the present. Ideological factors are given considerable attention, both to explain the roots of Marxism—Leninism in China and Party disputes that have caused internal conflict over policies. Approximately one-third of the course is devoted to the period of the Party movement and the remainder to the Communist government. In addition to political affairs, special attention is given to economic, social and cultural changes that have taken place under Chinese Communism. It is intended that this course will serve to give interested students a full survey of the Communist experience in China. Audio-visual aids, such as films, slides, and tape-recorded interviews with specialists who have been to China, are utilized in the course.

History 44100 AFRICA IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 
Cr. 3
This course analyzes the origins and growth of African nationalism against the background of traditional African state systems, the coming of European colonial rule, and twentieth century international politics. Great African leaders of the 20th century, including Kwame Nkrumaly Jomo Kenyatta, Seretse Khama, Leopold Sedar Senghor and Nelson Mandela receive detailed attention. The course takes a regional approach, focusing on South, Central and East Africa. It avoids heavy textbook reading assignments in favor of selected paperback readings and class discussions on problem-oriented topics of the student's choice. No prerequisites are required; the course is designed to appeal not only to history majors, but to students (with or without previous knowledge of Africa) from all departments of the University.

History 45000 THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE: INTEGRATING HISTORY, HORTICULTURE & LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE (HORT 450, LA 450) 
Cr. 3
Intensive four-weeks in-residence in Corsham, UK with visits to significant sites to examine the intersections between human culture and the natural environment that results in the developed landscape. Maymester only. No prerequisites but permission of instructors required.

History 45500 MODERN IRAQ
Cr. 3
This course focuses on Iraq's formation as a modern state, and it addresses the following periods: Ottoman Mesopotomia (1908-1920), Colonial Iraq (1915-1932), the Monarchy (1932-1958), Revolutionary Iraq (1958-1968), and Baathist Iraq (1968-2003), the Iraq War (2003-2008).

History 46000 AMERICAN COLONIAL HISTORY 
Cr. 3
This lecture/discussion course examines the social, political, economic, and cultural development of England’s mainland American colonies roughly from the founding of Virginia to the middle of the eighteenth century. It explores motivations for colonization, expectations of colonizers, challenges encountered in the American wilderness, and relations between settlers and their British overlords. It also studies the cultural interactions between the settlers and the diverse peoples from non-English societies, including the many native Americans and Africans—both free and slave. The class considers the private as well as the public lives of early Americans, paying close attention to the hopes and realities of men, women, and children of the “lower,” “middling,” and “better” sorts. The primary goals are for students to gain a general understanding of the major challenges and opportunities that the peoples of early America faced and to appreciate the interpretative problems historians encounter in explaining the period. Through a semester-long research project, students sharpen their research skills as they sift through evidence to answer questions that they pose about early America.

History 46100 THE REVOLUTIONARY ERA, 1763 TO 1800 
Cr. 3
When the Eighteenth-Century opened, the British colonies on the North American mainland were loyal dependencies enjoying the protection of the world’s strongest imperial power. When the century closed, the colonies had thrown off British rule along with monarchy itself and transformed themselves into a united, independent republic. This course explores that transformation. It is a story of how thirteen colonies, separated by religious, ethnic, economic, and cultural differences, came together to make common cause and create an independent republic. Gaining independence, however, was the beginning, not the end of the American Revolution, which centered on the struggle for who would rule in the United States.  This class concludes, therefore, by examining the process of state-building from the earliest state constitutional conventions of 1776 to the Constitutional Convention of 1787. Many voices contribute to the story of the American Revolution: men and women, prosperous merchants and planters and struggling day laborers and tenant farmers, African-Americans and Native-Americans, Loyalists and Patriots, and generals and privates. Through reading primary sources and scholarly monographs, students will examine the events of the period and the various meanings that contemporaries and subsequent generations have assigned them.

History 46300 CREATION OF AMERICAN LEGAL CULTURE 
Cr. 3
The "Founding Fathers" wrote a Constitution riddled with compromise language, maddeningly brief, and often imprecise. How did early Americans erect a working civil society, with courts and policemen, laws and procedures, on the foundation of that constitutional framework?

History 46700 THE EMERGENCE OF MODERN AMERICA 

Cr. 3
This course will examine the years after the Civil War, from 1865 to 1900, a period in which Americans witnessed unprecedented economic expansion that profoundly altered political and social arrangements. We will explore how the nation "recovered" from the Civil War, how it reconstructed itself, and continued to define the notion of who was an American and who was not. In short, we will examine how the nation transitioned from one divided to the threshold of world domination in the age of imperialism. The principal themes of the class will be the reconstruction of the "American" nation, conquest of the West, the causes and consequences of industrialization and urbanization, and the beginnings of national popular culture. We will examine how capitalists, workers, farmers, politicians, reformers, the middle class, and different races attempted to shape the new industrial society to their own purposes and visions. The course is open to all undergraduates. There are no prerequisites.

History 46800 RECENT AMERICAN HISTORY 
Cr. 3
This course examines the issues that shaped American society, politics, foreign policy, and culture from 1932 to the present. It covers the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, and the Vietnam War, as well as the social, cultural, and economic impact of those events.

History 46900 BLACK CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT 
Cr. 3
This course will examine the origins, dynamics, and consequences of the modern black civil rights movement by exploring how struggles for racial equality and full citizenship worked to dismantle entrenched systems of segregation, repression, and discrimination within American society and culture.

History 47005 WOMEN AND HEALTH IN AMERICA
Cr. 3
This course examines the historical relationship between women and health by exploring a number of critical themes that have affected women's health in the United States.

History 47100 HISTORY OF THE GREAT PLAINS INDIANS 

Cr. 3
The History of the Great Plains Indians examines Native American life on the great plains from before European contact to the current era. The thematic emphasis is on Native American perspectives, including an introduction to the interdisciplinary methodologies used in the field. Students will be introduction to analytical frameworks that emphasize culture, gender and environment as well as political and economic analyses. After a brief contextual introduction to the major events and themes in Plains Indian history, the course will focus on several groups from the northern and southern plains to allow students the opportunity to examine and analyze specific historical issues and topics as they related to different Indian nations. An emphasis will also be placed on identifying and analyzing major historiographical themes in the indigenous history in the United States.

History 47200 HISTORY OF MEXICO 
Cr. 3
A history of the Mexican people from the pre-Columbian period to the present. (The course begins with a survey of the Indian civilizations, the Spanish conquest, and the social, intellectual, economic, and political aspects of the colonial period. Attention is then directed to the movement for independence, attempts at constitutional government, war of the reform, the French invasion, and the period of Diaz). Special emphasis is placed on the successful social revolution that led to the development of today's dynamic nation.

History 47300 HISTORY OF THE SOUTH 
Cr. 3
The History of the South focuses on the development of slavery in the South and the reasons why Southerners maintained the institution after it was abolished in the North. The course emphasizes how the presence of slavery combined with other developments to mold a distinct civilization in the South, and why Southerners felt that their best chance to preserve their "institutions" was to secede from the Union. The impact on the South of this miscalculation and the Civil War and Reconstruction that followed is traced. The South's distinctness was perpetuated despite the abolition of slavery, and the course examines how the South developed after the Civil War as well as the South's impact upon national politics and culture, particularly in the twentieth century. The course devotes special attention to leading Southern thinkers and politicians (such as Thomas Jefferson, John Calhoun, Woodrow Wilson, and Huey Long), Southern literature, and Southern segregation and racial problems.

History 47500 THE SPANISH FRONTIER IN NORTH AMERICA 
Cr. 3
The usual narrative of United States History traces the westward march of English-speaking Americans across the North American continent. Yet, well before the dramatic expansion of Anglo-America, subjects of Spain had explored widely and had established permanent settlements from Florida to California, regions that are now part of the United States. In History 475 we will examine the era of Spanish sovereignty in North America, an often-overlooked dimension of our national history that nevertheless spans roughly three centuries. Collectively and individually, we will study the experiences the Hispanic settlers who forged lives on the frontier, consider their interactions with indigenous peoples, examine the institutions upon which their societies rested, and reflect upon the historical legacy of the Spanish colonial period.

History 47600 THE CIVIL WAR IN MYTH AND MEMORY 
Cr. 3
This seminar will explore how the Civil War has been celebrated and/or remembered from 1865 to the present. We will look at both Union and Confederate (northern and southern), black and white, male and female interpretations of the war. We will focus on how participants of the war understood their own lives, how their descendants chose to remember the war, and how historians have used their writings in crafting contemporary understandings of the Civil War. We will ask such questions as which interpretations of the war were most salient at different times? In what ways were memorialization efforts political? What has been left out of the popular memory of the war? Why? In order to do so, we will examine such topics as death culture in the 19th century, art, construction of personal memoirs, monument building, battlefield preservation, veterans' associations, and film depictions of the war.

History 47700 NATIVE AMERICAN WOMEN'S HISTORY 
Cr. 3
This course thematically explores the history of Native American women in North America. Students will explore the experiences of Native American women from earliest contact with European colonization to the present. The course will also cover thematic threads of resistance and resilience exploring how Native American women became the culture keepers for their peoples. Topics will include colonization and decolonization, identity, sovereignty, activism, leadership, kinship, stereotypes and public images.

History 47900 AMERICAN REPRESENTATIONS OF THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA
Cr. 3
This course explores Arab-American relations over the past 300 years, using American writings on the Middle East and North Africa as a prism for viewing evolving conceptions of national identity and global power in the United States.

History 48005  MADNESS AND THE ASYLUM IN THE U.S.
Cr. 3
This course explores how Americans have understood insanity and asylums.  We analyze historical concepts of insanity, the evolution of asylums, how psychiatrists have debated therapeutics, and how ordinary people have experienced treatments and diagnoses.

History 48500 TOPICS IN AMERICAN POLITICAL HISTORY 
Cr. 3
This course deals with broad thematic and chronologically defined topics in American political history from the Revolutionary Era to the late twentieth century. Content will vary with the faculty member teaching the class.

History 48800 HISTORY OF SEXUAL REGULATION IN THE UNITED STATES
Cr. 3
This course will illuminate broad themes in the historical regulation of sexual violence, consensual sex, and homosexuality.  Students will understand and analyze how cultural, social, religious, and moral ideologies have influenced conceptions of deviant and normative sexuality in the United States.

History 49200 SEMINAR IN HISTORICAL TOPICS 
Cr. 3 
*Restricted to undergraduates; 20 students maximum. This is a variable title course and the course description will vary according to specific topic proposed to study.

History 49400 SCIENCE AND SOCIETY IN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 
Cr. 3
This course examines the development of science in the United States from colonial times to the present. Emphasis in the earlier periods is placed on comparison and contrast of the American scene with that of Europe. Subsequent treatment deals with the technological aspects of industrialization, and maturation of the American scientific community, and the increasing social effects of science and technology. Among those considered are the forces making for urbanization, for greater interdependence among science, industry and government, and for repercussions in intellectual affairs. 

History 49500 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN HISTORICAL TOPICS 
Cr. 3
 *Restricted to undergraduates; 15 student maximum. This course is designed to train history majors in the fundamentals of historical research and writing. Course descriptions vary according to specific topics proposed for study by instructors.

History 49900 HISTORY INTERNSHIP 
Cr. 3 Prerequisite: 12 credits of history and 2.8 GPA in history courses.
This course allows students to earn credit for internships. Examples of qualified internships would include work with museums, historical societies and various units of government. Credit and course requirements arranged with the instructor. 

500-level courses are dual level - undergraduate & graduate courses. General prerequisites for all history courses numbered from 500 to 599; junior, senior or graduate standing; or consent of instructor, Department Head and Graduate Dean. 

History 50000 STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY 
Cr. 3
First Semester: This course will study the emergence of a new European civilization after the demise of the classical world. The course opens with a consideration of the fourth and fifth century Barbarian invasions and their significance for European history. Considerable attention will be directed to the new elements (cultural, political, artistic, religious and social) of the post-Invasion European world. The course ends with a consideration of the new Europe's fate in face of the Magyar, Viking, and Saracen invasions of the ninth and tenth centuries. The course will be based upon common readings and visual sources illustrative of the early medieval period. There will be a mid-term exam as well as a final. 

Second Semester: The focus of this semester's work will be on the growing complexification of European life during the tenth through the fourteenth centuries. The adjustment to a more sophisticated, populated, and urban civilization was fraught with conflict. The course will single out several areas of conflict for special attention: morality, church and state relations, warfare, theatre and entertainment, established religion and heresy, schools and scholars. Common readings will be supplemented by visual material. There will be a mid-term as well as a final. 

History 50500 GHOSTS GLOBAL CULTURE
Cr. 3
This reading and writing intensive course will be a survey of ghost-lore across cultures.  It will study ghost-stories and theologies about the after-life, along with practices such as funerals, in order to understand the changing nature of fear in society. 

History 51100 ENGLAND UNDER THE TUDORS 
Cr. 3
This course, designed for both graduate and undergraduate students, examines English society from the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485 to the death of Queen Elizabeth in 1603. Students will follow developments such as the evolution of English kingship from feudal overlordship to Renaissance Prince; the changing religious climate from medieval Catholicism to Reformation Protestantism; the growth of parliament; the changing nature of warfare; and England's entry into era of European expansionism. This class is also concerned with themes of family live, love, marriage, death, folk culture and literacy, and Renaissance culture and learning.

History 51200 ENGLAND UNDER THE STUARTS 
Cr. 3
This course is an examination of the history of England during the period of the Stuart dynasty, 1603-1714.  We begin, however, by exploring the events and unresolved issues created by the English Reformation in the mid-sixteenth century.  Religious inspiration, disputes, and intense controversy, both political and theological, will play fundamental roles throughout the stormy years of the Stuart monarchs.  Another major focal point will be era of the Civil War, regicide, Revolution, and the Protectorate of Oliver Cromwell. The tumultuous politics of the latter Stuart era will also figure prominently in our investigation as well as the development of modern political ideologies and political parties.  This course is also interested the daily lives of ordinary English people; the roles of class and gender; and popular culture and belief systems.

History 51400 A HISTORY OF WESTERN THOUGHT I 
Cr. 3
History 514 opens by sketching the evolution of Greek thought from mythic to philosophical, historical, and scientific forms, attempting as it does so to relate these changes to concurrent social, political and economic developments. The presocratic philosophers receive considerable attention to this connection. Next comes an account of the systems of Plato and Aristotle, with particular emphasis on their social and political views. Attention to developments in the Hellenistic and early Roman periods center around evolving new relationships between religion, science, philosophy and political opinion. The remainder of the course takes up the rise and development of Christianity, including a consideration of its origins, the factors making for its success, the constriction of both Christian and pagan learning in the Dark Ages, and the rise and fall of the Scholastic synthesis. 

History 51500 A HISTORY OF WESTERN THOUGHT II 
Cr. 3
History 515 begins with a brief recapitulation of the Medieval inheritance, showing how this tradition was affected by the humanistic studies of the Renaissance and by the religious ferment of the Reformation. The course next deals with the major political and scientific thinkers of the seventeenth century, and with their disciples and popularizers in the Age of Enlightenment. The remainder of the course centers around attempts made in the nineteenth century to codify and perpetuate Enlightenment thought, and on the growing onslaughts against that same thought which have increasingly marked the nineteenth century and our own. Whenever possible the course attempts to relate intellectual developments to underlying social forces. 

History 54800 CONFLICT IN EAST ASIA: TWENTIETH CENTURY 
Cr. 3
This course on modern East Asian diplomatic history is an historical review of the foreign relations of China, Japan, and Korea, both between these nations and collectively with the rest of the world. Emphasis is placed on the internal and external pressures affecting the policies adopted by each country in their foreign relations. The presentation of material is so constructed as to stress East Asian views in explaining their courses of action. Thus, in discussing the Western impact on East Asia, the responses of that area to the pressures exerted upon it are analyzed within the context of its own tradition, experience, and power potential. After a brief background discussion of nineteenth century relationships between the countries in this area and their progressively greater involvement in world affairs, the course proceeds to an examination of the participation by China, Japan, and Korea in the shifting alliances and the recurring diplomatic and military crises that developed since the Sino-Japanese War (1894-95). The study is taken up through the diplomacy of Communist China. 

History 57600 PROBLEMS IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY 
Cr. 3
A detailed examination of specific topics in Latin American history. Subjects vary between the colonial and national periods. Intensive historical investigation, reading, and research is conducted into such topics as Church-State relations, regionalism, nationalism, personalism in government, the Black Legend, conquest, colonization, independence, relations between Spaniards and Indians, economic pursuits, traditions and customs, international problems, and contemporary affairs. May be repeated once with a change of topic. 

History 57700 CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICA 
Cr. 3
This course is concerned with the recent history of Latin America with special consideration given to the post-1930 period. Attention is given first to a summary of the period in the early twentieth century followed by the impact of the World Depression. An intensive study follows of the societal structure of Latin America in the contemporary period with emphasis upon population groups generally evident in the region and the dynamic changes that Latin America is experiencing in the last half-century. Specific countries are then studied to investigate personalities, events, developments, and problems peculiar to each country. Specific topics include the role of the military, the changing nature of the Catholic Church, land and population pressures, international relations, revolutionary movements, the influence of ideologies, and current problems in historical perspective. 

History 58500 AMERICAN LABOR HISTORY 
Cr. 3
This course examines the history of work and working people in the United States from the colonial period to the present. It looks at the history of the organized labor movement and the larger processes of social and economic change as these have affected work and workers. Assuming an expanded definition of “labor” that includes but goes beyond wage work in workshops and factories, the course emphasizes the diversity of American work experiences, encompassing for example the lives of enslaved people on plantations and women at home as well as new or relatively unorganized groups such as department store employees, nurses, and migrant farm laborers. And while the work experience receives central attention, the course gives equal consideration to the dimensions of cultural identity, politics and governmental policy, and the structure of the labor market. The history of labor encompasses more than trade unions, labor leaders, notable strikes, and politics. Its domain includes class and culture, ethnicity, race and sex, family and community, and technology and work. Open to advanced undergraduates and to graduate students. No prerequisites.

History 58600 UNITED STATES FOREIGN AFFAIRS TO WORLD WAR I 
Cr. 3
This course explores the central issues and themes of American foreign relations from the colonial period to the First World War.  Our primary focus will be on the expansion of American political, military, economic, and cultural power and influence.  We will anchor our discussions in a narrative history of the period, considering problems such as Americans' relations with Native Americans, the causes and consequences of the early republic's territorial and commercial expansion, the causes and consequences of American imperial expansion in the Caribbean and the Pacific, and the United States' entry into the First World War.  But we will also address recent methodological and interpretive trends that go beyond the traditional concerns of diplomatic historians  We will explore new questions of culture, race, gender, immigration, transnational reform movements, non-state actors, and the possibilities of internationalizing the study of American foreign relations.  Ultimately, we will explore the ways in which we, as historians, can imagine and investigate new interpretive frameworks for this era.

History 58700 U.S. FOREIGN AFFAIRS: WORLD WAR I TO PRESENT 
Cr. 3
An examination of the economic, ideological, and strategic factors that have helped shape American foreign policy during the twentieth century. By focusing on the relationship between domestic concerns and foreign affairs, the course will grapple with the question of how and why the United States became involved in wars and revolutions around the world.

History 59000 DIRECTED READING IN HISTORY 
Cr. 3
This reading course is designed for the advanced student in history who has begun to develop special fields of interest, and who finds that these special interests cannot be satisfied by any of the regular course offerings. It is virtually impossible to list any particular course content, and "ground rules" are variable from instructor to instructor. Since it is a reading course, reports on research papers are emphasized. It is strongly suggested that a student who wishes to establish credit in a reading course have a well-defined idea of what she or he wishes to accomplish before approaching an instructor for permission to enroll in the course and asking for help in planning an appropriate reading program. 

 

History 59400 AFRO-AMERICAN THOUGHT AND IDEOLOGY
Cr. 3
A survey of the principal ideas, ideologies, and intellectual currents in the Afro-American community, with emphasis on the impact of these ideas on American culture. Attention is devoted to the ideologies of major organizations and movements in the Afro-American community, as well as to the principal personalities involved in the shaping of the Afro-American thought. The shifting emphasis on assimilationism, Pan-Africanism, black nationalism (territorial and cultural), and racial awareness is also considered. This course is intended to provide training in the ideologies of the Afro-American community throughout American history, primarily to meet the curriculum needs of the Africana Studies and Research Program, and also to provide an advanced course for students in American Studies and American History who would be interested in the subject. It is intended as a complement to survey courses in African and Afro-American history currently offered in the department, and also the department's offerings in American Intellectual history. 

History 59500 THE HOLOCAUST AND GENOCIDE 
Cr. 3 
The implications of the attempted destruction of European Jewry by the Nazis during the Second World War - what we term the Holocaust - along with millions of Roma (Gypsies), Poles, Russians, homosexuals, the handicapped, and others are terrifyingly far-reaching. Genocide and ethnic cleansing are central to our understanding of the twentieth century, and beyond. This course moves from memory of the Holocaust and its exploration through fiction, intense examination of the complexity of its causes and nature, the white-hot issues of contestation surrounding it, problems and practices of commemoration (including our local Greater Lafayette Holocaust Remembrance Conference www.glhrc.org), to an investigation of comparative genocide, looking especially at the cases of Armenia, Yugoslavia, Rwanda, and Darfur. We will make use of primary sources and secondary literature, fiction, memoirs, film and other media in the course of our examination. This course was originally developed jointly by Professors Mork (History) and Melson (Political Science). PREREQUISITES: ONE 100 LEVEL HISTORY OR POLITICAL SCIENCE COURSE OR CONSENT OF INSTRUCTOR.

600-level courses are graduate-level courses.

History 60100 READING SEMINAR IN EUROPEAN HISTORY
Cr. 3   *May be repeated for credit. *Graduate Standing.
This is a variable title course and content will vary with professor teaching course.

History 60200 SEMINAR IN EUROPEAN HISTORY 
Cr. 3 Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of the instructor. (May be repeated for credit.) Staff
Individual and group study of topics in European history from the medieval period to the modern era. Topics reflect the research, teaching, or historiographical specialties of the faculty offering the course. Subtitles indicate the focus of the research seminar. 

History 61000 HISTORY: THEORY AND METHODS
Cr. 3
History 61000 is a renamed and renumbered version of History 59800," European and American Historiography." This is the first part of an introductory two-course sequence for new graduate students intended to acquaint them with some important issues regarding the modern professional practice of history. This semester concentrates on historiography, theoretical questions, and methodological debates that today's working historians inevitably encounter. Students read about the practice of historical scholarship and read several important example texts representing different approaches to the discipline over the past 200 years. Students write several short book reviews, position papers, and a mock grant proposal during this semester. This course is required of incoming graduate students in history. It usually will be followed by History 61100, Research Practicum.

History 61100 HISTORY: RESEARCH PRACTICUM
Cr. 3
The second half of a two-semester sequence for new graduate students intended to acquaint them with important issues regarding the modern practice of historical scholarship. This course is a research seminar in which students shape and execute their own research projects resulting in original article-length historical essays. In addition, matters relating to ethical conduct of research and problems of historical writing and argumentation are discussed. Prerequisite: History 6100.

History 64100 READING SEMINAR IN GLOBAL HISTORY 
Cr. 3 Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Staff
Individual and group study of topics in global history. Topics reflect the research, teaching or historiographic specialties of the faculty offering the course. Subtitles indicate the focus of the research seminar. 

History 64200 SEMINAR IN GLOBAL HISTORY 
Cr. 3 Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Staff
Individual and group study of topics in global history. Topics reflect the research, teaching or historiographic specialties of the faculty offering the course. Subtitles indicate the focus of the research seminar. 

History 65000 TEACHING THE HISTORY SURVEY COURSE 
Cr. 3
This course provides an introduction to the literature on teaching history at the college level, especially the literature on pedagogy, theory, and conceptualization needed for the undergraduate survey course. Students will become familiar with the professional literature, develop their own syllabus for the survey course, and produce an extensive historiographical essay supporting and justifying the contents of the syllabus. Class discussions will expose students to a number of teaching strategies, concepts, and exercises. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor required. 

History 65100 READING SEMINAR IN AMERICAN HISTORY 
Cr. 3 Prerequisite: graduate standing. (May be repeated for credit.) Staff
Bibliography and historiography of selected fields or topics in American history: may vary in subject matter from semester to semester. 

History 65200 SEMINAR IN AMERICAN HISTORY 
Cr. 3 Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of the instructor. (May be repeated for credit.) Staff
Individual and group study of topics in American history from the colonial period to the present. Topics reflect the research, teaching, or historiographical specialties of the faculty offering the course. Subtitles indicate the focus of the research seminar. 

History 66500 SEMINAR ON AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY 
Cr. 3 (May be repeated for credit.)
Individual research and group study of selected topics dealing with American Indian history from the pre-Columbian period to the present. 

History 67000 SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY 
Cr. 3 (May be repeated for credit.)
Research or reading seminar in Latin American History. Individual research, group study, and class presentations on a selected topic in colonial or national period of Latin American History. Topics vary. May be repeated once for credit with change of topic. 

History 69800 RESEARCH, M.A. THESIS 

History 69900 RESEARCH, PH.D. THESIS 

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