Spring 2010

Promoted from Clinical Assistant Professor to Clinical Associate Professor

Jennifer Simpson

Clinical Associate Professor, Speech, Language, Hearing Sciences

jsible@purdue.edu

Jennifer Simpson

Jennifer M. Simpson received her Master's degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder and her Doctorate in Audiology (AuD) from the University of Florida.  She is a clinical audiologist in the Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences Department.

Dr. Simpson provides clinical audiology services (evaluations and treatment options) to infants, young children and adults in the M.D. Steer Audiology clinic on the Purdue University campus.  She also teaches clinical skills to audiology graduate students in their first, second and third years in the AuD program. 

Dr. Simpson is the Medical Center Liaison to Indiana University (IU) Medical Center in Indianapolis.  In this position, Dr. Simpson meets regularly with the fourth students and the 16-18 clinical educators at the IU Medical Center, providing administrative support, participating in program management, and providing input into the process of clinical education.

She also teaches the course Audiology Practice Management, offering an introduction to the business aspects of starting and maintaining an audiology practice. 

She is an active member of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), as a member of the Council of Clinical Specialty Recognition (CCSR), a member of special interest division Administration and Supervision, and a column editor for the journal Perspectives.

Dr. Simpson holds a certificate of clinical competence from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and a state license from Indiana in Audiology. She is a member of the American Academy of Audiology (AAA) and the Indiana Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ISHA). Additionally, she is also an Indiana First Steps certified early intervention provider for children from birth to three years of age.

Her interests include early identification and intervention of infants and children with hearing loss, clinical education, and administration of the AuD program.

 


Promoted from Research Assistant Professor to Research Associate Professor

Robert Phillips

Research Associate Professor, Psychological Sciences

rphillip@psych.purdue.edu

Robert Phillips

Robert J. Phillips received his Ph.D. in Psychology with a specialization in Neuroscience from Purdue University in 2000 and joined the faculty at Purdue in 2006 as a Research Assistant Professor. In addition to being a member of the Department of Psychological Sciences, he is also a faculty associate in the Center on Aging and the Life Course and a member of the Ingestive Behavior Research Center. Dr. Phillips' research, supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the USDA, focuses on the autonomic nerve circuits with which the brain coordinates gastrointestinal tract functions and regulates food intake. Recently, he has concentrated on how these nerve circuits change and become impaired with age. Phillips' focus on the aging of the circuitry controlling digestion and ingestion addresses important health problems of the elderly and simultaneously provides a unique perspective to better understand the neural pathways that control food intake.

 


Promoted from Assistant Professor to Associate Professor

Michele Buzon

Associate Professor, Anthropology

mbuzon@purdue.edu

Michele Buzon

Michele Buzon received her PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2004. Her dissertation research, supported by the National Science Foundation and the Institute for Bioarchaeology, focused on the biological consequences of contact between the ancient Nubian and Egyptian populations during the colonial New Kingdom period at the site of Tombos, located in northern Sudan. Her work offered an opportunity to learn more about an important, but little-studied segment of people, the non-elite. Buzon argues that based on the heterogeneous cranial morphology and varied ethnic identities portrayed through archaeological indications of burial ritual, it is clear Tombos was comprised of a biologically and ethnically mixed group of people who used cultural symbols in advantageous ways. The individuals at Tombos were affected by many similar disease conditions experienced by other contemporary Nile Valley populations but displayed a very low level of traumatic injuries associated with interpersonal violence, which may reflect a change in Egyptian colonial strategies, shifting from military action to more diplomatic methods. Her continued research using oxygen and strontium isotopic methods, supported by the American Philosophical Society and the Killam Trust, has confirmed the heterogeneous nature of Tombos and has provided important baseline data for future human mobility studies in the region.

Professor Buzon's work has been published in leading journals such as Current Anthropology, American Journal of Physical Anthropology, and Journal of Archaeological Science. Her current work is spatially and temporally expanding her examination of investigation of Nubian and Egyptian sociopolitical developments, culture contact, identity and health. Ongoing fieldwork supported by the National Science Foundation and National Geographic Society is offering exciting, new data regarding the Nubian 'dark age' during the Third Intermediate and Napatan periods.

Professor Buzon teaches courses in biological anthropology, osteology, human variation and evolution, Nile Valley archaeology, and mortuary practices.

 

Elaine Francis

Associate Professor, English

ejfranci@purdue.edu

Elaine Francis

Elaine J. Francis has been in the Department of English and in the Linguistics Program since 2003. Before coming to Purdue, she earned her Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Chicago (1999) and taught for three years in the Department of English at the University of Hong Kong (1999-2002). Her research investigates how syntactic, semantic, and processing factors interact to determine grammatical structure. One component of this research focuses on "category mismatch" (cases in which a noun, verb, or adjective is used to express a concept more typically expressed by a word of a different category), demonstrating the advantages of a multidimensional model of grammar which acknowledges the influence of function on form while maintaining an independent syntactic representation.  A second line of research applies psycholinguistic experimentation and quantitative corpus analysis to extend this theoretical base, linking theories of language structure to theories of human cognition. This research focuses on how cognitive factors limit the kinds of mismatches allowed in language and, conversely, promote the maintenance of certain mismatch structures.  She has published research articles in the journals Cognitive Linguistics, Natural Language and Linguistic Theory, Journal of Linguistics, and Language Sciences.  She is also co-editor with Laura A. Michaelis of Mismatch: Form-function Incongruity and the Architecture of Grammar (CSLI Publications, 2003), as well as co-editor with Salikoko S. Mufwene and Rebecca S. Wheeler of Polymorphous Linguistics: Jim McCawley's Legacy (MIT Press, 2005). She regularly teaches undergraduate courses in introductory linguistics and English grammar, as well as graduate courses in syntax and semantics.

 

Tyler Harrison

Associate Professor, Communication

tharrison@purdue.edu

Tyler Harrison

Tyler Harrison (Ph.D., University of Arizona) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication at Purdue University and a Research Associate with the Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering. His research is concerned with how larger social influences (e.g. media images, organizational relationships) shape interpretation, interaction, decision-making, and collective action. In particular, he is interested in social influence, organizational structure and relationships, and communication design (the activity of transforming what is given into what is preferred through processes of invention and intervention). For the last several years he has largely explored influence, organizing, and communication design processes in two applied areas -- organ donation and conflict management. Across these two contexts, his research has been focused on (a) developing an understanding of features of organizational and interpersonal contexts that can lead to (b) the design of more sophisticated messages and interaction structures that will (c) result in more desirable interpretations, interactions, decisions, and outcomes. He is currently working on projects to: promote organ donation through Division of Motor Vehicle branches; design better dispute resolution systems on college campuses; and analyze media and discourse surrounding the Copenhagen Climate Treaty Conference. His work has been published in journals such as International Journal of Conflict Resolution, Journal of Communication, and Health Communication. He has received over $3.5 million in grant funding by the Department of Health and Human Services for projects he has served on as Principal Investigator or Co-Principal Investigator.

 

Caroline E. Janney

Associate Professor, History

cjanney@purdue.edu

Caroline E. Janney

Caroline E. Janney received her Ph.D. in 2005 from the University of Virginia. Her first book, Burying the Dead but Not the Past: Ladies' Memorial Associations and the Lost Cause (2008) explores the role of white southern women as the creators and purveyors of Confederate tradition in the immediate post-Civil War South. Claiming to be mothers and daughters in mourning and therefore "apolitical," women of the Ladies' Memorial Associations (LMAs) sought to escape charges of treason in their establishment of Confederate cemeteries, Memorial Days, and monuments. Members of LMAs not only helped establish and entrench Confederate traditions, but they also composed the first systematic and enduring organizations of southern white women twenty to thirty years before the establishment of national groups such as the Women's Christian Temperance Union and the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

Professor Janney's second book, a volume in the Littlefield History of the Civil War Era (University of North Carolina Press), will examine the origins, challenges to, and impact of Civil War memory from the 1860s through the 1930s.

Professor Janney's work has been published in leading journals such as Civil War History and the Journal of Southern History (forthcoming February 2011). Her article on the reconciliationist efforts of LaSalle Corbell Pickett, widow of Gen. George E. Pickett, won the William M. E. Rachal Award for the best overall article in the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography during 2008.

Professor Janney teaches courses on the Civil War, Civil War memory, U.S. women's history, and the Gilded Age.

 

Tara Johnson

Associate Professor, English

tarastar@purdue.edu

Tara Johnson

Tara Star Johnson received her Ph.D. in Language and Literacy Education from the University of Georgia in 2005. She taught for a year at Georgia Southern University before joining Purdue's English and Curriculum & Instruction departments. Her six years' experience in public schools informs her primary teaching responsibility: preparing preservice English teachers for the profession. An overarching theme in Tara's teaching and research is the intersections among race, class, gender, and sexuality as they pertain to educational contexts. In particular, she focuses on the effect these identity categories have upon teacher-student relationships. This interest is also central to her service as co-chair of the Conference on English Education's Commission on Social Justice in Teacher Education Programs.

Distillations of Tara's dissertation study resulted in the National Council of Teachers of English Promising Researcher Award in 2007; a book, From Teacher to Lover: Sex Scandals in the Classroom; and several journal articles, one of which is featured in Teachers College Record's video web companion, The Voice. Thus far Tara has studied, from a post-structural feminist perspective, how and why inappropriate teacher-student relationships happen; now she is exploring solutions for the issue.

 

Brian Kelly

Associate Professor, Anthropology and Sociology

bckelly@purdue.edu

Brian Kelly

Brian C Kelly received his Ph.D. in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University. He currently is appointed in both the Department of Sociology and the Department of Anthropology at Purdue. He has spent much of his career studying health issues among young people, with a primary focus on drug abuse and sexual health, particularly within the context of youth subcultures.

Brian has five main on-going research projects. He is currently conducting a multi-methods study of prescription drug abuse young adults funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The study is focused on social and cultural factors underlying prescription drug use among urban young adults who participate in youth subcultures. Brian is also directing a study focused on the key dimensions of drug use practices and HIV risk behaviors among methamphetamine users in China's Hunan province. This project is also funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and addresses two major emerging health epidemics in China. Brian is currently collaborating with Purdue colleague Prof. Jeni Loftus on a study focused on the physical and mental health of adolescent girls who date older males. He is also study the influence of neighborhood and social network factors on the health of gay men. His latest project is entitled Brian Kelly rocks the mic like a dope mc.

Brian has authored or co-authored over two dozen publications in social science and public health journals including, the Sociology of Health & Illness, American Journal of Public Health, Addictive Behaviors, Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Rambo the Dog Foray, and the Journal of Urban Health. He is also currently completing his first book Dancing with Risk: The Logic of Clubs, Drugs, & Risk among 21st Century Youth. In 2008, he was honored with the Outstanding Junior Scholar Award by the Drinking & Drugs Division of the Society for the Study of Social Problems. Let's Go Mets.

 

Christopher Lukasik

Associate Professor, English

clukasik@purdue.edu

 

Christopher J. Lukasik earned his B.A. in English and B.F.A. in Painting at the University of Illinois, his M.A. in English from the University of Washington, and his Ph.D. in English from Johns Hopkins University. He joined the Department of English in 2005. Prior to his appointment at Purdue, he was an Assistant Professor of English and American Studies at Boston University, where he also served as Director of Undergraduate Studies for American Studies. Professor Lukasik's research and publications focus on the literary and visual cultural history of the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Atlantic world. His book, Discerning Characters: The Culture of Appearance in Early America will be published by the University of Pennsylvania Press as part of the McNeil Center for Early American Studies book series. Discerning Characters has received fellowship awards from a number of research institutions, including long-term awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Antiquarian Society, the Boston University Humanities Foundation, and the Purdue Research Foundation. He has published seven articles in venues such as Early American Literature, New England Quarterly, and Blackwell's A Companion To American Fiction, 1780-1865. Professor Lukasik has won numerous teaching awards at both the undergraduate and graduate levels and, most recently, he received a Fulbright Scholar Grant to lecture on transnational and interdisciplinary approaches to American literature at the University of the Philippines. Since 2008, he has served as Director of Undergraduate Studies in the American Studies program where he has led CLA faculty in developing a new undergraduate curriculum.

 

Mahalakshmi Sivasankar

Associate Professor, Speech, Language, Hearing Sciences

msivasankar@purdue.edu

Mahalakshmi Sivasankar

Mahalakshmi Sivasankar has a Ph.D. in Communication Sciences and Disorders from Northwestern University. She is a certified Speech-Language Pathologist and is licensed to practice in the state of Indiana. Professor Sivasankar's research which has been funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Speech and Hearing Foundation focuses on the vocal mechanism and voice disorders. Her research program explores the causes of voice disorders and seeks to develop treatments for this common clinical condition. Professor Sivasankar's laboratory is active in the mentoring and training of doctoral and undergraduate students. She teaches an undergraduate course in the Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism and graduate courses in Voice Disorders and Traumatic Brain Injury.

 

Dawn Stinchcomb

Associate Professor, Foreign Languages and Literature

stinchcomb@purdue.edu

 

DAWN F STINCHCOMB joined the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures in 2004. Her research interests in the context of culture transcend topics of race and gender to include the complex issues of sexuality in national identity and culture in the literature and culture of Latin America. Although she has presented her research in several countries including Mexico, Panama, and Costa Rica and has done research in Brazil, Dr. Stinchcomb's scholarship focuses primarily on the literature and cultures of the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and Cuba. Her work often questions the absence of Afro-Hispanic literature from literary anthologies. Her 2004 monograph, The Development of Literary Blackness in the Dominican Republic proposed to explain how literature played a role in the formation of Dominican national identity during the late 19th century.

Dr. Stinchcomb has participated in two Summer Institutes sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities that focused on Afro-Hispanic literature that only further motivated her to promote the integration of the literature written by Hispanic writers of African descent in undergraduate courses. She is currently writing a second monograph that reflects her research on the female Afro Cuban writers and filmmakers since the Cuban Revolution.

 

Philip Troped

Associate Professor, Health and Kinesiology

ptroped@purdue.edu

Philip Troped

Dr. Philip Troped received his Ph.D. in health promotion, education, and behavior from the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina. His research interests include environmental and policy determinants of physical activity, design and evaluation of physical activity interventions, and objective measurement of physical activity with accelerometers and portable global positioning system (GPS) units. He currently is the Principal Investigator on a National Cancer Institute-funded study investigating the influence of the neighborhood built environment on physical activity and obesity among older women living in Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and California. His work has also been funded by the Active Living Research Program (The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in epidemiology, health behavior theories, and physical activity and public health.

 


Promoted from Associate Professor to Professor

Linda Bergmann

Professor, English

lbergmann@purdue.edu

Linda Bergmann

Linda Bergmann joined the Purdue English Department in 2001 and was appointed Director of the Purdue Writing Lab in 2003. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, and has previously taught and directed writing programs at the University of Missouri-Rolla (renamed Missouri Universality of Science and Technology), the Illinois Institute of Technology, and Hiram College. She has been a visiting professor at Sabanci University in Istanbul and a consultant for the American University of Beirut and the University of the Middle East in Kuwait. She teaches primarily graduate seminars in the Rhetoric and Composition program.

Professor Bergmann has published over twenty articles on topics including personal narrative, Writing Across the Curriculum, and other aspects of teaching and understanding writing in such journals as Language and Learning Across the Disciplines, Feminist Teacher, A/B: Auto/Biography Studies, and Works and Days and as chapters in edited collections. She is co-editor of Composition and/or Literature: The End(s) of Education (NCTE Press, 2006). Her textbook on research writing, Academic Research and Writing: Inquiry and Argument in College (Longman/Pearson), was released in the fall of 2009. She is an elected member of the Executive Council of the Conference on College Composition and Communication and of the Delegate Assembly of the Modern Language Association.

 

Evelyn Blackwood

Professor, Anthropology

blackwood@purdue.edu

Evelyn Blackwood

Evelyn Blackwood received her PhD from Stanford University in sociocultural anthropology. She is Professor in the Department of Anthropology and affiliated faculty with Women's Studies, American Studies and Asian Studies at Purdue University. Author of numerous journal articles and books, Dr. Blackwood investigates the critical intersections where localized, state and transnational processes meet individual understandings and experiences of gender, sexuality, selfhood and kinship. She explores these topics through two related areas of ethnographic research, the study of a matrilineal society in West Sumatra, Indonesia and the study of the social construction of sexualities and genders, focused on Indonesia and the United States.

Dr. Blackwood's intensive field-based research on the matrilineal Minangkabau of West Sumatra, Indonesia, explored social change in a rural farm community and resulted in her first monograph, entitled Webs of Power: Women, Kin and Community in a Sumatran Village (2000). Her second area of research examines the social and historical contexts of female same-sex relations and transgender practices. She co-edited two award-winning anthologies on women's same-sex sexualities and female masculinities, Female Desires: Same-sex Relations and Transgender Practices across Cultures (1999) and Women's Sexualities and Masculinities in a Globalizing Asia (2007). Her research on emerging sexual and gender identities in Indonesia and Southeast Asia was awarded the prestigious Martin Duberman Fellowship by the Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies at the City University of New York and will be published October 2010 under the title Falling into the Lesbi World: Desire and Difference in Indonesia. Her current project turns attention to the construction and negotiation of identity, selfhood and sexuality among baby boomers in the U.S., with a focus on women in the first generation of "out" lesbians in San Francisco.

 

Bonnie Tjeerdsma Blankenship

Professor, Health and Kinesiology

bblanke@purdue.edu

Bonnie Tjeerdsma Blankenship

Bonnie Tjeerdsma Blankenship received her doctoral degree from the University of South Carolina in 1993. After serving on the faculty at Old Dominion University and Georgia State University, Blankenship came to Purdue in 2003 as an Associate Professor in the Department of Health and Kinesiology. Her research interests include assessment of teacher education programs, teacher development, and teacher induction. Her peer-reviewed articles have appeared in the Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, Quest, Teaching and Teacher Education, Physical Educator, and the Journal of Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance. Blankenship recently published a book translating research to practice, The Psychology of Teaching Physical Education. She is currently serving as the undergraduate program director in her department and as Chair-elect for the Special Interest Group on Research on Learning and Instruction in Physical Education in the American Educational Research Association. Blankenship has also served as editor of the Journal of Teaching in Physical Education andchair of the Curriculum and Instruction Academy of the National Association for Sport and Physical Education. As part of her engagement, Blankenship serves as activities director for the Purdue Athletes Life Success program (a free summer day camp for underserved community children), and as director of the Purdue Operation Purple Camp (a free weeklong, residential camp for children of deployed military).

 

Rosalee Clawson

Professor, Political Science

clawsonr@purdue.edu

Rosalee Clawson

Dr. Rosalee Clawson has a Ph.D. in political science from The Ohio State University. Her research and teaching focus on public opinion, mass media, and the politics of race, class, and gender. Her recent book (with Eric N. Waltenburg) is titled, Legacy and Legitimacy: Black Americans and the Supreme Court. She is the co-author (with Zoe M. Oxley) of a textbook on public opinion, Public Opinion: Democratic Ideals, Democratic Practice, and a public opinion workbook, Conducting Empirical Analysis: Public Opinion in Action (forthcoming). She has published numerous articles in political science journals and has received fellowships and grants to support her research and teaching, including ones from the National Science Foundation and the Spencer Foundation. She serves on the editorial board of PS: Political Science & Politics. She is an award-winning teacher, receiving the College of Liberal Arts Award for Educational Excellence and the Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching Award in memory of Charles B. Murphy. She is a member of the Purdue University Teaching Academy, and her name is inscribed in the Book of Great Teachers. She has been recognized with many awards and grants for her work with Pi Sigma Alpha, the political science honor society.

 

Keith Dickson

Professor, Foreign Languages and Literatures

kdickson@purdue.edu

 

Jay Gephart

Professor, Bands

jsgephart@purdue.edu

 

David Kemmerer

Professor, Speech, Language, Hearing Sciences

kemmerer@purdue.edu

David Kemmerer

David Kemmerer has a joint appointment in the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences and the Department of Psychological Sciences.  His teaching responsibilities include courses on the neural bases of speech and language, the field of cognitive neuroscience, and topics in linguistics.  His research focuses on how different kinds of linguistic meaning are mediated by different neural systems, drawing on behavioral and lesion data from brain-damaged patients as well as behavioral and functional neuroimaging data from normal subjects.  His current projects include the linguistic encoding of action and the syntax-semantics interface.  In addition, he is interested in the evolution of language and the neural correlates of consciousness.  His papers have appeared in many high-ranking journals, including Cognitive Neuropsychology, Brain and Language, Neuropsychologia, and Cognition. He is currently working on a textbook about the cognitive neuroscience of language.

 

Inigo Sanchez-Llama

Professor, Foreign Languages and Literatures

sanchezl@purdue.edu

 

Christine Weber-Fox

Professor, Speech, Language, Hearing Sciences

weberfox@purdue.edu

Christine Weber-Fox

Professor Weber-Fox studies how brain functions mediate language processing by addressing four critical questions: 1) Are brain functions distinctive for specific language tasks? 2) How does neural activity elicited by linguistic stimuli mature over the course of development?  3) Do brain functions for language processing differ for individuals with a variety of language experiences and proficiencies? 4) What are the neural indices of language processing in communicatively impaired individuals?

To address these questions, she uses a multileveled approach involving both electrophysiological and behavioral measures. The experimental paradigms are designed to test different aspects of language processing (e.g., meaning integration, grammatical constraints, speech-sound awareness). Experimental outcomes are revealed in measures of event-related brain potentials (ERPs) and behavioral results, including response accuracy and reaction times. Her protocols also involve comprehensive assessments of speech and language abilities. Her studies have shown that neural indices characterize and distinguish various aspects of linguistic processing that develop in childhood and adolescence and reveal differences in underlying processing of in communicatively impaired populations, including children with language impairments and adults and children who stutter. She has also discovered how subtle, as well as clinically ascertained behavioral differences in language proficiency are reflected in neural patterns of activity elicited by language. The converging evidence from her research program (across typical and disordered groups, across different points in development, and across different language tasks) indicates that neural activity for language processing is highly sensitive to developmental factors, experience, proficiency, and the type and complexity of linguistic information that is being processed. As our understanding about brain functions for language continues to evolve, her work will ultimately help establish how our differences as individuals, with our unique experiential and proficiency profiles are mediated by functioning of specific neural systems for language.

 

S. Laurel Weldon

Professor, Political Science

weldons@purdue.edu

 

Dr. S. Laurel Weldon has a Ph.D from the University of Pittsburgh, where she received the Lawrence Cabot Howard Award. Professor Weldon came to the department of Political Science at Purdue in 1999, and has since received substantial scholarly recognition for her work, winning the award for best article published in Political Research Quarterly in 2006 and also winning (twice) the award for best paper on women and politics presented at the national research conference of the American Political Science Association (2005 and 2008). This year she was invited to present her work at a UN Conference called "Women Deepening Democracy" in New Delhi (India).

Together with Mala Htun of the New School, Weldon is engaged in the final stages of an NSF-funded project to conduct a global analysis of the politics of women's rights. In 2002 she received a grant from the Canadian Government to study policies on violence against women. Weldon was appointed Fellow in the Center for Behavioral and Social Sciences in 2007.

Weldon is the author of 14 articles and book chapters and has also published two books, Protest, Policy and the Problem of Violence Against Women (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2002) and When Protest Makes Policy: How Social Movements Represent Disadvantaged Groups (University of Michigan 2010). A third book in progress (co-authored with Mala Htun) presents a global analysis of women's rights. She is also editing (with Georgina Waylen, Karen Celis and Johanna Kantola) the first ever Oxford Handbook on Politics and Gender.

Professor Weldon currently serves on the council of the APSA, as President of the Women and Politics Section of the APSA and on the advisory board for a Palgrave-MacMillan book series on Politics and Gender. She also served on the editorial board of Politics & Gender.

 

Fenggang Yang

Professor, Sociology

fyang@purdue.edu

Fenggang Yang

Dr. Fenggang Yang is Professor of Sociology and Director of the Center on Religion and Chinese Society (CRCS) at Purdue University. He received his BA from Hebei Normal University, MA from Nankai University, and Ph.D. from The Catholic University of America. His research focuses on religious change in China and immigrant religions in the United States. He is the author of Chinese Christians in America: Conversion, Assimilation, and Adhesive Identities, the co-editor of State, Market, and Religions in Chinese Societies and Conversion to Christianity among the Chinese (a special issue of the Sociology of Religion: A Quarterly Review). Two of his articles won "Distinguished Article Awards": "Transformations in New Immigrant Religions and Their Global Implications" and "The Red, Black, and Gray Markets of Religion in China". Dr. Yang is writing a book on the survival and revival of religion in China under Communist rule.  His current research also includes Christian ethics and market transition in China, faith and trust among business people in China, and Chinese Christian churches in the United States. He has given invited lectures at major universities in the United States (Harvard, Yale, Princeton, University of California at Berkeley, University of Chicago, Georgetown University, etc.) and China (Peking University, Tsinghua University, Renmin University, Beijing Normal University, Shaanxi Normal University, Sichuan University, Shanghai University, etc.), invited presentations at major think-tanks, and interviewed by the Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, USA Today, etc. and some newspapers and news magazines in China.

 

Li Zhang

Professor, Patti and Rusty Rueff School of Visual and Performing Arts

lzhang3@purdue.edu

Li Zhang

Li Zhang is a Professor of Art and Design at Purdue University where she also is the Representative of Visual Communications Design. Her specialization is poster design. More than two hundred of Professor Zhang's designs have been recognized in over one hundred exhibitions and publications in twenty-five countries, including Graphis, the International Journal of Visual Communication, Print, How, and the most competitive international design biennials in Poland, Mexico, Russia, and Czech Republic. More than fifty of her posters are in permanent collections of the Library of Congress in the USA, Zürich Museum of Design in Switzerland, Victoria & Albert Museum and Imperial War Museum in the United Kingdom, Ogaki Poster Museum in Japan, and Lahti Poster Museum in Finland. Professor Zhang is a co-author of the book Social Poster Design: Visual Connections Between East and West. Professor Zhang has also received many national and international design awards, including First Prize of Domtar Creative Awards, Gold Medal of Creativity, Silver Award of In-Print, Second Prize of Computer Space, American Graphic Design Award, Design One Award, and the Top One Selection in the USA in the 16th Annual World's Most Memorable Poster Competition.

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