Spring 2008

Promoted from Assistant Professor to Associate Professor

Dwight S. Atkinson

English

datkinso@purdue.edu

Dwight S. Atkinson

Dwight Atkinson has been in the Department of English since 2006. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Southern California in 1993 and then taught at Auburn, the University of Alabama, and Temple University Japan before joining the faculty at Purdue.

Professor Atkinson's research is in second language acquisition. He received an award for the best article published in Journal of Second Language Writing in 1999 (with Vai Ramanathan). He is the author of two books, sixteen articles, and eight book chapters. One of his current projects is a book entitled Culture Theory for TESOL and Applied Linguistics: Modern, Postmodern, and Beyond.

 

Tithi Bhattacharya

History

tbhattac@purdue.edu

Tithi Bhattacharya

Tithi Bhattacharya received her Ph.D. from the School of Oriental and African Studies (University of London) in 2000. Her dissertation on the English-educated middle class of nineteenth-century Calcutta became the basis of her first book, The Sentinels of Culture: Class, Education, and the Colonial Intellectual in Bengal (Oxford, 2005). The Bengali colonial elite, and the chief protagonist of her study, were self-defined as the bhadralok, literally meaning gentleman. The bhadralok were enormously influential in guiding the literary and cultural production of the nineteenth century as well as the later nationalist movement against British colonialism. Analysis of their social basis has been one of the greatest historiographic challenges in the study of South Asia. Bhattacharya's work focused on a very specific aspect of the middle class's social history: their obsessive preoccupation with culture and education. The book starts from a rooted definition of education and demonstrates how education and culture were frequently aligned to social and economic power. Bhattacharya uses class as an analytic category to argue that the commentaries about education and being educated in colonial Bengal ought to be seen as key arguments in staking out the territory of a new emergent middle class.

Professor Bhattacharya's work has been published in leading journals such as the Journal of Asian Studies, South Asia Research and New Left Review. Her next book project is titled "Uncanny Histories: Fear, Superstition and Reason in Colonial Bengal". It is an attempt to write a material history of fear and to show how new historical processes—rural to urban migration, English education, new funerary practices—changed the very cultural inflections of fear as a colonial society negotiated its encounter with modernity.

Professor Bhattacharya teaches courses in South Asian history, Colonialism, Critical Theory, and Histories of the dead and the undead.

 

Mia S. Bynum

Psychological Sciences

msbynum@purdue.edu

Mia S. Bynum

Dr. Mia Smith Bynum is an associate professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences at Purdue University. She is an expert in family processes and mental health in ethnic minority families, racial identity, parenting, and adolescent psychopathology. Her current research focuses on general and cultural aspects of parenting in African American families and how they predict mental health outcomes and sexual behavior in African American adolescents. She is investigating how African American parents communicate with their adolescent children about racial discrimination and how these efforts affect mental health outcomes in African American adolescents. She also is studying the longitudinal effects of racism exposure on the psychological functioning of African American adolescents.

Dr. Bynum came to Purdue after completing a postdoctoral fellowship in the Center for Family Research at the University of Georgia in 2001. She completed her doctoral training in clinical psychology at the University of Virginia and a bachelor's degree with honors in psychology at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in 1993. She is a licensed psychologist in Indiana and Georgia.

 

Hyunyi Cho

Communication

hcho@purdue.edu

Hyunyi Cho

Hyunyi Cho (Ph.D., Michigan State University) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication at Purdue University. She holds a courtesy appointment in the Department of Youth Development of Agricultural Education, and is an affiliated member of the Oncological Sciences Center and the Regenstrief Center for Health Care Engineering of Purdue. Her current research interests center on the evaluation of health communication message effects on diverse audiences, the examination of media effects on health/risk relevant beliefs and behaviors, and the development and evaluation of health communication interventions. Currently, she is the principal investigator of a project examining sun protection message effects on adolescents, funded by the National Cancer Institute. She is also part of a multi-institutional project examining food safety practices, funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Her research has been recognized by the Dissertation of the Year Award given jointly by the Health Communication Divisions of the National Communication Association and the International Communication Association, and Elizabeth H. Nelson Prize for the best conference paper from a society in transition of the World Association for Public Opinion Research. She has been invited to health communication expert panels organized by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention and the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. She teaches courses on persuasion, media effects, risk communication, and health communication campaigns at the graduate level, and strategic communications at the undergraduate level. With her undergraduate students, she has been involved in service learning projects serving the strategic communication needs of diverse local non-profit organizations including West Lafayette Recycling Department, Tippecanoe County Public Health Department, and Park and Recreational Departments of Lafayette, West Lafayette, and Tippecanoe County. These projects have been funded by the Office of the Vice Provost of Engagement.

 

Elena Coda

Foreign Languages and Literature

ecoda@purdue.edu

Elena Coda

Elena Coda received her PhD in Italian Literature from UCLA. Her research and teaching interests include  nineteenth- and twentieth-century Italian literature and comparative literature: hermetic poetry, modernism, futurism and the historical Avant-garde,  the representation of the modern and postmodern city in literature,  essayistic narrative. She co-edited a bilingual edition of contemporary Italian poetry: The Promised Land: Italian Poetry from 1975 to the present, published in Los Angeles by Sun and Moon Press (1998), and published articles on Futurism, Tarchetti, Svevo, Slataper and Michelstaedter. She is particularly interested in the construction of borders and national identity within the modernist milieu of Trieste. On this topic she has also published a book, Scipio Slataper (Palumbo 2007, 320 pp.)   

 

Alexander L Francis

Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences

francisa@purdue.edu

Alexander L Francis

Alex Francis earned a dual PhD in Linguistics and Cognitive Psychology from the University of Chicago in 1999 and completed a 3-year postdoctoral fellowship in Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of Hong Kong before coming to Purdue in 2002. His research investigates the role of attention in speech perception. Recent studies have focused on how linguistic experience and perceptual training affect the way listeners pay attention to different acoustic properties of speech sounds. A new line of research explores the effects of limited processing capacity on speech perception as a way of better understanding why both cognitive aging and hearing impairment make it especially difficult to understand speech in the presence of competing speech (the "cocktail party problem"). He has also studied the production, perception and learning of Cantonese lexical tones and factors contributing to the intelligibility of synthetic speech.

Francis' research has been funded by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong and the National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (NIH-NIDCD), and has been published in journals including Brain and Language, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, Journal of Phonetics, Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research, and Perception and Psychophysics, among others. He is a former associate editor for speech perception at the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America.

In addition to his role as an associate professor of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, Francis is also a full member of the faculty in the Linguistics Program and holds a courtesy appointment in Cognitive Psychology. He regularly teaches courses in speech science, acoustics, and experimental phonetics, and is developing courses in attention and speech perception.

 

William G. Gray

History

wggray@purdue.edu

William G. Gray

William Gray has been studying Germany in some fashion or other for twenty years. In 1992 he graduated summa cum laude from Princeton with an A.B. in German Civilization and Politics. After a fellowship year at the Free University of Berlin, he went on to study European history at Yale under the guidance of Paul Kennedy, Henry Turner, and John Lewis Gaddis. His Ph. D., earned in December 1999, was followed by a post-doctoral fellowship at New York University.

The guiding thread of Gray's scholarly research is the relationship between Germany's foreign policy ambitions and the broader history of international relations. "I'm not a political scientist," he explains, "but I'm fascinated by the complex dynamics of international systems." His first book, Germany's Cold War, showed how the bitter rivalry between East and West Germany created problems—and opportunities—for states around the world in the 1950s and 1960s. Recent articles in Diplomatic History and Central European History have argued that West Germany's robust economic performance served, ironically, to destabilize the international monetary system. Gray's second book project draws together this and other themes—such as European integration and nuclear non-proliferation—into a narrative account of West Germany's search for a "grand strategy" in the 1960s and 1970s, a time when economic power appeared to eclipse raw military might as the key to influence in world affairs.

Gray came to Purdue in the fall of 2004 after four years at Texas Tech University. Aside from teaching courses in West Lafayette on 20th-Century Europe, Gray is keenly interested in study abroad programs. For the past four years he has helped to edit H-German, a nationwide discussion list on German history, and he is one of five editors to present The Encyclopedia of the Cold War in May 2008.

 

George Hollich

Psychological Sciences

ghollich@purdue.edu

George Hollich

Professor Hollich is one of the world's leading researchers in the area of language development. More specifically, he studies how children, 7 to 24 months of age, come to connect what they see with what they hear: this includes hearing individual words in the fluent stream of speech, as well as deciding what new words mean. For each of these tasks, he finds that children's early success depends on multiple factors including perceptual salience, nascent grammatical knowledge, and infants' skill at detection of simultaneous audio and visual change (AKA. audiovisual synchrony).

In recognition for his work in the areas of early language development and speech perception, Dr. Hollich was the recipient of the 2007 Boyd McCandless Award given by Division 7 of APA to recognize "a young scientist who has made a distinguished contribution to the dissemination of developmental science." George was also presented the 2006 International Society on Infant Studies Distinguished Early Career Contribution Award. This award was given in recognition of "significant new insights into early perception, cognition, and language acquisition." Also cited was the breadth of his work and the use of innovative technologies from multiple areas, including developmental and cognitive psychology, computer science and speech science.

 

Maren Linett

English

mlinett@purdue.edu

Maren Linett

Maren Linett specializes in modern British fiction with secondary specializations in Anglo-American modernism and Anglo-Irish literature. She has published articles on Dorothy Richardson, Virginia Woolf, Jean Rhys, and James Joyce. Her first book, Modernism, Feminism, and Jewishness, was published in Fall 2007 by Cambridge University Press, and she has begun work on two edited volumes: a Cambridge Companion to Modernist Women Writers (Cambridge UP) and Virginia Woolf: An MFS Reader (Johns Hopkins UP). In 2005 she guest-edited a special issue of Modern Fiction Studies entitled Modernism's Jews / Jewish Modernisms. Linett teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on modern British literature, modernist women writers, Jews and gender in modern fiction, Virginia Woolf, and James Joyce.

 

Melanie Morgan

Communication

morgan3@purdue.edu

Melanie Morgan

Melanie Morgan is an assistant professor of communication. She also serves as the director of Purdue's basic presentational speaking course, COM 114. Morgan's primary research interest is in cognitive factors underlying communication skill development and message production. Her research has focused on the production of complex messages in a variety of areas, including aging, family, legal and scientific contexts. Recent journal publications have appeared in the Journal of Communication, Communication Studies, and the Southern Journal of Communication. Morgan is the author of Presentational Speaking: Theory and Practice, 5th ed., published by McGraw-Hill. She teaches courses in communication skills as well as consulting and training and development. Morgan holds a Ph.D. in Communication Studies from the University of Kansas.

 

Bich M. Nguyen

English

nguyenb@purdue.edu

Bich M. Nguyen

Bich Minh Nguyen is the author of the memoir Stealing Buddha's Dinner (Viking Penguin, 2007), which received the PEN/Jerard Award. She has also coedited three anthologies: 30/30: Thirty American Stories from the Last Thirty Years (Penguin Academic); Contemporary Creative Nonfiction: I & Eye (Pearson Longman); and The Contemporary American Short Story (Pearson Longman). Her work has appeared on the PBS NewsHour with Jim Lehrer and in anthologies including Dream Me Home Safely: Writers on Growing up in America, The Presence of Others and Watermark: Vietnamese American Poetry and Prose. Her first novel, Short Girls, will be published by Viking Penguin in 2009. Nguyen teaches creative nonfiction writing, fiction writing, and Asian American Literature in the English Department at Purdue. She is also an active member of the College of Liberal Arts' Council on Asian American Studies.

 

Kevin Vaughn

Sociology and Anthropology

kjvaughn@purdue.edu

Kevin Vaughn

Kevin J. Vaughn, associate professor of anthropology at Purdue University, received his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of California at Santa Barbara. He has conducted archaeological fieldwork in Peru, Ecuador, the American Southwest, California, the Great Plains, and in Germany. Vaughn is an expert in archaeology, the prehispanic civilizations of South America (including the Inca and Nasca), and the application of techniques from the physical sciences to address archaeological problems (a field known as archaeometry). His recent work funded by the National Science Foundation and the H. John Heinz III Fund Grant Program for Latin American Archaeology focuses on Nasca, a pre-Inca civilization that flourished on Peru's desert south coast during the first millennium A.D.. In this project he analyzes Nasca pottery, excavates ancient houses, and seeks evidence for ancient mines and mining related activities. Vaughn has just completed a book entitled The Ancient Andean Village: Marcaya in Prehispanic Nasca to be published by the University of Arizona Press. He has authored publications in international archaeological and scientific journals including Journal of Archaeological Science, Latin American Antiquity, Journal of Archaeological Research, Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, Journal of Field Archaeology, Antiquity, Andean Past, The SAA Archaeological Record and international materials science journals JOM (the Journal of the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society) and Hyperfine Interactions. He was co-editor of a volume of The Archaeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association, and has recently submitted an edited volume to the School for Advanced Research (formerly School of American Research) Press entitled The Emergence of Leadership: Transitions in Decision Making from Small-Scale to Middle-Range Societies. He has organized symposia and presented at national and international conferences in the United States, Canada, Italy, and Peru. At Purdue University Vaughn teaches archaeology at the introductory, advanced undergraduate, and graduate level.

 


Promoted to Clinical Associate Professor from Clinical Assistant Professor

Hope Gulker

Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences

 

Hope Gulker, M.A., M.S.W., is a Clinical Associate Professor at the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences at Purdue University. She teaches a graduate course entitled: "Counseling in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology". She has taught children in Early Childhood and Early Childhood Special Education programs for over thirty years, and has collaborated with Speech-Language Pathologists at the Birth to Three and Preschool Language Programs at Purdue for the past twenty two years. She has worked in First Steps, Head Start and in program development through the ARC, and has special interests in inclusion, music, early literacy and exploring affective issues related to early childhood, children with special needs and family systems.

 


Promoted from Associate Professor to Professor

Janet Afary

History

afary@purdue.edu

Janet Afary

Dr. Janet Afary has a Ph.D. in Modern Middle East History from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where she received the Horace H. Rackham Distinguished Dissertation Award.  Her dissertation also received the annual award for Best Dissertation of the Year from the Foundation for Iranian Studies. She is a Professor of History and Women's Studies (Joint Appointment), and an affiliate Professor of Political Science, at Purdue University.  In 2006 Dr. Afary was appointed University Faculty Scholar.  This five year appointment is made by Purdue's President.  Dr. Afary is author of the forthcoming book, Sexual Politics in Modern Iran (Cambridge University Press, 2008). Her previous publications include: The Iranian Constitutional Revolution: Grassroots Democracy, Social Democracy, and the Origins of Feminism (N. Y.: Columbia UP, 1996), which was also translated and published in Iran (Bisotoun, 2000); and (with Kevin B. Anderson) Foucault and the Iranian Revolution: Gender and the Seductions of Islamism (University of Chicago Press, 2005).  This book received the Latifeh Yarshater Award for Best Book in Iranian Women's Studies and was a first runner-up for the book award from the Association for Humanist Sociology.   Dr. Afary has also received year-long fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the American Council for Learned Societies (ACLS).  She has served as president of the International Society for Iranian Studies (ISIS-MESA, 2004-2006); the Association for Middle East Women's Studies (AMEWS-MESA, 2004-2005), and the Coordinating Council for Women in History of the American Historical Association (CCWH-AHA, 2001-2003).

 

Wei Hong

Foreign Languages and Literature

hongwei@purdue.edu

Wei Hong

Professor Wei Hong is an Associate Professor/Director of the Chinese Language Program in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures at Purdue. She is also the Director of the Confucius Institute at Purdue University.

Professor Hong received her MA in German in 1986 from Tongji University, Shanghai, China and Ph.D in Contrastive Linguistics from Purdue University in 1993. She joined the Purdue faculty in 1994 as an Assistant Professor in Chinese. She has published two books with the titles of "Practical Business Chinese" by China Books and Periodicals in San Francisco in 1997 and "Chinese and German Requests: A Cross-Cultural Study" by LINCOM EUROPA in Germany in 1998. Her articles include studies on requests in German and Chinese, cross-cultural pragmatics, teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language, multimedia-assisted learning of Chinese and Business Chinese.

 

Jacqueline Mariña

Philosophy

marinaj@purdue.edu

Jacqueline Mariña

Professor Mariña works primarily in the area of late 18th and early 19th century philosophy, specializing in the philosophies of Immanuel Kant and Friedrich Schleiermacher. She is the author of Transformation of the Self in the Thought of Friedrich Schleiermacher (Oxford: 2008) and the editor of The Cambridge Companion to Friedrich Schleiermacher (Cambridge: 2005). She is the author of numerous journal articles and book chapters. Her articles have appeared in journals such as Kant-Studien, Journal of the History of Philosophy, Catholic Philosophical Quarterly, The Southern Journal of Philosophy, Journal of Religion, Faith and Philosophy, and Religious Studies.

 

JoAnn Miller

Sociology and Anthropology

jlmiller@purdue.edu

JoAnn Miller

JoAnn Miller came to Purdue in 1984, from her graduate studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She is an affiliated faculty member in Women's Studies.  She has worked as a Visiting Scholar at the University of Indonesia and a Visiting Associate Professor at the University of Hamburg (Germany).  In Purdue's Department of Sociology and Anthropology, JoAnn was the Director of Graduate Studies for four years.  She has also been the Director of Undergraduate Studies.  Currently she is a candidate for President-Elect, the Society for the Study of Social Problems.  Her work focuses on law and social problems, especially family abuse and violence, and problem solving courts for persons returning to their homes from state prison.  She sponsors undergraduate students every semester in service learning opportunities in the Greater Lafayette Community and she works on a volunteer basis with the City of Lafayette on programs designed to prevent crime and build strong neighborhoods. Her most recent book is Family Abuse and Violence: A Social Problems Perspective.  Her peer-reviewed journal articles appear in Violence Against Women, Law and Society Review, and the Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology.  Currently, she and a Superior Court Judge (Donald C. Johnson) have a book under contract with Rowman & Littlefield.

 

Melissa J. Remis

Sociology and Anthropology

remism@purdue.edu

Melissa J. Remis

Melissa Remis is a biological anthropologist (BA University of California Santa Cruz, 1986; PHD Yale University 1994), and is a professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Purdue University where she teaches classes and mentors students in biological anthropology, primate behavioral ecology and conservation. Professor Remis' research program involves two related issues of significant anthropological interest: one on feeding ecology, locomotion and nutrition of western gorillas; and the other on collaborative multidisciplinary research on the human-animal dynamic, including the impacts of human disturbances in the Congo basin. Since 1988, she has maintained a field research program at the Dzanga-Sangha Forest Reserve, Central African Republic. Remis' behavioral ecology research on gorillas led her to also develop an innovative experimental research program that uses U.S. zoo-housed apes to explore the physiological foundations of ape feeding adaptations and evolutionary divergence. Threats to the sustainability of gorilla populations led Remis to examine their relationships to changing human and wildlife communities and conservation issues in the Central African region. In 1997, she began primate and other wildlife population surveys and productive collaborative research that integrate natural and social science approaches to anthropological fieldwork in Central Africa in order to address dynamic human and wildlife interdependence in complex conservation dilemmas. This work has provided opportunities for research collaborations and field training for U.S. and Central African graduate students, scholars and conservation practitioners. Remis and collaborators are currently addressing challenges to wildlife conservation in the Congo Basin by forwarding a transvalued species concept intended to capture the relationships between the ecological, economic, and symbolic roles of gorillas and other animals in human lives.  The larger project further provides the framework for a book-length manuscript (in progress) that takes a case-study approach to examining 20 years of anthropological and wildlife research and conservation at Dzanga-Sangha.

 

F. Robert Sabol

Patti and Rusty Rueff Department of Visual and Performing Arts

bobsabol@purdue.edu

F. Robert Sabol

F. Robert Sabol is a Professor of Art and Design at Purdue University where he also is the Program Chair of Art Education and former Interim Chair of the Division of Art and Design. His research interests include assessment, multiculturalism, gifted and talented education, curriculum development, and professional development of art educators. He has given over 120 presentations of his research at state, national, and international conventions. He has received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the U. S. Department of Education, the National Art Education Foundation, and various other organizations to support his research. He has published numerous book chapters and articles in professional journals and is a co-author of Assessing Expressive Learning and Co-Editor of Through the Prism: Looking into the Spectrum of Writings by Enid Zimmerman. He served as the Vice Chair of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standard’s Early Childhood through Middle Childhood Standards Committee and as a consultant with several state departments of education teacher standards development committees.He has served on the editorial boards of Studies in Art Education and Art Education. He has received numerous awards for his research and teachingincluding the National Art Education Association's (NAEA) Manual Barkan Memorial Award for Outstanding Research in Art Education, NAEA Western Region Higher Education Division Art Educator of the Year Award, Art Education Association of Indiana (AEAI) Art Educator of the Year, AEAI Elementary Art Educator of the Year, AEAI Education Higher Education Division Art Educator of the Year, AEAI Distinguished Fellow, and twice received the Purdue University Excellence in Teaching Award. He has been President of the NAEA Public Policy and Arts Administration issues group and President of AEAI. Currently, he is the NAEA Western Region Vice President and a member of the Executive Committee of the NAEA Board of Directors.

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