Spring 2011

Promoted to Professor

Janet M. Alsup

Professor, English

jalsup@purdue.edu

Janet M. Alsup

Janet Alsup received her Ph.D. in English education from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 2000 and joined the faculty at Purdue in the same year. She holds a joint appointment in the College of Liberal Arts and the College of Education. Her specialties are teacher education and professional identity development, young adult literature, adolescent literary response, the teaching of composition in secondary schools, and qualitative and narrative inquiry.

Professor Alsup has published three books, including the monograph Teacher Identity Discourses: Negotiating Personal and Professional Spaces (LEA/NCTE, 2006) which won the 2007 Mina P. Shaughnessy Prize from the Modern Language Association. More recently, she has edited a collection of essays about young adult literature and its connections to adolescent identity formation, entitled Young Adult Literature and Adolescent Identity Across Cultures and Classrooms: Contexts for the Literary Lives of Teens (Routledge, 2010). She has also published numerous articles in many respected disciplinary journals, including English Education, The Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, and The ALAN Review. Her current research explores how the field of cognitive science informs adolescent literary response, reading comprehension, and secondary school literature pedagogy.

Professor Alsup is past chair of the Conference on English Education (CEE), the national organization for English teacher educators. She is member of Purdue’s Teaching Academy and won the Charles B. Murphy Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching in 2005.

 

Charles A. Gick

Professor, Visual and Performing Arts

 

Mary B. Leader

Professor, English

mleader@purdue.edu

Mary B. Leader

Marion T. Trout

Professor, Visual and Performing Arts

mttrout@purdue.edu

Marion T. Trout

Dr. Marion T. “Mo” Trout is an active clinician, adjudicator, trumpet soloist, and guest conductor for jazz bands, concert bands and orchestras throughout the United States. He has conducted numerous All-District, Region and Area jazz bands as well as All-State Jazz Bands in Oklahoma and Indiana. In his fourteenth year as director of the jazz program at Purdue University, Dr. Trout directs the Purdue Jazz Band, the American Music Repertory Ensemble, the Jazz Lab Band, and the Concert Jazz Band. He also teaches a Jazz Theory Workshop and Jazz History. Under his direction the Purdue Jazz Band has collaborated with numerous jazz artists including Bill Watrous, Bob Mintzer, the New York Voices, Tom Harrell, Allen Vizzutti, Eddie Daniels and Eric Marienthal to name only a few. Dr. Trout’s Purdue bands have toured throughout the US and Europe and performed at such prestigious venues as the University of North Texas Jazz Festival, the Notre Dame Jazz Festival the Elmhurst Collegiate Jazz Festival garnering numerous band and soloist awards. In two European tours the band has performed at the Montreux, Alpine and North Sea International Jazz Festivals and hosted a study abroad tour to Italy in 2008 and will host another to Eastern Europe in May 2011. Dr. Trout received his Bachelor of Music Education from Texas Christian University and both his Master of Music Education degree and Doctor of Musical Arts degree (Trumpet Performance) from the University of North Texas.

 


Promoted to Associate Professor

Daniel P. Aldrich

Associate Professor, Political Science

daldrich@purdue.edu

Daniel P. Aldrich

Daniel received his Ph.D. in Government from Harvard University in 2005 and came to Purdue in 2008 after initially teaching at Tulane University. His research has focused on the ways in which state agencies interact with contentious civil society over the siting of controversial facilities such as nuclear power plants, airports, and dams. Daniel's current research investigates how neighborhoods and communities recover from disasters. He has published two books (Site Fights with Cornell University Press and Building Resilience (forthcoming) with the University of Chicago Press) along with 16 peer-reviewed articles, multiple book chapters, articles, book reviews, and op-eds for general audiences in four main areas: disaster recovery, controversial facility siting, fieldwork practices, and sex differences in political behavior. He has been a Visiting Scholar at the University of Tokyo’s Law Faculty in Japan, an Advanced Research Fellow at Harvard University’s Program on US-Japan Relations, a Visiting Researcher at Centre Américain, Sciences Po in Paris, France and a Visiting Professor at the Tata Institute for Disaster Management in Mumbai, India. He is a senior associate editor of the journal Asian Politics and Policy and a Mansfield CGP Fellow. His research has been funded by grants from the Abe Foundation, IIE Fulbright Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Reischauer Institute at Harvard University, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and Harvard’s Center for European Studies

 

Jennifer L. Bay

Associate Professor, English

jbay@purdue.edu

Jennifer L. Bay

Jennifer L. Bay has been in the Department of English and in the Professional Writing Program since 2002. Before coming to Purdue, she taught for two years as an Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Cal State-Los Angeles. Jenny's work spans two areas: new media theory and the scholarship of engagement. In her work with new media, she attempts to tease out the complexities involved with the rhetorical forms emerging alongside new media, as well as how we are to ontologically approach new media objects. Because professional writing and public discourse often incorporate new media, her theoretical work with new media has extended into more experiential areas such as internships and community engagement. Her work has appeared in journals such as College English, JAC, and The Writing Instructor, as well as edited collections. She regularly teaches undergraduate courses in Professional Writing Research Methods and Professional Writing Internships, as well as graduate courses in Gender and Rhetoric, New Media, and Postmodern Theory.

 

Cornelius L. Bynum

Associate Professor, History

bynum@purdue.edu

Cornelius L. Bynum

Cornelius L. Bynum received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2004. He teaches courses in African American history and writes about progressive impulses among African Americans and authentic and independent strains of black radicalism in the early twentieth century. His first book, A. Philip Randolph and the Struggle for Civil Rights, is an analytical intellectual history that explores central aspects of Randolph's thought and activism. In it he argues that Randolph's life and career shaped and were shaped by many of the monumental events, ideas, and developments of the twentieth century and demonstrates that Randolph's firm determination to improve the lives of black workers fundamentally affected core strategies and tactics of the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.

His second book examines the small, but significant cohort of West Indian radicals in Harlem that migrated into the American Communist Party in the 1920s. Led by Cyril Briggs and Richard B. Moore, this group known as the African Blood Brotherhood raised searing questions about the economic structure of black oppression in the United States, the Caribbean, and the world and illustrates the unique ways in which Harlem radicals drew on both nationalist and Marxist themes in the postwar years to fashion a distinct critique of industrial capitalism that constituted an authentic and largely independent program of social reform.

 

Darren T. Dochuk

Associate Professor, History

ddochuk@purdue.edu

Darren T. Dochuk

Darren Dochuk received his Ph.D. in 2005 from the University of Notre Dame. His first book, From Bible Belt to Sunbelt: Plain-folk Religion, Grassroots Politics, and the Rise of Evangelical Conservatism (Norton, 2011), tracks the emergence of evangelical politics from out of the margins of the Depression-era “Bible Belt” South into the mainstream of California’s “Sunbelt” society. Using popular theology and local religious institutions as its principal sources, this study explains how southern evangelicals, roughly two million of whom migrated to Southern California for work in the Cold War defense industry, helped galvanize Ronald Reagan’s conservative coalition. This coalition first transformed California politics in the 1960s before achieving national power in 1980. Professor Dochuk has also co-edited a collection of essays called Sunbelt Rising: The Politics of Space, Place, and Region (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011), which assembles the latest work by leading scholars of politics in the South and West. Professor Dochuk’s second book is tentatively titled Anointed With Oil: God and Black Gold in Modern America. It employs grassroots sources, church and corporate archives, and the personal records of powerful industrialists to chart evangelical Protestantism’s longstanding (and politically significant) relationship with the petroleum industry.

Professor Dochuk’s work has been published in a number of leading journals and edited collections, including International Labor and Working-Class History, Religion and American Culture, Religion and American Politics, and The Political Culture of the New West. His scholarship has garnered a number of awards, including the Society of American Historians’ 2006 Allan Nevins Prize for the best-written Ph.D. dissertation on a major theme in American history.

Professor Dochuk teaches courses on religion and politics, the 1970s, the 1960s, and post-1945 U.S. history.

 

Stacy E. Holden

Associate Professor, History

sholden@purdue.edu

 

Stacy E. Holden completed her Ph.D in History at Boston University in 2005. Her professional activities have provided her with opportunities to study Arabic in Tunisia, work for the US Embassy in Mauritania, examine historic preservation projects in Egypt, and research colonial architecture in Mali. Since arriving at Purdue University, she also assembled and directed a team of undergraduate and graduate students, who collected social and economic data for a computer simulation of life in Baghdad, Iraq. Professor Holden is particularly interested in architecture and urbanism as well as the interconnections between politics and the environment in the Arab-Islamic Middle East and North Africa. She has recently published The Politics of Food in Modern Morocco (University Press of Florida, 2009), which uses urban foodways as a means of evaluating how workers in Fez influenced the governmental institutions of this North African monarchy. Presently, she is editing a collection of primary sources that traces Iraqi history between 1903 and 2005 (University Press of Florida, forthcoming). Her articles have appeared in a variety of journals, including The Journal of North African Studies, APT Bulletin: The Journal of Preservation Technology, History in Africa: A Journal of Method, The Arab Studies Journal, and Journal of the Historical Society. Working with both French and Arabic sources, Professor Holden’s current research addresses how and why the French preserved medinas, the walled quarters of old cities, in colonial Morocco in order to forefront the engagement of ordinary Moroccans with the colonial regime.

 

Torsten O. Reimer

Associate Professor, Communication

treimer@purdue.edu

Torsten O. Reimer

Torsten Reimer received his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from the Free University of Berlin and a Habilitation degree in Cognitive Psychology from the University of Basel in Switzerland. Before moving to the U.S., Dr. Reimer worked at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin, an interdisciplinary center of excellence devoted to the study of human cognition. His research explores the role of communication in decision making. His work employs a variety of quantitative methods including experiments, behavioral observations and surveys, as well as computer simulations and computational modeling. Dr. Reimer’s research program has the overarching goal to explore how communication principles facilitate decision making by guiding information processing and reducing information overload. Applied topics include the design of persuasive messages and risk communication. His work has been published in outlets such as Human Communication Research, Communication Monographs, Communication Yearbook, Cognitive Science, and the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition. Dr. Reimer regularly reviews manuscripts for journals in Communication and Psychology and serves on the editorial board of Communication Studies and Communication Quarterly. In 2010, he chaired the Golden Anniversary Monograph Award Committee for the National Communication Association and was elected to vice chair of the group communication division of the same organization. Dr. Reimer coordinates the Group Communication Course in the Department of Communication and teaches courses on Judgment and Decision Making, Social Influence, and Research Methods.

 

Michael A. Ryan

Associate Professor, History

ryan6@purdue.edu

Michael A. Ryan

Michael A. Ryan received his PhD from the University Minnesota, Twin Cities in 2005. A specialist in the intellectual, cultural, and social history of late medieval Iberia and the Mediterranean Basin, his research encompasses a variety of fields, including medieval conceptions of magic and divination, the connection between occult ideas and apocalyptic expectations, medieval travelers and their wider world, and the mechanisms that drove medieval pilgrimage, encounter, and exchange.

With Karolyn Kinane, he is the co-editor of End of Days: Essays on the Apocalypse from Antiquity to Modernity (McFarland, 2009). Taking an interdisciplinary approach to his work, Professor Ryan’s written work has been published in various journals including Essays in Medieval Studies; Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft; and Speculum, as well as in collections of essays published by Brill and the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies at the University of Toronto. His book, A Kingdom of Stargazers: Astrology and Authority in the Late Medieval Crown of Aragon (Cornell University Press, 2011), analyzes the slippery concepts of magic and astrology in the medieval worldview, how some individuals contextualized them during a time of profound crisis, and how these disciplines intersected with notions surrounding monarchical authority in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Barcelona. He is currently working on a new monograph-lengthy study on fraud, charlatanism, and magical trickery in the late medieval Mediterranean. Using Barcelona, Montpellier, Genoa, Venice, and Palermo as case studies, Professor Ryan studies secular and ecclesiastical authorities’ responses to charlatans and their activities in the public and private spheres to determine the parameters of a particularly Latin Christian and Mediterranean understanding of magical fraud and deceit.

Professor Ryan offers seminars on the medieval and early modern Mediterranean, gender and sexuality, the Crusades, late medieval crisis and apocalypticism, and the cultural history of the Middle Ages.

 

James M. Tyler

Associate Professor, Communication

tyler@purdue.edu

James M. Tyler

Dr. James Tyler has a Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, where his dissertation received the American Psychological Association Dissertation Research award. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication and an Affiliate Faculty in the Department of Psychological Sciences at Purdue University.

From the broadest perspective, his research interests lie in communication and social psychology, centering on the interpersonal aspects of the self as embedded in social relationships. Specifically, he focuses on how the behavioral, motivational, and emotional components of the self influence interpersonal functioning. To this end, he has conducted over 40 research studies widely examining the psychological processes involved in the self-regulation and self-presentation of people’s interpersonal behavior. Underscoring all is the central tenet that people’s behaviors and emotions are influenced by their concerns about others’ impression and social acceptance of them. Although his research can be broadly described as relating to the self and interpersonal behavior, the areas he has specifically focused on can be incorporated under two generalized categories. The first category concerns the processes, motivations, and strategies involved in people’s self-presentation efforts. The second category involves self-regulation, sectioned into (a) conserving and replenishing self-regulation resources, and (b) interpersonal functioning and availability of the self’s regulatory resources.

Dr. Tyler has published over 20 articles and book chapters in premier journals in Communication and Social Psychology including: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Human Communication Research, Management Communication Quarterly, and Social Cognition. He is a reviewer for over 20 journals and serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. Together with Jennifer Neville (Computer Science) and Stacey Connaughton (Communication) Tyler was awarded an NSF grant ($410,000) titled, “Machine learning techniques to model the impact of interdependent relational communication patterns on the effectiveness of geographically distributed teams.”

 

Germina N. Veldwachter

Associate Professor, Foreign Languages & Literatures

nveldwac@purdue.edu

 

Nadège Veldwachter received her Ph. D. from the University of California, Los Angles, in 2005. Her primary fields of research are Francophone literatures, translation and globalization studies. Her work is concerned with issues of readership formation, literary consumption and the marketing of ideology. Her forthcoming book, La littérature francophone antillaise face à sa mondialisation: Lost in Translation [Francophone Caribbean Literature and Globalization: Lost in translation], examines both the literary and social aspects of the book, as an object, by analyzing the conditions under which Francophone Caribbean writers are published, translated and read in Africa, Europe and the United States.

Dr. Veldwachter’s second project, for which she received a Library Scholars Grant, focuses on the politics of writing and archiving trauma by drawing parallels between the histories of victims of the Holocaust, the Rwandan genocide, and French colonial rule.

Since joining the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures in 2005, Dr. Veldwachter has taught undergraduate courses and seminars that introduce students to the diversity of Francophone literatures and cultures. France is studied in the context of its colonial past and contemporary legacies. This learning structure entails highlighting regional cultures and practices; studying perspectives on immigration politics; and integrating post-colonial theory.

Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (765) 494-4600

© 2017 Purdue University | An equal access/equal opportunity university | Copyright Complaints | Maintained by CLA

If you have trouble accessing this page because of a disability, please contact the College of Liberal Arts Webmaster.

Some content on this site may require the use of a special plug-in or application. Please visit our plug-ins page for links to download these applications.