Spring 2009

Promoted from Associate Professor to Professor

Christopher Agnew

Psychological Sciences

agnew@purdue.edu

Christopher Agnew

Christopher R. Agnew received his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in December of 1994 and joined the faculty at Purdue in 1995. His research focuses primary on close, interpersonal relationships, with particular emphasis on commitment, social influence, and dissolution processes. He has published widely, authoring more than 50 articles and chapters. His research has received funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Dr. Agnew serves on the editorial boards for the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology and Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, and he serves as Associate Editor for Personal Relationships. He has served as grant reviewer for NIH, the National Science Foundation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He has also served as an Executive Officer and on the Board of Directors for the International Association for Relationship Research (IARR). He was the recipient of the Early Career Award from the Relationships Researchers Interest Group of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) in 2003 and was elected Fellow of the Association for Psychological Sciences (APS) in 2006. His memberships in professional societies include the American Psychological Association, APS, IARR, SPSP, the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, and the Society for Experimental Social Psychology.

 

Andrew Buckser

Anthropology

buckser@purdue.edu

Andrew Buckser

Andrew Buckser is a cultural anthropologist who studies the effects of social change on religious systems and on understandings of illness. He has conducted much of his research in Denmark, where he has done fieldwork with a variety of religious groups. His first study, in the early 1990s, explored the development of several Protestant sects in rural Jutland. Subsequently he worked with members of the Jewish community in Copenhagen, investigating changes in the Jewish experience there over the course of the twentieth century. His recent work has turned to Indiana, where he conducts fieldwork and interviews among people with the neurological disorder known as Tourette Syndrome. In each of these settings, he has asked how changing cultural systems shape notions of self, and conversely, how individual struggles for self-identity influence the development of larger cultural models. This work has been published in a variety of journals in anthropology, sociology, religious studies, and ethnic studies. Dr. Buckser has also published three books on his research: Communities of Faith: Sectarianism, Identity, and Social Change on a Danish Island (Berghahn 1996); After the Rescue: Jewish Identity and Community in Contemporary Denmark (Palgrave Macmillan 2003); and The Anthropology of Religious Conversion (Rowman and Littlefield 2003), edited with Stephen Glazier.

Dr. Buckser received his B.A. in anthropology from Harvard in 1986, and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1993. He helped found the Society for the Anthropology of Religion in 1997; he currently serves on its board, and is chair of the Clifford Geertz Book Prize in the Anthropology of Religion. He has taught at Purdue since 1995, and served as Chair of Anthropology from 2005 to 2008.

 

Mohan Dutta

Communication

mdutta@purdue.edu

Mohan Dutta

Mohan J Dutta began his career at Purdue University in 2001 after completing his PhD in Mass Communication from the University of Minnesota. His research examines marginalization in contemporary healthcare, health care inequalities, the intersections of poverty and health experiences at the margins, the mobilization of cultural tropes for the justification of neo-colonial health development projects, the meanings of health in the realms of marginalized experiences in highly underserved communities in the global South, and the ways in which participatory processes and strategies are organized in marginalized contexts to bring about changes in neo-colonial structures of global oppression and exploitation. Based on his work on healthcare among indigenous communities, sex workers, migrant workers, rural communities and communities living in extreme poverty, he has developed an approach called the culture-centered approach that outlines culturally-based participatory strategies for addressing unequal healthcare policies and global disparities. The culture-centered approach uses a combination of postcolonial deconstruction, resistive strategies for performance and dialogue-based reflexive participation to create entry points for listening to the voices of marginalized communities that have historically been stripped of agency in modernization discourse and constructed as recipients of messages of development. He has authored the book "Communicating health: A culture-centered approach" published by Polity Press, and co-edited "Emerging perspectives in health communication: Meaning, culture, and power" published by Taylor and Francis, and "Communicating for social impact: Engaging communication theory, research, and pedagogy" published by Hampton Press, in addition to authoring approximately 90 or so articles and book chapters. For his scholarly productivity and contributions to health communication, Dr. Dutta was recognized as the Lewis Donohew Outstanding Scholar in Health Communication in 2006. He currently serves as senior editor of the journal Health Communication, newsletter editor of the International Communication Association, is the Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Communication, a service learning fellow at Purdue and a fellow of the Entrepreneurial Leadership Academy where he has been developing a project on leadership in social entrepreneurship. In addition to teaching and writing, Dr. Dutta enjoys spending leisure time with his wife and nine-month old son, stimulating conversations with his advisees, organizing opportunities with grassroots groups, and dancing.

 

Lisa Goffman

Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences

goffman@purdue.edu

Lisa Goffman

Lisa Goffman's research program aims to provide an empirical foundation for understanding both normal and impaired language development, one that incorporates findings about language and motor processes, especially as they apply to learning. To this end, Dr. Goffman uses a combination of methodologies from psycholinguistics and physiology. Results from her studies have shown complex interactivity between language formulation and motor processing, both in normally developing children and in those diagnosed with language impairment. Goffman's research is funded by the National Institutes of Health-National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIH-NIDCD), and has been published in the Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research; Journal of the Acoustical Society of America; Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance; Cognition; and Language and Cognitive Processes, among others. She is an associate editor for Language at the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research and a standing study section member at NIH-NIDCD.

 

Richard Johnson-Sheehan

English

rjohnso@purdue.edu

Richard Johnson-Sheehan

Richard Johnson-Sheehan joined the English Department in 2004. He received his Ph.D. from Iowa State University and taught for nine years at the University of New Mexico. He does research in a variety of areas, including rhetoric of science, technical communication, conservation and environmental writing, and ancient rhetorics. His most recent articles have been on the works of Charles Darwin, Ancient Irish Rhetoric, and Conservation Writing. He is author of a number of textbooks, including Technical Communication Today, now in its third edition. He was made Fellow in the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing in 2008. He has served in a variety of administrative positions, including Director of Introductory Composition at Purdue and Director of Rhetoric and Writing and Director of Professional Writing at University of New Mexico.

 

Ananthanarayan Krishnan

Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences

rkrish@purdue.edu

Ananthanarayan Krishnan

Dr. Krishnan's current research relates to two distinct but related set of experiments related to neural encoding of speech spectra and voice pitch at the level of the auditory brainstem.

1. Experience-dependent plasticity for pitch representation in the brainstem
It is well established that neural processes underlying pitch at the cortical level are influenced by language experience. The question arises whether early, pre-attentive stages of pitch processing at both the brainstem and cortical levels may also be influenced by language experience. Indeed, our lab was the first to report that long-term language experience does influence pre-attentive stages of pitch processing at both the brainstem and cortical levels by enhancing the representation of linguistically relevant dimensions of pitch. The long term objective of this research program is to advance our knowledge of how pitch mechanisms in the auditory brainstem reorganize with experience to enhance encoding of behaviorally relevant dimensions of sounds and to determine their role in the hierarchical processing of the temporal structure of sound.

2. Neural encoding of speech in normal and impaired ears
Knowledge about the characteristics of neural representation of speech in normal and hearing-impaired individuals may shed light on the acoustic features of speech sounds that are important in their identification and the nature of the degradation in representation of these features. Evaluation of several strategies to enhance acoustic features may provide us information about signal processing strategies that will optimally recover degraded representation that may be implemented in hearing prosthetic devices. The aim clearly is to develop an objective electrophysiologic index of the effectiveness of amplification strategies.

 

Susan Morgan

Communication

semorgan@purdue.edu

Susan Morgan

Susan Morgan's approach to research and teaching is as a social scientist, primarily using quantitative (experimental, survey, and content analytic) and qualitative (interview, focus group, and thematic analytic) methods. Her research largely focuses on the construction of persuasive messages to strengthen health communication campaigns. She uses theory and formative research to tailor health messages to the specific needs of multicultural populations (especially African Americans) and youth. Her secondary area of interest is intercultural communication. She also conducts research on intercultural interactions and is interested in people's motivations for seeking out others who are culturally different from themselves. She has also been working toward building a theory of the motivations that affect intercultural communication behaviors.

She has served as co-Investigator on three grants totaling $4 million, and has received additional funding as Principal Investigator or Principal Researcher on four grants totaling over $4 million. She serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Applied Communication Research, as a scientific review panel member for the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control, and the Health Services Resources Administration, and has served as research associate for four research centers in the areas of cancer control, injury prevention, health communication, and mass media effects.

For a list of grants of publications, please see: http://www.cla.purdue.edu/communication/people/smorgan.shtml

 

Nancy Peterson

English

njp@purdue.edu

Nancy Peterson

Nancy J. Peterson came to Purdue in 1991, having earned her Ph.D. in English from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Peterson currently serves as Associate Head for the Department of English at Purdue, and she is an affiliated faculty member of the American Studies and Women's Studies programs. She is a specialist in contemporary American literature and culture, with particular expertise in analyzing women's literature and ethnic texts from interdisciplinary perspectives. A primary focus of her scholarship is on the workings of history and memory in literary, visual, and cultural texts. Dr. Peterson is the author of Against Amnesia: Contemporary Women Writers and the Crises of Historical Memory (U of Pennsylvania P, 2001) and Beloved: Character Studies (Continuum, 2008), and she has edited two collections: Toni Morrison: Critical and Theoretical Approaches (Johns Hopkins UP, 1997) and Conversations with Sherman Alexie (UP of Mississippi, forthcoming).

Along with her work as a scholar and editor, Dr. Peterson has taken an active role in professional organizations related to African American Studies and Native/Indigenous Studies. Her interest in the work of Toni Morrison, the 1993 Nobel Laureate for Literature, is long-standing: she is a lifetime member of the Toni Morrison Society, a scholarly association devoted to studying and teaching the author's works; she serves on the editorial board of the Toni Morrison Review; and she has guest-edited two special issues of the journal Modern Fiction Studies on Morrison's work. She is also involved in the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures and currently serves on the pedagogy committee for the association. She has won several teaching awards over the years at Purdue and at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and was inducted into Purdue's Teaching Academy in October 2008.

 

Porter Shreve

English

pshreve@purdue.edu

Porter Shreve

Porter Shreve is the author of three novels, all with Houghton Mifflin. The Obituary Writer (2000) was a New York Times Notable Book and a Borders Original Voices Selection; Drives Like a Dream (2005) was a Chicago Tribune Book of the Year and a Britannica Book of the Year; and When the White House Was Ours (2008) was a Chicago Tribune Book of the Year and a Reading Group Choices Featured Selection.

Shreve is co-editor of three anthologies with Beacon Press: Outside the Law:
Narratives on Justice (1997); How We Want to Live: Narratives on Progress (1998); and Tales Out of School: Narratives on Education (2000). He is co-editor of three textbooks with Pearson Longman: The Contemporary American Short Story (2003); Contemporary Creative Nonfiction: I & Eye (2004); and 30/30: Thirty Stories from the Last Thirty Years (2005). His short stories, essays, Op-Eds and reviews have appeared in many publications, including Witness, Northwest Review, Salon, the Chicago Tribune, the Washington Post, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Boston Globe and the New York Times.

He has taught undergraduate and graduate fiction writing and literature at the University of Michigan, the University of Oregon, and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He has been at Purdue since Fall 2004, and has been Director of Creative Writing since Fall 2005.

 

Susan Swithers

Psychological Sciences

swithers@psych.purdue.edu

Susan Swithers

Susan E. Swithers has a B.A. from the University of Virginia and a Ph.D. from Duke University. She joined the Purdue faculty in 1995 where she is now a professor of Psychological Sciences and a member of the Ingestive Behavior Research Center. Her research, supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (NICHD and NIDDK), examines the effects of development and experience on regulation of food intake and body weight.

 


Promoted from Assistant Professor to Associate Professor

Julia Chester

Psychological Sciences

jcheste@purdue.edu

Julia Chester

Dr. Chester came to Purdue in 2003 after completing a postdoctoral fellowship at the Indiana University School of Medicine. She received her Ph.D. in Behavioral Neuroscience from Oregon Health and Science University. The main emphasis of Dr. Chester's research program is to study the genetic, environmental, and neurobiological mechanisms that may promote or protect against the development of major mental diseases such as addiction, anxiety disorders, and schizophrenia. A primary area of research is focused on examining the genetic and neurochemical mechanisms that regulate behavioral and motivational effects of alcohol. Dr. Chester has a strong interest in the role of stress and stress hormones in influencing alcohol-seeking behaviors and other behaviors that model abnormal psychological processes and psychiatric disease states in humans.

 

Stacey Connaughton

Communication

sconnaug@purdue.edu

Stacey Connaughton

Dr. Stacey L. Connaughton received her Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. Her research examines identification and leadership in geographically distributed contexts, particularly as these issues relate to virtual teams/virtual organizations and political parties. Her published work has appeared in the Journal of Communication, Management Communication Quarterly, Small Group Research, JASIST, Communication Studies, Communication Yearbook, and her book, Inviting Latino Voters: Party Messages and Latino Party Identification, was published in 2005 by Routledge. Her research is funded by the National Science Foundation, the Carnegie Foundation, and the Russell Sage Foundation. Dr. Connaughton is a Senior Consortium Research Fellow at the U.S. Army Research Institute and is a member of the Advisory Board of the Leadership Institute at ICF International. Dr. Connaughton has facilitated workshops and written guidebooks for corporate, governmental, educational administrative, and student groups in the areas of virtual teams, leadership, team-building, and strategic planning in the United States, Canada, and China. She currently serves as the Secretary of the Organizational Communication Division of the International Communication Association (2007-2009).

 

Paula Leverage

Foreign Languages and Literature

leverage@purdue.edu

Paula Leverage

Paula Leverage received her PhD from the University of Toronto before coming to Purdue. Her research interests in medieval French literature and cognitive literary theory are reflected in her five articles and four book chapters which deal with issues and texts such as dreams in Girart de Roussillon, sexual transformation in Tristan de Nanteuil, Theory of Mind in Le Conte du Graal, and mnemonic and memory in the Old French chansons de geste, and in Camus' L'Étranger. Her book Reception and Memory: A Cognitive Approach to the Chansons de geste, Faux Titre Series, ed. Keith Busby and Michael Freeman (Amsterdam: Rodopi, forthcoming) explores the role of memory in the reception of the Old French epic. She is also co-editor of a collection of essays titled Theory of Mind and Literature, which is in the final stages of completion.

Leverage is the Director of the new Center for Cognitive Literary Studies at Purdue. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on French literature, Old French, and cinema for the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, and the interdisciplinary programs in Medieval and Renaissance Studies (MARS) and Film and Video Studies (FVS). In 2009 she was awarded the College of Liberal Arts Educational Excellence Award in recognition of her contributions to teaching and learning.

 

Song No

Foreign Languages and Literature

sno1@purdue.edu

Song No

Song I. No, associate professor of Spanish, received his Ph.D. in Romance Languages and Literatures from the University of California at Berkeley. His primary fields of research are Latin American literature and Spanish literature. Three particular strands are prominent in his teaching and research plans: orality and writing, with a special interest in cultural encounters of the indigenous and the European; gender studies on women's survival and participation in early modern Spain and colonial Latin America; transculturation processes, which include multilevel cultural interactions between Spain and the Spanish American colonies. No has published articles on Bartolomé de las Casas, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Titu Cusi Yupanqui, and Fernando Ortiz. In 2008 his book-length study of Latin American cultural theories, entitled Cien años de contrahegemonía: Un análisis de transculturación y heterogeneidad cultural, was published by the National University of San Marcos, Peru. He has received grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. For his research on the first Peruvian-Chinese philosopher, Pedro Zulen, Song No received the Academic Recognition Award from the Universidad Mayor de San Marcos in 2006.

 

Michael Salvo

English

salvo@purdue.edu

Michael Salvo

After completing his PhD at Texas Tech, Prof. Salvo spent three years at Northeastern University before joining the Rhetoric & Composition Program at Purdue. His research explores professional & technical writing and rhetoric, particularly ethical issues related to writing with digital technology in academic and nonacademic settings. He leads a group of usability researchers testing Purdue's Online Writing Lab. His recent publications include:

"User-Centered Technology in Participatory Culture: Two Decades 'Beyond a Narrow Conception of Usability Testing' " with Robert R. Johnson and Meredith Zoetewey in IEEE-PCS

"Participatory Assessment: Negotiating Engagement in a Technical Communication Program in Technical Communication with Jingfan Ren

"A Case of Exhaustive Documentation: Re-centering System-oriented Organizations Around User Need" with Meredith Zoetewey and D. Kate Agena in Technical Communication

"The Distributed gesamptkunstwerk: Sound, Worlding, and New Media Culture" with Thomas Rickert in Computer and Composition journal's special issue Sound in/as Composition Space (winner of the Computers and Composition Journal's 2006 Ellen Nold Award)

"And they had pro tools ... " with Thomas Rickert in Computers and Composition Online's issue on sound in new media (winner of the Kairos 2007 Best Webtext Award)

"Rhetoric as Productive Technology: Cultural Studies in/as Technical Communication Methodology" Chapter 9 in Scott, Longo, Willis (Eds) Critical Power Tools: Technical Communication and Cultural Studies. SUNY Press

 

Ryan Schneider

English

rschneider@purdue.edu

Ryan Schneider

Ryan Schneider holds a B.A. in History and Literature from Harvard as well as an M.A. and a Ph.D. in English from Duke. He specializes in nineteenth-century American and African American literature with particular emphasis on Transcendentalism, Critical Race Theory, and intellectual history. His current research focuses on cognitive approaches to literature, especially nonfiction and autobiographical writing, and his book, The Public Intellectualism of Ralph Waldo Emerson and W.E.B. Du Bois: Emotional Dimensions of Race and Reform, will be published by Palgrave-Macmillan as part of their Cognitive Studies in Literature and Performance series. His articles have appeared in American Transcendental Quarterly, Arizona Quarterly, and edited collections published by the university presses of Columbia, Duke, and Purdue. Professor Schneider teaches a wide range of courses for both the English Department and the Program in American Studies; he has received numerous teaching awards at both the undergraduate and graduate levels; and he is a two-time recipient of the Center for Undergraduate Instructional Excellence Fellowship. Professor Schneider also is a founding member of the Cancer, Culture, and Community Program (CCC): a joint venture involving the College of Liberal Arts and the Oncological Sciences Center in Discovery Park. The CCC Program explores the human response to cancer as expressed through art and literature and helps organize an annual symposium featuring presentations by prominent writers and artists whose work addresses various aspects of cancer's effects on the lives of individuals, families, and communities.

 

Amanda Seidl

Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences

aseidl@purdue.edu

Amanda Seidl

Amanda Seidl received her undergraduate degree from Smith College in 1993, and her Ph.D. in linguistics from the University of Pennsylvania in 2000. Her doctoral work, Minimal Indirect Reference: A Theory of the Syntax-Phonology Interface, was published by Routledge in 2001. She was a post-graduate fellow in cognitive science at Johns Hopkins University from 2000 - 2003.

Dr. Seidl's research, which has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, examines the ways in which infants and young children acquire language and, more particularly, the sound systems of their native languages. In experimental studies she has conducted as director of the Purdue Infant Speech Lab, Dr. Seidl has investigated the ways in which infants find word-like or sentence-like units in the continuous flow of speech that they hear every day from their caregivers. Further, she has attempted to determine the extent to which infants are able to learn unfamiliar sound patterns that are or are not present in human language. Her work has revealed much about early infant speech processing and has shown that infants have a remarkable ability to learn complex and abstract sound patterns long before they are able to produce meaningful speech. Dr. Seidl hopes to explore the clinical significance of these findings in future research.

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