Spring 2007

Promoted to professor from associate professor

Kevin B. Anderson

Political Science

kbanders@purdue.edu

Kevin B. Anderson

Kevin B. Anderson is a Professor of Political Science at Purdue University, with affiliate appointments in Sociology and Women’s Studies.  Before coming to Purdue in 2002, he was Professor of Sociology at Northern Illinois University.  He holds an MA and a PhD in Sociology from the City University of New York Graduate Center, and a BA in History from Trinity College, Hartford.  His research and teaching interests are in political and social theory, especially Marx, Hegel, the Frankfurt School, Foucault, and the Orientalism debate. He is the author of Lenin, Hegel, and Western Marxism: A Critical Study (Illinois, 1995; Chinese edition forthcomong) and the co-author of Foucault and the Iranian Revolution: Gender and the Seductions of Islamism (Chicago, 2005).  He is the co-editor of several volumes, including Marx on Suicide (Northwestern, 1999, also published in German and in Persian), Erich Fromm and Critical Criminology (2000), and The Rosa Luxemburg Reader (Monthly Review, 2004, Persian edition forthcoming). Currently, he is a participant in the Marx-Engels Gesamtausgabe, an international project to publish the whole of the writings of Marx and Engels, for which he is helping to edit a volume on non-Western societies and gender. He has been awarded an American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship (1996), the International Erich Fromm Prize (with Richard Quinney, 2000), a National Endowment for the Humanities Collaborative Research Grant (2001), and the Latifeh Yarshater Award for the Best Book in Iranian Women’s Studies (with Janet Afary, 2006).

 

Michael Bergmann

Philosophy

bergmann@purdue.edu

Michael Bergmann

Michael Bergmann received his BA and MA from the University of Waterloo in the province of Ontario, Canada.  In 1997 he completed his PhD at the University of Notre Dame and was hired that same year by the philosophy department at Purdue University.  His main areas of research and teaching are epistemology, metaphysics, and philosophy of religion.  He is the author of Justification without Awareness: A Defense of Epistemic Externalism (Oxford University Press, 2006) as well as numerous articles on topics such as epistemic internalism and externalism, skepticism, freedom and responsibility, the problem of evil, and the metaphysics of necessity and possibility.  In 2004 he was named a University Faculty Scholar, a designation that recognizes outstanding faculty members at Purdue University who are on an accelerated path for academic distinction.

 

Donal E. Carlston

Psychological Sciences

donal.e.carlston.1@purdue.edu

 

Robin Clair

Communication

rpclair@purdue.edu

Robin Clair

Robin Patric Clair received a Bachelor of Art in Art Education degree from the University of Cincinnati.  After working as a technical artist for several years, she returned to school to earn both a Master’s of Art and Ph.D. in Communication from Cleveland State University and Kent State University, respectively.  Professor Clair taught at Cleveland State University before joining the Purdue faculty in 1991.  She has been teaching organizational communication and related courses for twenty years. Her main research area is organizational communication.  She studies a wide range of topics from a narrative perspective, including: sequestered stories of sexual harassment, “real job” stories and their impact on work socialization, the rhetorical strategies of labor organizing, and narratives from a working class neighborhood.  She received the Outstanding Book of the Year Award (2000) for her book entitled, Organizing Silence: A World of Possibilities.  In 2004, she received the Outstanding Book of the Year Award as editor of the collection Expressions of Ethnography: Novel Approaches to Qualitative Methods.  She holds the prestigious Golden Anniversary Award from the National Communication Association for her research on sexual harassment.  Professor Clair has received five engagement grants within the last two years to help local nonprofit organizations with their communication, public relations and advertising.   At the graduate level, Professor Clair teaches interpretive and ethnographic methods as well as narrative theory and the rhetoric of race, class and gender.  She coauthored her most recent book, Why Work: The Perceptions of a Real Job and the Rhetoric of Work through the Ages  (forthcoming--Purdue University Press) with four Purdue University honor students and plans to use it in a new course, entitled Diversity at Work.

 

Rosemary Kilmer

Patti and Rusty Rueff Department of Visual and Performing Arts

rkilmer@purdue.edu

Rosemary Kilmer

Rosemary Kilmer received her BFA degree in Environmental Design, the MA in Art Education, and the MFA in Design, all from Arizona State University.  She is an NCIDQ certified interior designer and has designed numerous projects in healthcare, corporate, hospitality and residential environments in her own practice.

Ms. Kilmer specializes in research in lighting design, color theory, building codes, and energy conservation and sustainability.  She has co-authored two major textbooks entitled “Designing Interiors” and “Construction Drawings and Details for Interiors: Basic Skills”.  These textbooks have been adopted by over 200 colleges and universities throughout the world. Designing Interiors was translated for a Korean edition, and Construction Drawings and Details for Interiors: Basic Skills has been published in the Chinese language. 

The author has presented over 100 design and technical presentations at juried conferences and currently serves on the Evaluation Committee and as a Chair for Site Visiting Teams for the Council of Interior Design Accreditation (formerly FIDER).  She has visited and evaluated over 20 interior design programs for accreditation.  She has served as the Vice President for Exam Development for The National Council for Interior Design Qualifications and has been a National Director and president of the Indiana State Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers.  She has received several awards for her service to the interior design profession.

In 2006 she became a LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Accredited Professional, a designation that distinguishes building professionals with the knowledge and skills to successfully steward the integrated design and LEED certification process of green buildings.

 

Windell H. Kilmer

Patti and Rusty Rueff Department of Visual and Performing Arts

wkilmer@purdue.edu

Windell H. Kilmer

W. Otie Kilmer received his Bachelor of Architecture degree from The University of New Mexico and a Master of Fine Arts degree from Arizona State University. He is a registered architect and worked in several prominent architectural/interior design firms, which included three of the Gensler and Associates branch offices – a firm that is an internationally recognized and award winning architectural/interiors firm. Mr. Kilmer has designed many projects, including restaurants, custom homes, apartments, offices, medical clinics, dental clinics, and others. He has also won many awards for design, including first place in a statewide Habitat for Humanity competition, sponsored by the American Institute of Architects (Indianapolis chapter).

He has taught architecture and interior design at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo, Colorado State University, and the University of Hawaii before joining Purdue University in 1982.

Merging his research, professional practice, and teaching, he has presented at many conferences and presentations, as well as a co-author of two books on interior design. These books are currently being used in over 200 national and international universities, and have been translated into the Chinese and Korean languages.

Mr. Kilmer has received several teaching awards and his students have won many design awards in competitions. He currently teaches architectural/interior detailing concepts and applications at both the undergraduate and graduate levels at Purdue.

 

Robert P. Lamb

English

lambr@purdue.edu

Robert P. Lamb

Bob Lamb with three of his former Purdue students: from left, Maria Windell, a Jefferson Fellow in English at the University of Virginia currently writing her dissertation; Kip Robisch, a professor in English at Purdue whose book on the wolf in North American literature will be published next year; and Jenny Wright, a graduate of Syracuse Law School and attorney at Ice Miller Donadio and Ryan in Indianapolis.

Bob received his doctorate in the History of American Civilization at Harvard University and came to Purdue in 1991, where he specializes in American literature from the mid nineteenth through the mid twentieth century.  He co-edited A Companion to American Fiction, 1865-1914, and is the author of a monograph on southern abolitionism and two dozen articles on such authors and topics as Melville, Whitman, Twain, Hemingway, naturalism, literary theory, and film.  He recently completed a lengthy book manuscript entitled “Hemingway and the Modern Short Story” and is currently writing a book entitled “Citizen Twain: Subjectivity and Cultural Critique in the Works of Samuel Langhorne Clemens.”  Bob has received over thirty teaching honors, including Harvard’s Stephen J. Botein Prize, and Purdue’s University (Murphy) Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching and the Liberal Arts Departmental Award for Educational Excellence.  He was inducted into Purdue’s Book of Great Teachers in 2003.  He is especially proud of the success of his Purdue students.  Over the past sixteen years, thirty-five of his undergraduates have received scholarships to leading graduate schools and eighteen have gone on to law school.  Thirty-four of his graduate student dissertators have become professors and fifteen have published their dissertations as books.

 

James McCann

Political Science

mccannj@purdue.edu

James McCann

Originally from the Chicago area, James A. McCann came to Purdue University in 1991 after earning his doctorate in Political Science at the University of Colorado-Boulder and working as a teaching fellow and consultant at Harvard University. McCann conducts research on public opinion, participation, political parties, and representation, both in the United States and abroad. His work has appeared in the American Political Science Review, the British Journal of Political Science, the Latin American Research Review, and many other professional journals. He is the co-author of Democratizing Mexico: Public Opinion and Electoral Choices (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996).

Professor McCann is currently exploring the incorporation of immigrants into American civic life. He is the Principal Investigator of the 2006 Mexican Expatriate Study, an extensive survey of Mexican immigrants in Dallas, San Diego, and north-central Indiana. When we think of popular destinations for migrants, Indiana may not spring immediately to mind. Over the last fifteen years, however, hundreds of thousands have settled in our state. How do patterns of civic engagement among immigrants in Indiana differ from those in the southwest? What role do parties, campaigns, and social movements play in incorporating immigrants? In an upcoming book, McCann delves into these questions.

When not in the office or in class, McCann might be seen jogging around the West Lafayette Celery Bog, gardening, or playing guitar.

 

Donald Platt

English

plattd@purdue.edu

Donald Platt

Donald Platt is the author of three volumes of poetry.  His most recent book is My Father Says Grace (2007), published by the University of Arkansas Press.  His first two books are Fresh Peaches, Fireworks, & Guns (1994) and Cloud Atlas (2002), both published by Purdue University Press as winners of the Verna Emery Poetry Prize.  His chapbook Leap Second at the Turn of the Millennium (1999) won the Center for Book Arts Poetry Chapbook Prize and was printed in a fine-press edition by the Center.  His poems have appeared in many journals, including The New Republic, The Nation, The Paris Review, Poetry, The Kenyon Review, The Georgia Review, Ploughshares, TriQuarterly, The Virginia Quarterly Review, Shenandoah, The Iowa Review, The Southwest Review, Western Humanities Review, and The Southern Review, as well as in The Best American Poetry 2000 and 2006 and The Pushcart Prize XXVII and XXIX (2003 and 2005 editions).  He is a recipient of a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Paumanok Poetry Prize, and the “Discovery”/The Nation Prize. A professor of English at Purdue University, he lives in West Lafayette, Indiana, with his wife, the poet Dana Roeser, and their two daughters.

 

Nicholas K. Rauh

Foreign Languages and Literatures

rauhn@purdue.edu

Nicholas K. Rauh

Nicholas Rauh, Professor of Classics in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literature, received his PhD in Ancient History from UNC-Chapel Hill. He specializes in Roman history and archaeology and publishes in the area of Roman maritime culture. For the past decade he has directed the Rough Cilicia Archaeological Survey Project on the south coast of Turkey. Funded by the National Science Foundation Rauh is mapping archaeological remains in a region reportedly dominated by pirates during Hellenistic times. Students interested in participating on Rauh’s survey may register with his Anatolian Archaeology Field School via Purdue’s Study Abroad Program. In addition to specialized courses in Greco-Roman history, Rauh offers a number of survey courses for non-majors, including CLCS 181: Classical World Civilizations, CLCS 380: Alexander the Great; CLCS 381: Julius Caesar.

 


Promoted to clinical associate professor from assistant professor

Susan M. Flynn

Health and Kinesiology

flynnsm@purdue.edu

Susan M. Flynn

Susan Flynn has been a faculty member at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana since 1997.  Flynn works in the Health and Kinesiology Department training students in sport pedagogy.  She teaches Adapted Physical Education; Rhythms and Dance in the PE Curriculum, Secondary Methods, and supervises student teachers.  Prior to Purdue, Flynn taught in the public schools outside of Toledo, Ohio as an Adapted Physical Education Specialist.  In addition, she directed the Perceptual Motor Development Clinic at the University of Toledo for 10 years, where she conducted aquatic and motor therapy for children with disabilities.

Flynn is actively involved in the Indiana State Association, the Midwest District and the National Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance.  Flynn’s passion is working with college students to help them become professional leaders. She endeavors to develop enthusiastic student leaders who lead by example and embrace the importance of helping young people value an active and healthy lifestyle.

 


Promoted to associate professor from assistant professor

Petronio A. Bendito

Patti and Rusty Rueff Department of Visual and Performing Arts

pbendito@purdue.edu

Petronio A. Bendito

Petronio Bendito works in a variety of computer-based art forms and has exhibited his work nationally and internationally.

He has a MFA in visual communication and earned a doctoral degree (Ed.D) in instructional technology from Northern Illinois University.He teaches computer-based motion design, color theory, and web design for visual communications majors at Purdue.

Bendito has presented at national and international professional meetings, including AIC, CAA, IVLA, and  SIGGRAPH.

He serves on the Board of Directors of the International Visual Literacy Association. He is also a member of the editorial board of the journal Media-N, which is specialized in new media arts. Currently he is co-chairing the IVLA 2007 International Conference: visual literacy beyond frontiers -  information, culture and diversity (Curitiba, Braizil) and is a member of the international program committee for the IASTED International Conference on Visual Communications, which is to take place in Innsbruck, Austria from March 17, 2008 to March 19, 2008.

Dr. Bendito's major research interests are in the areas of digital art, human-computer conceptual models of color selection systems, color aesthetics, motion design, and computer-enhanced educational technology.

Currently he is working with the American University of Paris to develop interdisciplinary courses and study abroad program.

 

Joel R. Ebarb

Patti and Rusty Rueff Department of Visual and Performing Arts

jebarb@purdue.edu

Joel R. Ebarb

Joel Ebarb (Costume Design) has designed costumes for over 70 productions in a variety of venues, including Off-Broadway for Jean Cocteau Repertory (Ibsen’s The Wild Duck), Eclipse Theatre Company and Vittum Theatre (Chicago), Indiana Repertory Theatre, Phoenix Theatre, and ShadowApe Theatre Company (Indianapolis), Boarshead Theatre (Lansing, Michigan), Stages Repertory Theatre (Houston), and eighteen seasons with the Texas Shakespeare Festival (having designed costumes for over twenty productions at TSF since 1989). His work has been seen internationally in Beijing, China (The Miracle Worker) and at the Arezzo Festival, Italy (The Patriot Act). Joel is Co-Commissioner of the USITT (United States Institute for Theatre Technology) Costume Design & Technology Commission, a member of the OISTAT (International Organization of Scenographers, Theatre Architects and Technicians) Costume Working Group, and a member of the Advisory Board for Eclipse Theatre Company. A native of Shreveport, Louisiana, Joel received a B.A. in English from Northwestern State University of Louisiana and his M.F.A. in Theatre from the University of Houston, where he served as a production intern with Houston Ballet. His research and teaching specialties are the history and development of period and regional style and adornment in Western civilization.

 

Elizabeth A. Hoffmann

Sociology and Anthropology

hoffmanne@purdue.edu

Elizabeth A. Hoffmann

Elizabeth A. Hoffmann came to Purdue in 2001 from the University of Wisconsin where she received a Ph.D. in Sociology and a J.D. in law.  Her research links the areas of Work & Organizations and Law & Society to examine how people understand and relate to the laws and rules that affect their daily lives.

From the Work & Organizations area, Hoffmann received the Industrial Relations Research Association (IRRA) First  Place award for her doctoral research and the Second Place award from the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.  More recently, her work was honored as one of the five best papers at the Labor and Employment Relations Association 2005 annual meeting.  Additionally, she was invited to speak to the Industrial Relations Department at the London School of Economics and Political Science in Spring, 2005.

In the Law & Society area, Hoffmann was offered one of the highly selective, fully-paid fellowships to the 2003 Summer Institute, co-sponsored by the Law & Society Association and the Center for the Study of Law.  Earlier, her paper, “Confrontations and Compromise,” won a best paper award in 2001 from the American Bar Foundation.

Recognition of Hoffmann’s research has also come through various grant awards.  In addition to receiving many Purdue faculty grants, her research has received funding from the National Science Foundation, the American Sociological Association, and the Midwest Sociologists for Women in Society.

 

Jessica Huber

Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences

jhuber@purdue.edu

Jessica Huber

Jessica E. Huber received her Ph.D. in Speech Science from the University at Buffalo - State University of New York in June 2001. She joined the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at Purdue University in Fall 2001. The overarching goal of her research is to examine issues related to the neuromotor control of the speech system, with an emphasis on the control of the respiratory and laryngeal systems. She collects data from multiple systems involved in speech simultaneously in order to examine how control across the systems is coordinated to achieve the goals of speech. She is interested in how higher-level functions (cognitive load, linguistic complexity, and perception of task or goal of speech) alter the mechanisms used to achieve speech goals. She also studies how these functions differ with normal aging (young and older adults) and clinical status (non-impaired speakers and individuals with Parkinson’s disease).

Her research is relevant to understanding the mechanisms underlying speech disturbances associated with motor speech disorders, like Parkinson’s disease, and the design and implementation of speech therapy for these patients. Individuals with Parkinson’s disease are believed to have difficulty setting targets or goals for movement and to have impaired self-perception. Currently, she is studying the effects of increasing loudness on respiratory kinematics in normal speakers and individuals with Parkinson's disease. She is also interested in the changes to prosody (speech melody) as a result of Parkinson’s disease. Her research involving should provide insight into the neural mechanisms involved in the speech deficits commonly seen in individuals with Parkinson’s disease.

 

Michael Jacovides

Philosophy

jacovides@purdue.edu

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Michael Jacovides received his B.A. in philosophy from Stanford University and his Ph.D. in philosophy from UCLA.  Before joining the Purdue philosophy department in 2001, he had one-year jobs at Yale University, University of Massachusetts (Amherst), and University of Virginia. Most of his work has been on Locke’s epistemology and metaphysics, focusing in particular on Locke’s attempts to give philosophical support to the new science of the seventeenth century and on his accounts of the subjectivity of colors, tastes, sounds, and smells.  Jacovides has co-authored a paper on Plato and has been branching out to work on Hume, Descartes, and contemporary philosophy of mind.  His publications include “Locke’s Resemblance Theses” and “Locke on the Semantics of Secondary-Quality Words: A Reply to Matthew Stuart,” in Philosophical Review and “How is Descartes’s Argument Against Skepticism Better Than Putnam’s?” in Philosophical Quarterly

 

Patrick P. Kain

Philosophy

kain@purdue.edu

Patrick P. Kain

Patrick Kain, a specialist in moral philosophy and the philosophy of Immanuel Kant (1724-1804), has been promoted to the rank of Associate Professor of Philosophy.  Kain’s research highlights oft-neglected features of Kant’s moral philosophy and of its relation to other disciplines, inviting a reevaluation of modern and specifically Kantian ethics and its contemporary significance.

His study of the anthropological, biological, psychological and metaphysical foundations of Kant’s conception of human dignity, including work at the Kant-Archiv (Marburg, Germany) on Kant’s literary remains and notes from Kant’s lectures, has been supported by the Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung.  Co-editor of Essays on Kant’s Anthropology (Cambridge, 2003), Kain’s examinations of Kant’s ethics, anthropology, philosophy of religion, and contemporary Kantian ethics appear in The Journal of the History of Philosophy, Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie, Kantian Review, Philosophy Compass, and several essay collections. 

Kain received his MA and PhD in Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame, where he was a Mellon Fellow in the Humanities, and was Fulbright Graduate Fellow at Eberhard-Karls-Universität, Tübingen, Germany.  As an undergraduate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Kain majored in Philosophy and Political Science.  Before coming to Purdue in 2000, Kain taught philosophy at Calvin College.

 

Erina L. MacGeorge

Communication

emacgeorge@purdue.edu

Erina L. MacGeorge

Sorin A. Matei

Communication

smatei@purdue.edu

Sorin A. Matei

Dr. Sorin Adam Matei, Associate Professor Department of Communication, Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
sorin@matei.org
smatei@purdue.edu
765 494 7780

Websites
Personal: http://www.matei.org
Teaching: http://www.matei.org/ithink
Research: http://www.visiblepast.net * http://www.alterpode.con * http://www.mentalmaps.info
Romanian: http://www.pagini.com

 

Christopher J. Pincock

Philosophy

pincock@purdue.edu

Christopher J. Pincock

Chris has been at Purdue since 2002, when he received his Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley with a dissertation on the philosophical problems raised by the use of mathematics in science. He continues to pursue that research topic with a recent paper "A Role for Mathematics in the Physical Sciences" (Nous 41 (2007): 253-272). Chris' other main research project traces the history of English-language philosophy in the early 20th-century, with a special emphasis on the interactions between philosophy, mathematics and science. His main focus is on the movement known as "analytic philosophy" that originated with the work of Gottlob Frege, G. E. Moore and Bertrand Russell. His chapter "Russell, Carnap and the External World" will appear in the Cambridge Companion to Carnap (Cambridge University Press, 2007).

 

Thomas J. Rickert

English

trickert@purdue.edu

 

Shirley Rietdyk

Health and Kinesiology

srietdyk@purdue.edu

 

Seokbo S. Shim

Patti and Rusty Rueff Department of Visual and Performing Arts

ssshim@purdue.edu

Seokbo S. Shim

Scott Shim was recently promoted to an Associate Professor of Industrial Design at Purdue University after serving as an Assistant Professor since 2003.  He received his Bachelor’s in Industrial Design from University of Illinois–Chicago and a Master of Arts in design development from the Ohio State University.

Professor Shim’s professional experience includes 10+ years in product development, during which he has received more than 30 design patents and multiple design awards. He spent majority of his professional career at Daewoo Electronics Design Center where he was involved in various consumer electronics projects for both domestic and international markets.

Since joining Purdue University, Professor Shim has integrated his personal design philosophy into pragmatic education methods which together serve as a foundation for recent success in the field of Industrial Design. His design work has won international recognitions through awards and exhibitions with many of his work appearing in a number of national and international publications, including the cover of the TIME Magazine.

Professor Shim continues active design consulting for various international clients. His special interest in strategic design process and innovative new product development help him elaborate novel ideas and strategies that meet the need of wide range of consumers.

 

Mangala Subramaniam

Sociology and Anthropology

mangala@purdue.edu

Mangala Subramaniam

Dr. Subramaniam received her Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut in May 2001 and joined the Purdue University faculty in August 2001.  She has authored and co-authored articles in journals such as: Critical Sociology, Mobilization and Gender & Society.  Her monograph, The Power of Women's Organizing: Gender, Caste, and Class in India (2006) focuses on the women’s movement in India with specific attention to dalit women’s organizing. Her forthcoming co-edited volume examines the gendered dimension of dowry and marriage among Asian Indians in the Diaspora.  She received an American Sociological Association/National Science Foundation Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline award in 2004 to examine women’s empowerment as a two level effect, individual and group, using advanced statistical models.  She has three ongoing research projects. The two funded projects will examine (a) how NGOs strategically deploy scripts to disseminate information on HIV/AIDS and (b) how communities collectively respond to using and saving water in India in the context of globalization. The third project pertains to the role of the state in outsourcing in the IT industry as a transnational phenomenon (India and the U.S.).  In spring 2007, her water and outsourcing projects involved two undergraduate students through DURI scholarships (Purdue’s Discovery Park).  Dr. Subramaniam mentors undergraduate and graduate students.  She teaches the required courses in statistics at the undergraduate level and the research methods course at the graduate level and offers, Global Social Movements, a new undergraduate sociology course she developed through a grant.  Her recent graduate course offerings are: sociology of gender and social movements.

 

John D. Sundquist

Foreign Languages and Literatures

sundquist@purdue.edu

John D. Sundquist

Before coming to Purdue in 2002, John Sundquist completed his Ph.D. and M.A. in Germanic Linguistics at Indiana University, Bloomington.  He earned his B.A. in German and English from Valparaiso University.   As a recipient of a Fulbright Scholarship, Sundquist worked on his dissertation in historical linguistics at universities in Tromsø and Trondheim in Norway.  He also spent several years studying and conducting research on the German language in various parts of Germany, including Reutlingen, Cologne, and Hamburg.  Over the past several years at Purdue, Sundquist has published his work in a variety of journals in the field of linguistics, most recently in Diachronica:  International Journal of Historical Linguistics and ina book chapter of Historical Linguistics 2006 (John Benjamins)He is a recipient of a Library Scholars Grant from Purdue for archival research in Lübeck, Germany and he was recently invited to speak at an upcoming conference on language change at Cambridge University.  Sundquist is the Testing Chair for the Indiana Chapter of the American Association of Teachers of German and is an active member of American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages and the Society for Germanic Linguistics.

Sundquist’s research interests include diachronic syntax of the Germanic languages; morphosyntactic theory; historical sociolinguistics of the Germanic languages; and second language acquisition and theories of language learning.

 

Jian Wang

Communication

jianwang@purdue.edu

 

Jennifer M. William

Foreign Languages and Literatures

jmwilliam@purdue.edu

Jennifer M. William

Jennifer William graduated from Ohio State University in 2002 with a PhD in German literature. She has an MA from the University of Georgia and a BA from Berry College. She spent two years studying in Germany, at the University of Rostock in the former East Germany, 1994-95, and at the Free University in Berlin, 1998-99. Since arriving at Purdue in Fall 2002, William has taught a variety of courses on German language, culture, literature, and film. She is an affiliated faculty member with Purdue’s Film/Video Studies, Jewish Studies, and Women’s Studies programs. Her research, which focuses primarily on twentieth and twenty-first century literature and film, has been featured in academic journals such as German Studies Review, Germanic Review, and the Journal of the Kafka Society of America. She has presented her work at regional, national, and international meetings, including the New Europe at the Crossroads Conference in Berlin, the International Bertolt Brecht Society Symposium in Augsburg, and the European Cinema Research Forum in Leeds, England. William’s current research project considers questions of ethics and aesthetics in cinematic representations of the Holocaust and the Nazi era. Her additional interest in the intersections of cognition and literature has led to her involvement on the organizing committee for the interdisciplinary conference Theory of Mind and Literature, which will take place at Purdue in November 2007.

Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (765) 494-4600

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