Fall 2011

David C. Atkinson

Assistant Professor, History, UNIV

atkinsod@purdue.edu

David C. Atkinson

David Atkinson is an Assistant Professor of History in the Department of History. He received his Ph.D. in History from Boston University in 2010, his M.A. in History from Boston University in 2004, and his BA in American Studies from Manchester University, England, in 1999. He taught in the Social Science Division at Boston University's College of General Studies before coming to Purdue. His research interests focus on U.S. foreign relations, with a particular emphasis on new cultural, international, and transnational approaches. His current research explores the domestic, imperial, and international tensions that accompanied Asian immigration restriction in the American West and the British Empire's settler colonies. He is the author of a book entitled "In Theory and in Practice: Harvard's Center for International Affairs, 1958-1983," and he is also working on a new project that explores the relationship between culture and power in American foreign relations during the Cold War.

 

David Brulé

Assistant Professor, Political Science, BRNG

dbrule@purdue.edu

David Brulé

David Brulé is joining the Department of Political Science at Purdue. Previously, David was an assistant professor at the University of Tennessee. He has also taught at the University of North Texas and the Lauder School of Government in Herzliya, Israel. A fifth-generation Texan, David received his Ph.D. from Texas A&M University and his BA from Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches.

David's research interests lie at the intersection of domestic politics and international relations. Specifically, he examines the effects of public opinion, economic conditions, and political institutions on national leaders' conflict decisions. His research has been published in Journal of Conflict Resolution, Journal of Peace Research, Foreign Policy Analysis, International Studies Perspectives, International Studies Review, International Studies Quarterly, as well as edited volumes.

 

Bryce Carlson

Assistant Professor, Anthropology, STON

bryce@purdue.edu

Bryce Carlson

"Bryce Carlson is joining the Department of Anthropology after earning his Ph.D. in Anthropology from Emory University. Before moving to Atlanta for graduate work, he earned his BS in Biology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

From adaptation and evolution to nutrition and health, Bryce's research seeks to characterize and investigate the significance various nutrients, whole foods, and characteristics of the dietary niche had (and continue to have) on the evolution of our species. To do so, his most recent and ongoing work utilizes stable isotopic analyses to characterize the dietary ecology of wild chimpanzees and develop methods to reconstruct an organism's dietary history from the recent (months) or distant (millions of years) past."

 

Aaron Hoffman

Associate Professor, Political Science, BRNG

ahoffman@purdue.edu

Aaron Hoffman

Aaron M. Hoffman (B.A. Columbia University; MA and Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science. His research revolves around issues of bargaining, communication, and security in world politics.  He explores the intersection of these themes in projects on the media and terrorism and on U.S. foreign policy that emphasize the role democratic institutions and citizens play in shaping international and national security environments.  Professor Hoffman also has ongoing research on trust in international relations. His recent work appears in outlets such as Journal of Peace Research, International Interactions, and Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. Professor Hoffman teaches courses on international relations theory, transnational terrorism, international cooperation, and US foreign policy.

 

Nathan R. Johnson

Assistant Professor, English, HEAV

nrjohnson@purdue.edu

Nathan R. Johnson

Nathan R. Johnson is an Assistant Professor in the English Department where he will be a part of the Professional Writing and the Rhetoric and Composition programs. He is coming to Purdue from the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he earned his PhD in Information Studies.

He also holds an MA in Library & Information Studies from UW-Madison, an MA in Communication and Rhetoric from the University of Washington in Seattle, and a BS in Business Administration from Minnesota State University.

Nate's research interests involve rhetorics of information infrastructure, technical standards, interaction design, and technoscience. His most recent work has explored how web professionals argue about web standardization. He has also published and presented research on web protest movements, infrastructural development, and the history of information science as a discipline.

In addition to his academic work, Nate has a professional background in user experience design. While in graduate school, he worked full-time as a user experience designer for a small startup company located in Madison, WI. This work involved developing online literacy tools for K-12 educators. His academic interests often dovetail with his former professional life as he often draws from his background as a designer for his research and teaching: one of his career ambitions is to educate future web professionals.

 

Su'ad Abdul Khabeer

Assistant Professor, Anthropology, STON

sak@purdue.edu

Su'ad Abdul Khabeer

Su'ad Abdul Khabeer is an assistant professor of Anthropology and African American Studies at Purdue University. She received her PhD in Cultural Anthropology from Princeton University and her BSFS from Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service. In her research she uses ethnography and performance art to explore the intersection of race, religion and popular culture. Her most recent work explores the ways young Chicago Muslims negotiate their religious, racial and cultural identities through hip hop. Her future projects will look at the relationship between sound, blackness and Islam in America and the role of Muslim hip hop in US cultural diplomacy efforts. In addition to her academic writing and publications, her poetry was featured in the anthology Living Islam Out Loud: American Muslim Women Speak. She has a commitment to public scholarship and has written for the Washington Post, theRoot.com and blogs for the Huffington Post. She is also a Senior Project Advisor for the US Public Television award-winning documentary, New Muslim Cool.

 

Tom Mustillo

Assistant Professor, Political Science, BRNG

tmustill@purdue.edu

Tom Mustillo

Tom Mustillo is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science. He received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2007) and his BA from the University of Notre Dame (1991)

His research focuses on party politics, political representation, democratization, and social policy. His interests are broadly comparative, though he has a particular expertise in Latin American politics. Professor Mustillo has traveled extensively in the region, including Ecuador, Haiti, Costa Rica, Chile, Mexico and Venezuela. His work has appeared in Political Analysis, The Journal of Politics, and Comparative Political Studies.

Professor Mustillo's current work looks at how politicians use social programs to win electoral support, either by campaigning to deliver benefits broadly to the population, or by targeting goods narrowly to pet constituencies.

 

Doug Osman

Clinical Assistant Professor, Communication, BRNG

dosman@purdue.edu

Doug Osman

Doug Osman is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Brian Lamb School of Communication. He received his M.A. from Michigan State University (1988) and also studied at the University of Michigan and the University of South Florida. In addition to teaching for the past 25 years, he has worked as an independent documentary and filmmaker, working in nearly every format of electronic media production. His work has screened at film and media festivals around the world, including the Sedona International Film Festival and the Golden Lion Festival in South Africa. His interests include production outreach, using converged media as a means of bringing remote educational opportunities and experiences into K-12 classrooms via the internet, and environmental documentary filmmaking. Recent works include a series of documentary collaborations with The Nature Conservancy, exploring that organization's property in the environmentally-sensitive Green Swamp of North Carolina.

 

Min Kim Park

Assistant Professor, Visual and Performing Arts, PAO

park500@purdue.edu

Min Kim Park

Min Kim Park is an Assistant Professor of Photography in the Department of Art and Design at Purdue University. She received a MFA degree in Photography from the University of New Mexico and a BA in Journalism and Communication from St. Louis University. As an interdisciplinary artist, Min Kim Park has been exploring the issues revolving around gender, ethnicity and identity using performance, video, photography, sound and video installation. Her work draws much from her experience as a journalist in Korea News Daily and Korean American Broadcasting Co. in Chicago. Her work has been exhibited at the Museum of Fine Arts in Santa Fe, Arizona State University, University of Houston, Emory University and her recent work, Zummarella was screened at White Box, New York City in 2010. She is also a recipient of artist in residency in Bemis Center for Contemporary Art and Rosenquist residency at North Dakota State University in 2009. Prior to joining Purdue University, she has taught at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Northwestern University and St. Johns University in Minnesota.

 

Monica Trieu

Assistant Professor, Sociology, STON

mtrieu@purdue.edu

Monica Trieu

Monica M. Trieu joins the Departments of Sociology and Asian American Studies as an Assistant Professor after 2 years as a postdoctoral fellow at The Ohio State University. She received her Ph.D. in Sociology, with an emphasis in Asian American Studies, from the University of California, Irvine. Her research focuses on the intersection of race, ethnicity, and immigration. In particular, she studies the manner in which Asian American children of immigrants negotiate their ethnic and racial identities, the contextual factors that impact this negotiation, and the influence this process has on their modes of adaptation. Her current project examines the experiences of 1.5 and second-generation Asian Americans who grew up in the Midwest.

 

Michael Vuolo

Assistant Professor, Sociology, STON

mvuolo@purdue.edu

Michael Vuolo

Mike Vuolo is joining the Department of Sociology at Purdue after earning his PhD in Sociology, MS in Statistics, and MS in Mathematics from the University of Minnesota. His research within crime, law, and deviance examines whether laws can affect individuals' substance use, the effect of low-level criminal offenses on employability, inmate adjustment to prison, and the relationship between music listenership and substance use. He also conducts research within sociology of work and education on the outcomes, such as unemployment, wages, and work quality, of particular pathways through education to careers. His research appears in various academic journals and his dissertation was awarded the University of Minnesota 2010 Best Dissertation Award. More information can be found at his website: www.ics.purdue.edu/~mvuolo.

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