MORE THAN SKIN DEEP: INTRODUCING MEDICAL HUMANITIES AT PURDUE

Symposium

9 a.m.: WELCOME AND OPENING REMARKS
              David A. Reingold, the Justin S. Morrill Dean of Liberal Arts, Purdue University
              Wendy Kline, the Dema G. Seelye Professor in the History of Medicine, Purdue University
9:30 a.m.: PILLS, POWER AND Policy
Dominique Tobbell, associate professor and director of the History of Medicine Program, University of     Minnesota

 Tobell traces the development of the critique of the pharmaceutical industry beginning in the 1950s through the Kefauver hearings and the industry’s political mobilization against that movement. With that, I’ll talk about the industry’s grounds for forging political alliances with the AMA and academic physicians, and its development of public and political affairs program. This pharmaceutical reform movement and specifically the Kefauver hearings mobilized the industry into a political activist one and reoriented its approach to government and politics. These historic alliances and shared interests have continued to shape pharmaceutical politics and indications that things may be changing.

Tobbell is a historian of 20th century health care, biomedical science, and technology with a particular interest in the history of nursing, pharmaceuticals, and health policy.

 

10:30: COSMOPOLITAN CONCEPTIONS IN GLOBAL Dubai: A REPROLEXICON FOR 21ST-CENTURY REPROTRAVEL

Marcia C. Inhorn, the William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Anthropology and Interna tional Affairs, Yale University

Inhorn takes us to Dubai, the Middle East’s only global city and an emerging medical tourism hub. At a medically cosmopolitan clinic called Conceive on the city’s border, infertile couples from five continents and nearly one-third of the world’s nations strive to make a test-tube baby. This paper explores the emergence of Dubai as a global “reprohub” and a site of cultural and medical cosmopolitanism. The movement of infertile “reprotravelers” to cosmopolitan cities like Dubai in the global South is set within a larger conceptual framework, which Inhorn calls a “reprolexicon.”

 

Over the past 30 years, Inhorn has conducted multi-sited research on the social impact of infertility and assisted reproductive technologies in Egypt, Lebanon, the United Arab Emirates, and Arab America. She is the author of five books on the subject, including Cosmopolitan Conceptions: IVF Sojourns in Global Dubai.

11:30 a.m.: SOURCES AT OUR FINGERTIPS: PURDUE’S PSYCHOACTIVE SUBSTANCE RESEARCH COLECTION

Stephanie Schmitz, the France A. Córdova Archivist, Psychoactive Substances Research Collection, Purdue University
David E. Nichols, professor emeritus of pharmacology, Purdue University
Lauren Haslem, graduate student, Department of History, Purdue University

This panel features an important collection at Purdue about psychiatric research that was essentially prohibited for four decades, yet has now made a significant resurgence. The Psychoactive Substances Research Collection began in 2006 as a collective effort between Purdue pharmacology professor David Nichols, the Purdue University Libraries and the Betsy Gordon Foundation. Nichols, who retired from Purdue in 2012, was the Robert C. and Charlotte P. Anderson Distinguished Chair in Pharmacology and a distinguished professor of medicinal chemistry. He has been considered one of the world's top experts on psychedelics, which is one of the reasons he encouraged Purdue Libraries to preserve research from the field of psychoactive drugs.  France A. Cordova archivist Stephanie Schmitz will speak about the acquisition of this collection and its current usage. Professor emeritus Nichols will discuss the paradigm shift in psychiatric treatments that have resulted from these drugs.  Purdue graduate student Lauren Haslem will discuss the groundbreaking research she has conducted in the collection over the past year related to psychiatric treatment in the U.S.

1:30 p.m.: How Neuroscience Bridges the Lines:  An Analysis of Recent Appellate Decisions in Criminal Cases by Race, Gender, and Socio-economic Status
Valerie Hardcastle, professor of philosophy, psychology and  psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience, University of Cincinnati

What is the relationship between the brain disorders and criminal responsibility?  This question goes back to the 1843 acquittal of Daniel M’Naghten for killing someone he believed was the British Prime Minister.  Nearly two centuries later, we are still embroiled in conflicts regarding how and whether brain data should affect our assignment of responsibility and the punishments we mete out.  But, one important difference between then and now is that we can look at actual brain data; we now know much more about how brains underlie thought and behavior.  Brain data have now appeared in enough criminal cases to allow for an empirical analysis of how judges and juries are using this material in their decisions and sentencing recommendations. 

Hardcastle is  the author of five books and over 130 essays. She studies the nature and structure of interdisciplinary theories in the cognitive sciences and has focused primarily on developing a philosophical framework for understanding conscious phenomena responsive to neuroscientific, psychiatric, and psychological data.  

2:30 p.m.: BUILDING BRIDGES WITH MEDICAL HUMANTIES
Listening for Envrionmental Ethics

Jonathan Beever, assistant professor and director, Theoretical and Applied Ethics Certificate Program,  University of Central Florida

How can we reconcile a traditional view of the human being as isolated rational decision-maker with our contemporary rich ecosystemic understanding of an interconnected world? In developing an environmental bioethics, I am interested in the ways that epistemic and ethical concepts shape the ways we understand, value, and interact in and with the world around us.  

Beever is Assistant Professor of Philosophy and faculty with the Texts & Technology Program at The University of Central Florida. He has held postdoctoral positions with Penn State’s Rock Ethics Institute and with Purdue University’s Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering before joining UCF. 

An International Collaboration on the Political, Social, and Cultural History of the Emergence of HIV/AIDS."

William Schneider, professor of history, adjunct profess sor of medical and molecular genetics, IUPUI.

The AIDS epidemic is widely recognized as one of the two biggest medical disasters in the past century, yet research on its origins has been limited in its focus and almost completely lacking in the contributions of historians. Starting from the point of view that the emergence of new viruses is largely the result of what humans do, the historians and anthropologists as well as virologists and an epidemiologist working on this project stress that the AIDS epidemic is man-made.

Schneider, is founding director of the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Program, one of the first undergraduate Medical Humanities majors in this country. Author and editor of six books, his research and teaching interests in the History of science and medicine cover French history and twentieth-century Europe; global health history; eugenics and international humanitarian assistance.

3:30 p.m.: MY SECOND ACT: MAKING MY SURVIVORSHIP COUNT
Tamika Felder, tv producer and cancer advocate

Felder is a 15 year cervical cancer survivor and internationally recognized patient advocate for cervical cancer prevention. She is a Cervivor (cervical cancer survivor + passionate advocate= Cervivor), and founder of Tamika & Friends, Inc., a national non-profit organization dedicated to cervical cancer awareness through a ne work of survivors and their friends. After a diagnosis of advanced cervical cancer in 2001 at the age of 25, Tamika decided to  use he experience and her voice to help educate other women about  ways to prevent cervical cancer. By telling her story, Tamika decided to use her experience and her voice to help educate other women about ways to prevent cervical cancer. By telling her story, Tamika inspired other women to start speaking about HPV and cervical cancer, which led to a network of survivors supporting each other and educating each other. From this network, the project, "Cervivor" was born.

4:30 p.m.: Meet the Speaker Reception

Keynote:  HOW CANCER CROSSED THE COLOR LINE

7:30 p.m. Fowler Hall

Purdue Black Voices of Inspiration

Tamika Felder, tv producer and cancer advocate

Keith Wailoo, the Townsend Martin Professor of History and Public Affairs, Princeton University

 

MORE THAN SKIN DEEP: INTRODUCING MEDICAL HUMANITIES AT PURDUE

November 14, 2016

Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind.
Symposium: 9 a.m.- 5 p.m., Stewart Center, Room 306
Keynote, 7:30 p.m., Fowler Hall
Presented by the new Purdue University Medical Humanities Program and Cancer Culture and Community
Sponsors: College of Liberal Arts, Office of the Provost, Purdue University Center for Cancer Research, Department of English, Purdue Policy Research Institute, Department of History, Purdue Libraries, Office of Public Affairs and the Oncological Sciences Center

Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (765) 494-4600

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