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Courses

FALL 2014 OFFERINGS

REL 20000: Introduction to Study of Religion
CRN: 45031
Professor Ashley Purpura
MWF 4:30-5:20; BRNG 2290
This course offers an introduction to the interdisciplinary, multicultural, and academic study of religion where students are invited to reflect on religion as a cultural phenomenon and to survey the major facets of nine different religious traditions. This course features multiple field trips, expert guest speakers, religiously-themed films and foods, organized debates, and field research opportunities to develop students as informed global citizens who can recognize, respect, and speak with confidence about religion.  All students are welcome!
*Counts towards Area A

REL 20000: Introduction to Study of Religion (LEARNING COMMUNITY)
CRN: 63049
Professor Ashley Purpura
MWF 4:30-5:20; BRNG 2290
This course offers an introduction to the interdisciplinary, multicultural, and academic study of religion where students are invited to reflect on religion as a cultural phenomenon and to survey the major facets of nine different religious traditions. This course features multiple field trips, expert guest speakers, religiously-themed films and foods, organized debates, and field research opportunities to develop students as informed global citizens who can recognize, respect, and speak with confidence about religion.  All students are welcome!
*Counts towards Area A

REL 20100: Interpretation of the New Testament
CRN: 67530
Professor Thomas Ryba
MWF 10:30-11:20; REC 112
This course provides a critical overview of the religious content of the New Testament.  Our working assumption is that theological interpretations of these Scriptures can only be made after they are fully understood within the historical, social, and intellectual contexts from which they emerged.  In our studies, we shall look at how the religious thought of early Christians was influenced by the mythologies, cultures, philosophies and theologies of other Mediterranean peoples in late antiquity. 

REL 23000: Religions of the East
CRN: 41412
Meets w/PHIL 33000-25269
Professor Ashley Purpura
MWF 2:30-3:20; SC 239
This course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of Indian, Southeast Asian, Chinese, and Japanese religious traditions, including: Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism, and Zoroastrianism. The philosophical and religious contexts of each tradition will be considered by examining its history, primary texts, key teachings, rituals, present practice and diverse cultural expressions.
*Counts towards Area A

REL 23100: Religions of the West
CRN: 41413
Meets w/PHIL 33100-25272
Professor Thomas Ryba
MWF 1:30-2:20; WTHR 160
This course offers an interdisciplinary introduction  to the three Abrahamic monotheistic religions of the West: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We will examine the diversity of practices and belief systems within these religions and address debates within and between communities as well as contemporary concerns.  The philosophical and religious contexts of each tradition will be considered by examining its history, primary texts, key teachings, and cultural expressions.
*Counts towards Area A

REL 31700: Ancient Judaism & Early Christianity
CRN: 28173
Professor Stuart Robertson
TTh 3:00-4:15; ME 1012
This course is a study of the emergence of Judaism and the rise of Christianity. This will include examining the effects of Greek culture, evidence of both anti-Semitism and admiration of the Jews, conversion in a setting of religious pluralism, and the development of Jewish and Christian self-definition within this climate.
*Counts towards Area B-Category I

ANTH 37300: Anthropology of Religion
CRN: 67536
Staff
TTh 4:30-5:45; REC 121
Anthropological theories of the origin, development, and functions of religion, ritual, and myth.  Data drawn from western and non-western societies, with special emphasis on the relationship of religion to social structure, cultural patterns, and social change.

ENGL 46200: The Old Testament as Literature
CRN: 57589
Professor Sandor Goodhart
TTh 4:30-5:45; KRAN G009
A study of Hebrew Scripture.  In this course we will read selections from Hebrew Scripture - the Pentateuch (the five Books of Moses), the books of the Prophets, and the Holy Writings - with the goal of understanding these texts within the Rabbinical tradition of Biblical interpretation. All texts will be examined in English and no knowledge of the Hebrew language will be expected.

ENGL 46300: The New Testament as Literature
CRN: 68449
Professor Angelica Duran
MWF 10:30-11:20; HEAV 102
This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the New Testament Bible.  Close readings will be contextualized by the textbook.  Our semester will revolve around understanding the Bible; Special Collections research; and film viewing, all of which will be supplemented by events on campus, the Greater Lafayette area, and maybe even Chicago.   
*Counts towards Area B-1 "Religious Traditions & Diversity"

ENGL 54400: Milton
CRN: 68450
Professor Angelica Duran
MWF 12:30-1:20; HEAV 128
In this class, we will read the works of the epitomal “dead white male author” and explore his global reception worldwide, to see why great authors like Virginia Woolf kept returning to him; the Spanish Inquisition put him on its prohibited lists; and why U.S. founding fathers Thomas Jefferson and John Adams sought guidance and solace from Milton's works as they struggled to define a new nation. Close readings will be supplemented by Special Collections training and a Chicago field trip.

HEBR 12100: Biblical Hebrew I
CRN: 43123
Professor Stuart Robertson
TTh 9:00-10:15; SC G040
The first semester of biblical Hebrew will present the basic elements of the language, including alphabet, vocabulary, and grammar. No previous knowledge of Hebrew required.
*Counts towards Area B-Category I

HEBR 22100: Biblical Hebrew II
CRN: 21285
Staff
TTh 10:30-11:45; REC 117
The third semester of biblical Hebrew focuses on reading and translation of extended passages form the Pentateuch and the use of textual criticism.
*Counts towards Area B-Category I

HIST 31700: History of the Christian Church I
CRN: 66760
Professor Deborah Fleetham
MWF 1:30-2:20; LWSN B155
This course traces the Christian Church's evolution from its foundations to the fourteenth century and will concentrate on five interlocking themes: 1) the Christianization of the Roman Empire and of the Germanic peoples; 2) the hierarchical structure and governance of the Church; 3) the relations between the Church and various monarchies; 4) the rise, triumph, and decline of papal authority; and 5) the principal movements aiming at the reform of the Church.

HIST 39001: Jews in the Modern World
CRN: 66765
Professor Rebekah Klein-Pejsova
MWF 10:30-11:20; UNIV 301
This survey of Jewish history examines Jewish responses to modernity with special attention to the Jewish relationship with the state and with the surrounding non-Jewish society, Jewish cultures, and the diversity of the modern Jewish experience. Special attention will be given to strategies of survival, modernization, and dissent in the Jewish and non-Jewish world using a variety of primary and secondary sources, including memoirs, film and music.

HONR 19900: The Evolution of the Bible & its Revolutionary Effects
CRN: 63066
Professor Stuart Robertson
MWF 1:30-2:20; REC 117
This course is designed for Honors College students. The Bible is the most read book, or maybe the most talked-about book of any that has ever been written.  Many people had a hand in writing it, and far more than that have tried to say what it means.  Its ideas have helped to shape our ideas about not only God, but about business, architecture, ethics, race, the relationship of men and women in society, etc.  Sometimes the Bible is mis-used to form opinions, but even a misuse is a use.  You may not even realize how the Bible has touched your life, even if you think you're not religious.

PHIL 20600: Philosophy of Religion
CRN: 25250
Professor Michael Bergmann
TTh 1:30-2:20 (M 8:30; M 9:30; M 11:30); BRNG 2290
The course encourages critical reflection on traditional and contemporary views about God and other religious ideas. Topics include arguments for God's existence, the problem of evil, understanding the divine attributes, miracles, religious pluralism, and life after death.

PHIL 43100: Contemporary Religious Thought
CRN: 68318
Professor Jacqueline Marina
MWF 1:30-2:20; BRNG 1230
This class will explore 19th, 20th, and 21st century developments in philosophy of religion.  We will be reading a selection of texts from Schleiermacher, Kierkegaard, Tillich and James, as well as analyze some alternative contemporary accounts of the fundamental nature of reality and the goal of human life.

PHIL 50500: Islamic & Jewish Philosophy & the Classical Tradition (& Its Critique by Spinoza)
CRN: 63207
Professor Daniel Frank
TTh 1:30-2:45; BRNG 1248
This course examines medieval and early modern philosophical traditions.  We begin by reading Plato’s Republic, a key foundational text for thinkers working in Arabic-speaking lands.  Our focus will turn to a group of philosophers who lived between the 10th-12th centuries, a high point in medieval Islamic and Jewish philosophy, before Greek philosophy was rediscovered in Christian Europe.  Next, we examine Spinoza’s Tractatus Theologico-Politicus, a ground-breaking, founding document in modern political thought and biblical criticism, but also as a work engaged in the philosophical monotheisms of the medieval past. 

SOC 36700: Religion in America
CRN: 61934
Staff
TTh 10:30-11:45; ARMS B071
Examines the social dimensions of religion in American life; religion in American culture; social profiles of America's religious groups, trends in individual commitment; and religion's impact on American life.
*Counts towards Area C-Category II