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Torsten Reimer

Torsten Reimer


Associate Professor; Director of Graduate Studies; Courtesy Faculty, Department of Psychological Sciences

Ph.D., Free University of Berlin
M.A., Free University of Berlin
B.A., University of Tuebingen


Curriculum Vitae
Office: BRNG 2124
Office Phone: (765) 496-2765
E-mail: treimer@purdue.edu
Web Site: http://web.ics.purdue.edu/~treimer/

Specialization:

Organizational Communication: Consumer Psychology, Decision Making & Teams



Research Statement

Professor Reimer’s research examines decision-making processes in individuals, social groups, and organizations. His research program has the overarching goal to explore how communication principles facilitate decision making by guiding information processing and reducing information overload. Applied topics include the design of persuasive messages and risk communication. Professor Reimer obtained a Ph.D. in Social Psychology from the Free University of Berlin and a Habilitation degree in Cognitive Psychology from the University of Basle in Switzerland. In 2008, he received the Golden Anniversary Monograph Award from the National Communication Association and an Outstanding Reviewer Award from the Organizational Behavior Division of the Academy of Management.

Representative Publications

  • Luan, S., Katsikopoulos, K., & Reimer, T. (2012). When does diversity trump ability (and vice versa) in group decision making? A simulation study. PLoS ONE, 7(2), 1-9, e31043.
  • Blair, J.P., Levine, T.R., Reimer, T., & McCluskey, J.D. (2012). The gap between reality and research: Another look at detecting deception in field settings. Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies and Management, 35, 723-740.
  • Reimer, T., Hertwig, R., & Sipek, S. (2012). Probabilistic persuasion: A Brunswikian theory of argumentation. In R. Hertwig, U. Hoffrage, & the ABC Research Group (Eds.), Simple heuristics in a social world (pp. 33-55). New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Reimer, T., & Hoffrage, U. (2012). Ecological rationality for teams and committees: Heuristics in group decision making. In P. M. Todd, G. Gigerenzer, & the ABC Research Group (Eds.), Ecological rationality: Intelligence in the world (pp. 266-286). New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Reimer, T., Reimer, A., & Hinsz, V. (2010). Naïve groups can solve the hidden-profile problem. Human Communication Research, 36, 443-467. 
  • Reimer, T., Reimer, A., & Czienskowski, U. (2010). Decision-making groups attenuate the discussion bias in favor of shared information: A meta-analysis. Communication Monographs, 77, 122-143.
  • Skubisz, C., Reimer, T., & Hoffrage, U. (2009). Communicating quantitative risk information. In C. Beck (Ed.), Communication Yearbook 33 (pp. 176-211). New York: Routledge.
  • Hertwig, R., Herzog, S., Schooler, L., & Reimer, T. (2008). Fluency heuristic: A model of how the mind exploits a by-product of information retrieval. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 34, 1191-1206.
  • Reimer, T., Kuendig, S., Hoffrage, U., Park, E., & Hinsz, V. (2007). Effects of the information environment on group discussions and decisions in the hidden-profile paradigm. Communication Monographs, 74, 1-28.
  • Reimer, T., & Katsikopoulos, K. (2004). The use of recognition in group decision-making. Cognitive Science, 28 (6), 1009-1029.